Print Page | Close Window

Bread the MaryJane Way

Printed from: MaryJanesFarm Farmgirl Connection
Topic URL: http://www.maryjanesfarm.org/snitz/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=28238
Printed on: Apr 16 2014

Topic:


Topic author: Carol
Subject: Bread the MaryJane Way
Posted on: Jan 07 2009 4:47:54 PM
Message:

In our most recent MaryJanesFarm Feb/March magazine (themed Simply Bee), we tell you how to make no-knead artisan bread the MaryJane way! If you don't have your magazine yet, click here for the article, complete with recipes and things like where to purchase organic flour, etc.

http://www.maryjanesfarm.org/Recipes-Patterns-Instructions/no-knead_bread.asp

Then join in on the discussion below to share your experience and successes!

Replies:


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 07 2009 4:59:47 PM
Message:

MMM! Carol thanks for posting that article online for us! Just reading those recipes makes my mouth water!

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: kristin sherrill
Replied on: Jan 07 2009 5:35:55 PM
Message:

That does look good and pretty easy and not very time consuming.

Have you tried sour dough using fresh ground whole wheat yet? I'd love to know how it turns out. I've tried it and it just doesn't want to rise much. I know sour dough is heavy, but that's very heavy.

I have well water outside, too. I can use that? Or should I get bottled water?

One more question. I've never heard of Simply Bee. Is it a MJF magazine?

Kris

Turn your face to the sun and the shadows fall behind you. Maori proverb


Reply author: lisamarie508
Replied on: Jan 07 2009 6:24:23 PM
Message:

I soooo want to make that caraway-rye bread. mmmmmm There's nothing like a good ham and swiss on rye!

Farmgirl Sister #35

"If you can not do great things, do small things in a great way." Napoleon Hill (1883-1970)

my blog:
http://lisamariesbasketry.blogspot.com/


[size=1]My apron website:
http://lisamariesaprons.bravehost.com [size=1]


Reply author: katie-ell
Replied on: Jan 07 2009 6:56:28 PM
Message:

This looks fantastic! I have saved the no-knead recipe from NY Times but haven't made it yet . . . this may turn out to be my go-to recipe instead. Tomorrow begins Mission: Bread the MaryJane Way!!

www.youaretoocreative.blogspot.com


Reply author: Carol
Replied on: Jan 07 2009 7:09:12 PM
Message:

There's still one last page of instructions coming that we'll get posted tomorrow. Make sure you come back and read the helpful hints it contains before you get started!

"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well-preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, red wine in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and screaming 'WOO HOO, what a ride!'"


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 07 2009 7:30:01 PM
Message:

I think Simply Bee is one of the issue names of MaryJanesFarm magazine. Also- Kristin I think you can use well water but you could try it both ways and see which one does better.

When I had my sour dough, it wasn't heavier than "normal" bread by any means- in fact it was much lighter. I think it all depends on how active you starter is. If it isn't active enough give it a few extra days to let the yeasties beasties multiply more.

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: country roads
Replied on: Jan 07 2009 9:06:17 PM
Message:

I would love to try my hand at sourdough bread. Does it have to be organic flour? or can it just be regular bread flour?

Take care, Melissa.

Farmgirl # 352

~Think happy thoughts~


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 07 2009 9:19:19 PM
Message:

Regular flour has been through more processing than organic flour and has lost a lot of the natural yeast. If you use regular flour the results will not necessarily turn out. Organic flour is best and has much more natural yeast.

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: 5 acre Farmgirl
Replied on: Jan 07 2009 9:52:35 PM
Message:

Hello girls....
I typed in the addy for the bread and it did not work...it is...
www.breadthemaryjaneway.org
Where do I order Organic flour?
After I posted, I clicked on it, and it lead me right to here,,,HA,HA,Ha!!!LOL!!! I am a ?????????

Farmgirl Sister #368

http:/froccsfrillsfurbiloesandmore.blogspot.com
http://thecontentedwoman.blogspot.com


Reply author: country roads
Replied on: Jan 08 2009 09:20:04 AM
Message:

Thanks Alee, I guess I'll have to make trip to Tops. Our only grocery store here doesn't carry anything fancy like that. ;)

Take care, Melissa.

Farmgirl # 352

~Think happy thoughts~


Reply author: janiee
Replied on: Jan 08 2009 10:44:47 AM
Message:

I have a question....I live in Texas and right now the weather is jumping up and down (lows in 30 highs in 60-70)...will that effect my starter? I live in an older house (very drafty) stove is right by north side back door ...so cannot leave it in the kitchen area..maybe a bedroom on the south side of the house might work (away from windows)...??
janiee
farmgirl #390


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 08 2009 11:41:16 AM
Message:

Hi Ladies!

I just read through the excellent article and it really answers a lot of questions! If you read the intro page right above the picture there are some words in green that say "Lets get started" Click there and it opens up the article for you. Once you read through the article, the url www.breadthemaryjaneway.org will lead you back to this topic so that we can continue the discussion!

I hope that clears up some confusion?

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: ThePixiesPlayhouse
Replied on: Jan 08 2009 12:08:51 PM
Message:

I am going to have to try this.....maybe I will start it this weekend.

___________________________________
Farmgirl #428

"It is the mark of an educated man to be able to entertain a thought, without accepting it"
Aristotle


Reply author: KansasConnie
Replied on: Jan 09 2009 08:28:43 AM
Message:

When I rec'd my magazine this week I was so excited! I love sourdough and usually use the type that involves yeast...but this will be so much better!! I can't wait to start the mother! Has anyone started any yet?

Kansas Connie


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 09 2009 10:00:44 AM
Message:

I am waiting to get a mold infestation out of my kitchen before starting mine. My husband was trying to re-invent penicillin while I was away!

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: homemom
Replied on: Jan 09 2009 12:55:43 PM
Message:

I can't wait to try this bread. I love bread!! I picked up a wonderful yesterday at Whole Foods, so yummy with such a nice crust.
I can't wait to get my magazine.
Ruth

Living the farm life in my heart.
http://www.homeschoolblogger.com/Ruth
http://farmgirlinmyheart.blogspot.com/


Reply author: lisamarie508
Replied on: Jan 09 2009 5:12:30 PM
Message:

Finding organic anything is a chore for me since all the stores are an hour away. I'm not even sure if the regular grocery stores in Boise carry King Arthur Organic flours and I don't shop the expensive stores. So, here is a link and I don't think they're prices are bad at all!

Oh, I got my magazine today!

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/list.jsp?select=C79

Farmgirl Sister #35

"If you can not do great things, do small things in a great way." Napoleon Hill (1883-1970)

my blog:
http://lisamariesbasketry.blogspot.com/


[size=1]My apron website:
http://lisamariesaprons.bravehost.com [size=1]


Reply author: QueenofQuiteAlot
Replied on: Jan 09 2009 6:06:12 PM
Message:

Janie, yes weather and temp. changes like that do effect the starter, but keep it in a draft free place and you should do well. Even if it does mess with your starter, it's tough and will bounce back *U*

Dalyn

~Hick Chicks Soap Barn ~
www.hickchickssoapbarn.com


Homespun Raw Goat Milk Soaps 'n More


http://muckbootsnaprons.blogspot.com/
http://proverbs31nubians.blogspot.com/

Muckboots 'N Aprons at Home Chapter
http://yakimafarmgirls.blogspot.com/


Reply author: sweetproserpina
Replied on: Jan 09 2009 6:52:23 PM
Message:

That bread looks so good!

Kind of embarrassing question though- how cold is too cold for the starter? My kitchen gets pretty cold.. all right, my house gets pretty cold (like 40-50F cold) when we don't have the stove going. Will my starter work, or should I just wait til the weather warms up a bit before trying this out?

I seem to remember the goldminers in Alaska keeping their starters alive through the winter, so my wild guess is that it should be alright but...

"Isn't it splendid to think of all the things there are to find out about? It just makes me feel glad to be alive--it's such an interesting world."
http://quaintandkeepinghouse.blogspot.com New Homekeeping Blog!
http://theprimroseway.blogspot.com/


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 09 2009 7:42:34 PM
Message:

That should be fine Meg- you can always wrap it in a towel for some insulation if you get worried, and just keep an eye on the starter- If it doesn't look like it is quite active enough on the day schedule mentioned in the article, giver her a few more days as the cold will slow growth down a bit. Moving her to a warm environment by the stove during the day will help though. Also if you have the stove banked at night and it doesn't get too hot, perhaps she could over night on the stove to get the residual heat.

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: JenniferJuniper
Replied on: Jan 10 2009 3:39:35 PM
Message:

I will definitely vouch for the necessity for organic flour and purified water....On my first-ever attempt to make startet I used tap water and grocery store-brand flour. It turned black in a week. Lessson learned.
I'm blessed to find King Arthur in all the grocery stores (even in 20-lb bags) - they are a Vermont company so fellow New England farmgirls should be able to find it.

Farmgirl Sister #204


Reply author: ginny
Replied on: Jan 10 2009 4:37:42 PM
Message:

It's Sat., rest day for the starter.
Do I take out 2 cups today, wait until tomorrow, Sun.? When it's been divided, it rests in another container? I've tried to figure this out but I'm not sure.


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 10 2009 7:45:04 PM
Message:

On Saturday morning you are supposed to take out 2 cups and use the two cups for baking that day.

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: therusticcottage
Replied on: Jan 11 2009 1:30:56 PM
Message:

This looks so good! I love to bake bread. I'll have to get organic flour so I can make the starter.



Handmade Soap and More! http://therusticcottage.etsy.com
The Rustic Cottage Blog http://therusticcottage.blogspot.com

PROUD FARMGIRL SISTER #100


Reply author: Buffalomary
Replied on: Jan 11 2009 1:40:58 PM
Message:

I can't tell you how pleased I am to see this article about the sourdough starter! One of my goals has been to make sourdough pancakes and bread like my Grandma (my mom's mom) did. I don't know how many times I have tried to get a starter going but it would usually fail and turn black. I never once thought it might be the flour and water I was using. My grandparents lived in the Ozarks and were very self-sufficient. They grew and grounded their own flour. So it's no wonder she had a very active mother. I can't wait to give it another try! Now-a-days, my other grandma likes to eat sourdough bread so it will be neat to be able to make her some as well.

WooYoo, can't hardly wait to get started!!

Buffalomary
Farmgirl Sister #293

You can take the farmer's daughter off the farm but you can't take the farm out of the farmer's daughter!!

Please visit me at my blog: http://buffalomaryscorner.blogspot.com


Reply author: chessie
Replied on: Jan 11 2009 1:45:18 PM
Message:

It is Sunday and I am making my mother...Any one else following the exact schedule in the article like I am?
So exciting!
While at King Arthur Flour's website today I noticed this item, "Artisan Bread Baking Crock", and want to get some discussion on it, pro & con, in light of the Simply Bee issue. However, I am continuing to search for the cast iron saucepan like MJ's and if you guys find it before me please give a shout out. I will, of course, do the same.
http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/detail.jsp?select=C51&byCategory=C321&id=7686

Lisa - I have been mail order shopping with King Arthur for at least 15 years, maybe even 20, and I love them. Great service, great products, fast order processing and reasonable shipping costs. I hope you enjoy shopping with them as much as I do.

MaryJane - I cannot wait for the "Bread the MaryJane Way" Book! I would preorder it now if I could...hint, hint!
Love to all, Karen

www.edgehillherbfarm.com "where the name is bigger than the farm, but no one seems to mind"
blog http://edgehillherbfarmer.spaces.live.com/default.aspx?wa=wsignin1.0
happy farmgirl #89


Reply author: MaryJane
Replied on: Jan 11 2009 1:50:47 PM
Message:

Here's what it says:

On the 7th day, your mother will be ready. It should have bubbles and smell pleasantly sour--like stout beer. In the morning (Saturday), spoon 2 cups of your mother into a mixing bowl. Then cover your mother (don't add anything to her today--it's her day of rest) but take the 2 cups you took out and turn it into bread using one of my recipes RIGHT THEN AND THERE (SATURDAY), not Sunday. Take a deep breath and put your thinking cap on.

I've asked WILLOWTREECREEK (Juli) to get up to speed on my "bread the MaryJane" way so she can help me answer your questions. (She's darn good in the kitchen and good with instructions.) In the meantime, carefully read what I've written so far. Most of your questions are easily answered in the link that is in the first post on this thread.

Happy Bread Making!


MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 11 2009 3:15:28 PM
Message:

Hey guys! As MaryJane mentioned, working with this bread will be my little project for a while. I'm going to be making the white flour starter as MaryJane recommends in the article. I will also be giving a Whole wheat version a try since some of you seem to be interested in that. I plan to experiment with some different recipes and flavor combinations. If you've got any questions or suggestions send em my way. I'll do it best to answer them and will be working on writing some recipes which i will post from time to time for you to try out. In the meantime, carefully reread the bread article! You will find a lot of your questions are answered right there! Maryjane was very thorough! I think this bread recipe/process can revolutionize our kitchens and the way we cook. I hope to show you how versitile this recipe can be.


Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: chessie
Replied on: Jan 11 2009 5:37:50 PM
Message:



Ok! See! It is Sunday & I have started my sourdough "mother". Of Course, I named her...MARYJANE! Will chronicle this adventure from starter to bread... See you tomorrow.
Love to All, Karen

www.edgehillherbfarm.com "where the name is bigger than the farm, but no one seems to mind"
blog http://edgehillherbfarmer.spaces.live.com/default.aspx?wa=wsignin1.0
happy farmgirl #89


Reply author: Bonne
Replied on: Jan 11 2009 5:44:29 PM
Message:

Karen, I started mine today as well, with the KA flour and bottled water. The thing I'm wondering about is, do you have to use the organic flour in the final bread recipes? Can I just use the KA for the "mother"/starter and still have success using mainstream Gold Medal etc. brands for the balance. I guess I'll find out. ;)

http://bonne1313.blogspot.com/ BLOG


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 11 2009 6:23:17 PM
Message:

I am going to make my starter tomorrow, so I will be a day off from the schedule. I think once I get her going I will be able to adjust so I am on schedule with the article though :D I am really excited! I love this article! I think I will print it out, put it in plastic page protectors and post it on my kitchen wall. That way I will always have it right where I will be using it!

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: chessie
Replied on: Jan 11 2009 7:16:46 PM
Message:

well, i'm sticking with King Arthur Organic since the "Mother" is apparently susceptible to chemicals and additives. I should let the others, Julie especially, answer you -those who have done this before will know best, but, since you asked, it is my understanding that Gold Medal, etc - the "mainstream" flours, are made from wheat(s) that is/are purchased from different sources based on the best price the flour company can get at any given time. Consequently the water content and the protein content of their flours are never the same from batch to batch. This fluctuation affects baking tremendously. They, the mainstreamers, also bleach, bromate, enrich & who knows what else to their final products. King Arthur is first and foremost a professional baker's flour source. It is because KA always tests their flours for water and protein content so that it is consistent and the bakeries who buy their wares can count on their baked goods turning out the same way every day... I think KA even buys wheat differently than the mainstream, meaning not as a commodity, or at auction, but instead pays farmer's to grow the wheat for them...not sure...
Maybe others know more about this and can tell you better than I can why you should stick with organic for sure and King Arthur if you can.
Love to all, Karen

www.edgehillherbfarm.com "where the name is bigger than the farm, but no one seems to mind"
blog http://edgehillherbfarmer.spaces.live.com/default.aspx?wa=wsignin1.0
happy farmgirl #89


Reply author: homergirl1957
Replied on: Jan 11 2009 7:18:42 PM
Message:

ok i am on day 4 of my starter and the mother she a smella quite a funky. sour in a pungent sort of way, not particularly beer like. but it is bubbling already . could someone help me out with the smell. can it go bad?
thanks,
cathy

in the midst of difficulty lies opportunity.-a. einstein


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 11 2009 7:20:27 PM
Message:

Bonne there are great benefits to using organic flour throughout the whole process. First of all you are putting a product in your body that is free of chemicals and GM products. Although the FDA deems GM products safe there is clearly a controversy. This reason is a personal choice but a good one to consider. Secondly, as MaryJane mentions in her article the organic flour appears to rise better thus making the final product a better product. Obviously cost is an issue as well. If you opt for the King Arthur flour there is a higher pricetag than "regular" flour. But if you use theorganic flour throughout you can be certain you will get a quality product in the end. Perhaps if the cost or availability of the KA flour is a concern you could us a less expensive brand of organic flour in the actual loaf making. That being said I think you just need to consider what's best and easiest for you. Making your own bread will be wonderful and fulfilling regardless of what product you use.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: chessie
Replied on: Jan 11 2009 7:34:20 PM
Message:

Great minds Alee, I'm laminating my article and posting it in kitchen too.

www.edgehillherbfarm.com "where the name is bigger than the farm, but no one seems to mind"
blog http://edgehillherbfarmer.spaces.live.com/default.aspx?wa=wsignin1.0
happy farmgirl #89


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 11 2009 7:45:11 PM
Message:

Cathy you started will smell very sour. Kinda vinegary or alcohol like. As long as it doesn't smell bad like a nasty gym sock or old chicken it should be fine. Here are a few things to check though: make sure you are using a ceramic (or glass in a pinch) bowl and a wooden spoon. Metal is BAD! Don't let it near your starter! Be sure you are measuring correctly. You started can start to sour too much if it is not fed enough. Check the temperature of your kitchen. The ideal temperature for your started is between 65 and 75 degrees. A little colder is fine but you want to avoid going much warmer. Do not set your starter to close to the stove or oven where temperatures can rise to over 100 when it's in use. Also be sure you are using Purified water. Bottled water is not necessarily purified so make sure it says so.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 11 2009 8:58:35 PM
Message:

My previous starter didn't smell beery either, but more tangy/sour. I learned to love that smell because I knew the mother was doing great! I like to feed mine a lot, because I don't like the super sour sourdough though my husband likes it ultra sour. So if I was making super sour dough I would separate my starter and in my mind starve it a bit for a few days until making Doug's bread. That really upped the sourness.

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: homergirl1957
Replied on: Jan 11 2009 9:26:38 PM
Message:

thanks julie,
it does smell more like vinegar than beer. i feel better now and it is active thats for sure. can't wait to bake the bread and continue to use it. thanks again.
cathy

in the midst of difficulty lies opportunity.-a. einstein


Reply author: chessie
Replied on: Jan 12 2009 07:55:25 AM
Message:

Day 2 of Farmgirl #89's "bread the MaryJane Way".
I put my bowl by my morning cup o'tea inorder to do as MJ suggests in the article. Tomorrow I'm going to time myself because I swear this only took 30 seconds...

I forsee a problem not covered in the article though! My kittycats are eyeing the bowl & Reminding me of a Tasha Tudor story and picture about her cat...This is from her cookbook, page 25
"I used to set the bread bowl on the woodbox next to the stove, a nice draft-free and snug spot. Then one winter's morning I found Miss Purvis fast asleep in the bowl atop the dough with its dishcloth! Pussy had climbed into the bowl of rising dough, thinking it was a warm bed just for her!"


www.edgehillherbfarm.com "where the name is bigger than the farm, but no one seems to mind"
blog http://edgehillherbfarmer.spaces.live.com/default.aspx?wa=wsignin1.0
happy farmgirl #89


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 12 2009 08:22:29 AM
Message:

HAHAH! That sounds like something my cat would do! I have never caught him on the kitchen counter and would probably kill him if I did! Hopefully when you get to the plate on top stage you wont have to worry!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: Bonne
Replied on: Jan 12 2009 09:31:24 AM
Message:

Alee, you say your "previous starter"? Was that made a different way or were you given some?
I've a neighbor that has some starter she calls, "Hannah" and I've been wondering if I should
ask her more about it's origins. I'd just dismissed it when she had mentioned it in the past, but now
that I want to do this........

http://bonne1313.blogspot.com/ BLOG


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 12 2009 10:47:15 AM
Message:

Bonne - starters can easily be shared with friends. On our starter - Saturday is a great day to share if you can't bake that day. remove the two cups and pass it to a firend with the instructions on what to add daily.

There are several different started recipes out there. You will want to check with your friend to see what her's requires. I have seem some that ask you to mix in different amounts of flour and water and I think the "Amish Friendship Bread" uses milk!

Getting a starter from a friend is a great way to get one that has a well developed flavor.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 12 2009 12:00:38 PM
Message:

I was given some dehydrated starter from our very own Farmgirl Ronna. It was very robust and healthy until we moved and I think several factors got to it- different water that wasn't purified, a house that had a mold problem and it got a bit neglected during the move as we ran into housing problems.

Darn! I forgot to pick up some organic flour when I was out and about. Guess I will get some later this afternoon!

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: ennoid
Replied on: Jan 13 2009 07:58:46 AM
Message:

Well, I started my mother today (Tuesday) before I left the house for work. During my drive, I realized I'm now going to have to get up extra early on Monday morning to bake my bread. Yikes! I was too impatient to wait until this Sunday to start. Is it ok to wait until the evenings to bake or are mornings better?

Also, for any Florida farmgirls, I found the King Arthur Organic All-Purpose White (unbleached) flour at Publix in the regular baking aisle (not in the Greenwise Organic section). Unforunately, only the small two pound bags were available, but they were only $2.xx each.


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 13 2009 08:24:41 AM
Message:

Dionne - It will probably depend on your recipe and how long your dough will need to rise after you add the additional ingredients to the mother. If it has a 6 hour rise you probably don't want to stay up that late!

Read in the article what MaryJane says about baking 2 days. If you want to adjust it for a Saturday bake - follow the method for a two day bake (adding extra flour and water) remove 2 cups of mother on both Monday and Saturday. Make sure to still include the day of rest. You could always pass the extra starter on to a friend!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: ennoid
Replied on: Jan 13 2009 08:38:13 AM
Message:

Oh good, then that works out perfectly. I forgot about allowing time for the dough to rise. Thanks! Can you tell I'm not much of a baker?


Reply author: janiee
Replied on: Jan 13 2009 12:26:49 PM
Message:

Oh! I am sooooo ready to see the new mag but it has not reached Waco yet! i even left early today for lunch to go to a bookstore (to purchase even though I subscribe) and they had not received it yet....:( must be patient! (not good at that) :)
janiee
farmgirl #390


Reply author: gramax18
Replied on: Jan 13 2009 9:35:11 PM
Message:

I have a question for MaryJane. Is there a reason that there is no oil or butter in your bread? I have been baking bread for over 50 years and I can't remember ever coming across a recipe that has no fat.
I started my Mother on Saturday and it looks good so far.
Thanks for the good work.
Elinor


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 14 2009 07:08:54 AM
Message:

Elinor - I don't know the answer to this question. I will pass it along to MaryJane and maybe she can add some light. I did a quick online search and actually find quite a few recipes with no oil or butter. I have yet to find a explination as to why! I'll keep working to see what I can find!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: chessie
Replied on: Jan 14 2009 08:34:17 AM
Message:

Elinor, here's what i was told regarding fat vs no-fat in conventional yeast bread baking...gotta be the same for sourdough...
Fat, such as butter or oil, enriches a breads flavor and keeps it tender and moist. Butter especially adds flavor. Olive oil produces a softer crust than butter and peanut oil keeps bread fresh longer. Looking forward to to what MaryJane has to say about this very interesting question.

www.edgehillherbfarm.com "where the name is bigger than the farm, but no one seems to mind"
blog http://edgehillherbfarmer.spaces.live.com/default.aspx?wa=wsignin1.0
happy farmgirl #89


Reply author: Carol
Replied on: Jan 14 2009 12:14:25 PM
Message:

Hi girls.
Remember, you're making sourdough bread here, and sourdough breads and French-type breads are traditionally simple and have no added oils.
Happy baking!
Carol


"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well-preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, red wine in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and screaming 'WOO HOO, what a ride!'"


Reply author: ennoid
Replied on: Jan 14 2009 1:03:04 PM
Message:

I think the added broiler pan of water on the bottom rack of the oven is supposed to help keep the bread moist while it's baking.

I'm excited to find out next week. My mother will be ready then.


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 14 2009 1:55:57 PM
Message:

Thanks Carol.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: LindaEllen
Replied on: Jan 14 2009 3:15:43 PM
Message:

Oh if the talk of the town isn't Artisan Bread. I just finished reading Mary Janes way of making bread, and it looks wonderful, and easy to. I got the last copy off the stand in our closest town, wow that was close. I looked all over the city yesterday for a copy.

I have seen others way of making artisan bread and did a couple of loafs, yum good . But MJ's recipe making "mother" is the way to go. The simple ingredience is just unbelievable to making this very good for you type of bread.

I got a picture over on my blog on the Artisan bread I made and it was good, but I can't wait to try this even better Mary Janes way.

Its very cold here in MO, got my hot cocoa and more good reads from Mary Janes Farm Magazine, I'm good for the night : ).

Linda
Farmgirl Sister #343

Locust Trail Homestead
http://www.homesteadblogger.com/walkabout/


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 14 2009 4:59:05 PM
Message:

Hey Linda! Glad to hear your going to give this a go! I am your neighbor to the South and it looks like you are sending that arctic air my way! BRRRRR! Our highs for tomorrow and friday are only supposed to be in the upper teens and lower 20's! Hot cocoa sounds perfect!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: K-Falls Farmgirl
Replied on: Jan 14 2009 6:43:21 PM
Message:

I started mine today. Can't wait to get to the Eat part! I am using well water so I hope it works. Anyone else not using purified water from a bottle?

http://www.k-fallsfarmgirl.blogspot.com/
Come visit the barn at http://barndoorcreations.blogspot.com/
Cheryl
Farmgirl #309
"If you don't like something, change it. If you can't change it, change your attitude." Maya Angelou


Reply author: Laura Marie
Replied on: Jan 14 2009 6:45:03 PM
Message:

Alright ladies...I think I figured out the answer to my question but I do want to ask this and hopefully I figured it out right....
In the article after starting the mother it says "Cover with wet dishtowel" then it says to see page 68, I didn't see anything on page 68 about covering it with a wet towel, but on 69 it says, "For the first week of her life, she needs to be covered with a thin, dry cotton dishtowel...but after that, you'll want to wet your towel with purified water..." So I'm thinking after the further explaination of why you use a wet dishtowel, that I do what it says on page 69, dry towel for 1st week then wet towel. Am I correct? I'm new at this bread thing. I bake and cook but have never done the bread thing!
Thanks MJ!

Laura Marie #369
www.lauramariedesign.com

"It's not the size of the farm but the size of your heart!"


Reply author: MaryJane
Replied on: Jan 14 2009 7:04:31 PM
Message:

Your summary is correct Laura. On page 67 it should have said DRY dishtowel. That must have confused you. However, some of the women have already said their mother dried out too much that first week. Someone then mentioned putting plastic over it. If your home air is too dry, PLEASE DO try the wet towel/plate method on page 69. (I was trying to cross-reference them but didn't pull it off completely.) I just don't think plastic is the way to go on this. I always keep a dry towel over my mother the first week it's incubating. I've noticed that if there's a thin crust on it in the morning, I can just stir it in and it disappears without leaving lumps. (I think the healthy, good bugs get busy on those lumps during the day. Remember, it's a whole ecosystem in there!)

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~


Reply author: K-Falls Farmgirl
Replied on: Jan 14 2009 7:25:22 PM
Message:

Thank you for clarifying that MaryJane.. I am wet toweling it...

http://www.k-fallsfarmgirl.blogspot.com/
Come visit the barn at http://barndoorcreations.blogspot.com/
Cheryl
Farmgirl #309
"If you don't like something, change it. If you can't change it, change your attitude." Maya Angelou


Reply author: Laura Marie
Replied on: Jan 14 2009 7:39:25 PM
Message:

Thanks for the information Mary Jane. I will keep a close eye on my mother and go from there. I will see how it goes!

Laura Marie #369
www.lauramariedesign.com

"It's not the size of the farm but the size of your heart!"


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 14 2009 7:52:10 PM
Message:

Hi ladies!

It has been my experience that the oil free breads work great! They end up having a richer wheatier taste. Just like with beef- a little salt can bring out the flavor and sauces (in this case oils) can change the taste. It's all part of the wonderful experience of baking (and eating!) bread.

I think a lot of farmhouse and artisan breads were originally made without the oils because, if you think back- oils were hard to come by. Butter was a commodity, and vegetable oils (depending on your region) were scarcer still.

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: Ronna
Replied on: Jan 14 2009 8:20:21 PM
Message:

True sourdough has no sugar, oil/fat or yeast. I made my starter and did not use any of these. Yes, it took longer to get going, but after all these years it's still strong and healthy. Bread made without commercial yeast takes longer to rise. I've used it in so many different recipes, with and without yeast.
Since I'm still waiting for my issue of MJF magazine, I can't comment on Mary Jane's recipe and probably wouldn't anyway. I prefer to not step on anyone's toes, most especially the Queen Bee's.


Reply author: MaryJane
Replied on: Jan 15 2009 07:23:01 AM
Message:

Hi Ronna,
Go to the link in the first post on this thread. It's all right there!


MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~


Reply author: KansasConnie
Replied on: Jan 15 2009 07:44:03 AM
Message:

I'm also using well water. My mother is only a couple days old, but she's already bubbly and "alive" looking! Ohhh...I can't wait until baking day!!! Cheryl--How is your mother looking/doing?

Kansas Connie


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 15 2009 08:16:45 AM
Message:

Here is the link for MaryJanes recipes again:
http://www.maryjanesfarm.org/Recipes-Patterns-Instructions/no-knead_bread.asp

Some of you have been voiceing questions or concerns over using well water. MaryJane suggests either well water or purified water for the mother. The point is to avoid chlorine and other chemicals from the water being a part of the mother. If you have unchlorinated well water you should not have any issues with your starters.

A few things of interest:

Here is a link to an NPR article about the History of Sourdough
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=6061648

Here is a link to a chart that discusses the different names used for sourdough starters
http://www.kingarthurflour.com/professional/preferments.pdf


Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: MaryJane
Replied on: Jan 15 2009 08:27:15 AM
Message:

With regards to well water, it might work--you won't know unless you try! I happen to have a distiller here at the farm so I use it for my sourdough. I'll try my well water next and let you know how it turns out. I do know that chlorinated water won't work. It seems like most people have some kind of water filter in their homes and should consider that kind of water PURIFIED. I haven't tried the cheaper versions like Britta.

Also, I wanted to point out that in the early part of the century and well into the 40s in some cases, commercial bakeries were still making true sourdough bread. Sourdough isn't just for home use. Isolated quick yeast is a "recent" development, relatively speaking.

French Meadow Bakery in MN makes and sells true sourdough. (There are others across the US and of course true sourdough artisan breads are still common in Europe.) French Meadow has a restaurant in the Minneapolis airport that makes the best organic sandwiches on earth--using true sourdough. If you travel and can pick that airport for a brief layover, give yourself an extra hour to dine there. They also serve breakfast. Prosserfarmgirl, Katy, Rebekka Mae and I ate there on our way to the Iowa quilt shoe. YUM!


MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~


Reply author: dkelewae
Replied on: Jan 15 2009 09:09:59 AM
Message:

Okay, I'm a breadmaking neophyte but was wondering if there were recipes for non sourdough artisan bread? Hubby won't touch sourdough bread.

Diana
Farmgirl Sister #272
St. Peters MO
Country Girl trapped in the city!

http://farmgirldreams.blogspot.com/


Reply author: country roads
Replied on: Jan 15 2009 09:17:36 AM
Message:

If well water is ok, then spring water should be fine too right? Our water comes straight from a spring up on the hill. I will be starting my mother this weekend...wish me luck!

Take care, Melissa.

Farmgirl # 352

~Think happy thoughts~


Reply author: MaryJane
Replied on: Jan 15 2009 09:18:47 AM
Message:

I don't have any, Diana. I've been sour jane since day 1. I'm sure if you googled "artisan bread" you'd find something. You should at least try my method and see if it wins over your husband. Wouldn't that make a great testimonial!

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~


Reply author: dkelewae
Replied on: Jan 15 2009 09:46:48 AM
Message:

I'll give it a try and report back on if my hubby is won over :) I just checked and one of our local grocery stores carries the King Arthur flour...yippee!

Diana
Farmgirl Sister #272
St. Peters MO
Country Girl trapped in the city!

http://farmgirldreams.blogspot.com/


Reply author: Amie C.
Replied on: Jan 15 2009 11:55:52 AM
Message:

I just found this thread, and ironically enough, I started a sourdough starter according to a different program a few days ago (a group I volunteer for is going to do a Klondike cooking demonstration as part of the "Big Read" program - The Call of the Wild is the selected book).

So I think I'll start a second sourdough "mother" following Mary Jane's instructions and see how they differ from each other. My current one is just commercial flour, tap water, and dry active yeast! I wish I'd seen this thread first...oh well.

I have a question about the cast iron saucepan...would a dutch oven work as well? I just got one for Christmas and I'd love to try it out.


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 15 2009 12:10:46 PM
Message:

Amie- The Dutch oven should work great- especially if it is a true dutch oven and not a teflon look-a-like. I wouldn't suggest using Teflon because of the chemicals that Teflon has in it.

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: Amie C.
Replied on: Jan 15 2009 12:26:07 PM
Message:

It's made by Lodge, and from what I read on the box it certainly sounds like it's real cast iron. Glad to hear it will work!


Reply author: Bonne
Replied on: Jan 15 2009 5:22:38 PM
Message:

Amie, I've got a 2 qt. "Texsport" cast iron dutch oven that I'm going to
bake my bread in. I got it at a local sporting goods store; fairly inexpensive too!
Many cast iron pieces come pre-seasoned these days, but I still put them through the seasoning
process to get rid of any residual smell. I'm also going to pick up some parchment paper, as MJ advised,
as I've only used it for cooking a couple times. Good luck baking this weekend everyone! ;)



http://bonne1313.blogspot.com/ BLOG


Reply author: chessie
Replied on: Jan 15 2009 6:55:27 PM
Message:

Bonne, That is what I want. Can you tell me the name of the sporting goods store you found this? I went to Sports Authority today with no luck... also went to my local antique stores with a large selection of cast iron items but nothing but small fry pans.
Thanks!!!!
Karen

www.edgehillherbfarm.com "where the name is bigger than the farm, but no one seems to mind"
blog http://edgehillherbfarmer.spaces.live.com/default.aspx?wa=wsignin1.0
happy farmgirl #89


Reply author: Bonne
Replied on: Jan 15 2009 8:13:17 PM
Message:

Sportsman's Warehouse. http://www.sportsmanswarehouse.com/store_locator.cfm
I've seen cast iron in some Walmarts that have a decent sporting-goods/camping section too.

http://bonne1313.blogspot.com/ BLOG


Reply author: Ronna
Replied on: Jan 15 2009 8:15:28 PM
Message:

I've bought at least a dozen dutch ovens over the years in thrift shops. All seasoned and ready to use, love it. They're always on eBay, though sometimes fairly pricey. I won't buy the ones from china or taiwan, just my feelings on not knowing the source of the raw materials. Many are happy with Lodge brand, I stick with the old Griswold or Wagner. I know there's a Rubbermaid tote full of cast iron in the garage and more at storage. Plus those in the cupboard and oven that I use all the time. When I can't lift my cast iron, I'll have to stop cooking.
With MaryJane's permission, I could post some tips and suggestions I've learned over my 50+ years of baking bread, specifically sourdough.


Reply author: chessie
Replied on: Jan 15 2009 8:57:51 PM
Message:

I Thank you Bonne! & Will check them out next.
Ronna, I know what you mean, I, too, have every size under the sun of Cast iron skillets, muffin and corn stick pans, plus a 5 qt and a 7 qt dutch ovens all gathered over the years from flea mrkts, thrift stores and antiques dealers. The seasoning on the used ones is priceless. But along the way I have not seen lidded saucepans like MaryJane uses. I think my cureent dutche ovens are too big and so I am going to see if I can find a 2 quart

www.edgehillherbfarm.com "where the name is bigger than the farm, but no one seems to mind"
blog http://edgehillherbfarmer.spaces.live.com/default.aspx?wa=wsignin1.0
happy farmgirl #89


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 16 2009 07:44:12 AM
Message:

I have a 2 quart lodge one with a lid but it is wide (about 9 inches) and only about 3 inches tall. I'm gonna give it a try though. I'm hoping its not too short. I think I paid around 40 for it and got it off the Lodge website.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: Evonne
Replied on: Jan 16 2009 11:45:27 AM
Message:

Ok I am new to this forum. Heck,I'm new to ANY forum! But I had to join this bunch of farm girls! I am sooo a farm girl at heart! I live in town,but think like country! Well,anyway, I started my sour dough last sunday, so I get to bake tomorrow! I am so excited. I have an old iron pot just like the one pictured in the magazine! I couldn't believe it! I had forgotten all about it until I was cleaning up around our fireplace,and there sitting back in the corner of the large hearth, behind old coffee pots I collect,sat this little pot! I pulled it out, cleaned it and seasoned it,and it is waiting for my bread!
I do hope the starter is forgiving,'cause I have certainly made mistakes getting it going! (I am bad about not paying close attention to instructions!)I have kept mine covered with a damp cloth and plate since I started it. Didn't notice till today,that I was supposed to start with DRY ,and no plate! Also, I had mine setting on top of my toaster oven,and forgot to move it off one day while I made toast! OOPS! I have now found a new home for it to set! I have continued on as if everything is ok. I hope it is! It looks ok ,I guess and it does smell kinda like vinegar,which someone had mentioned. So I am going to carry on as planned. I will bake tomorrow evening and let you know the results!
Have a good day! Evonne


You can take the girl out of the country,but you can't take the country out of the girl!


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 16 2009 7:34:26 PM
Message:

Hey Evonne! Welcome to the Farm! If your starter is moist and doing well you should be fine! The reason for the moist towel is to help prevent a crust from forming. If you get a thin crust most of the time you can stir it back in and it will be fine. If you haven't had this problem yet and all else looks well I think you are off to a good start! Look forward to seeing more posts from you!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: cinnamongirl
Replied on: Jan 16 2009 8:45:15 PM
Message:

oh here is where the recipe is I haven't got my mag yet cool I will need to pick up flour tomorrow


Reply author: chessie
Replied on: Jan 16 2009 9:21:14 PM
Message:

Well it is Friday night and I am letting my first loaf of MaryJane artisan sourdough bread rise slowly overnight so I can bake it tomorrow morn. You see, it has been really hot here lately, over 80 degrees each day, and tomorrow's forecast is for more of the same heat wave. I want to bake in the morning so I do not contribute excess household heat to the ventilation system tomorrow afternoon. I know from the news that the rest of you are experiencing a cold snap of epic proportions. I'm sorry. At least your bread baking will warm your homes appropriately.
This week I also laminated the recipe pages, including the bit about sourdough from MaryJane's Lifebook, since it is similar yet different, and they now occupy a permanent place with the mother on my counter.
I searched but did not find a smaller cast iron lidded vessel like MaryJane's so I am making a freeform loaf within my cast iron dutch oven. I will continue my search next week...
This has been so fun.
Another goal for next week is to add sprouting to my morning mother routine. Since it only takes me 30 seconds instead of a whole minute, I might as well use the other 30 seconds of free time productively.

... peeking at my bubbling "mother" this week

...i timed it...less than 30 seconds! it is very helpful to have the recipes laminated. easy cleanup.

...here she is, all tucked in for the nightrise in the dutch oven.

See you all tomorrow! Karen

www.edgehillherbfarm.com "where the name is bigger than the farm, but no one seems to mind"
blog http://edgehillherbfarmer.spaces.live.com/default.aspx?wa=wsignin1.0
happy farmgirl #89


Reply author: Bonne
Replied on: Jan 17 2009 06:39:03 AM
Message:

I think mine flopped for whatever reason. It smells sour but I've gotten no bubbling. Think I need a new mother.


http://bonne1313.blogspot.com/ BLOG


Reply author: smoothiejuice
Replied on: Jan 17 2009 07:58:30 AM
Message:

oh bonne, try again!

#56
http://hectichousehold.blogspot.com/


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 17 2009 10:36:44 AM
Message:

Bonne - check your starter about 10 minutes or so after you first add your flour and water. It will be the bubbliest at this time and will calm down a bit as the day goes on.

What type/brand of flour are you using? Did you use purified water?

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: Suzan
Replied on: Jan 17 2009 11:09:46 AM
Message:

O Where O Where is the organic flour??? I should have ordered it the beginning of the week when I thought of it instead of thinking I could surely find it in one of the stores around here! Off to Wegman's to check there...

For those of you looking for cast iron, if you have a Cabelas store around you they have them also. NOt sure about Gander Mtn or Bass Pro...


Reply author: Bonne
Replied on: Jan 17 2009 1:11:22 PM
Message:

I used King Arthur's organic flour and bottled purified water. Jessica said my house is too clean~lol I think she meant to be funny, but I have one of those Ecoquest air purifiers that sanitizes the air, so that may be true!

http://bonne1313.blogspot.com/ BLOG


Reply author: Evonne
Replied on: Jan 17 2009 4:42:15 PM
Message:

Ok, My dough has been rising all day. Well I use that term loosely,as it hasn't really seemed to have risen much at all! All other bread I have ever baked has risen alot before baking. Is this different? It is 7:30 now and I am going to go ahead with baking and see what happens.
I was so excited! I hope I get pleasantly surprised with what comes out of my oven! If not, I will start a new mother and see if that helps.
One thing, my cast iron pot is old and seems to be very well seasoned,even after I cleaned it good. I did re-season it after I cleaned it.But.... I did not grease it before I put my dough in it? Could that be my problem? It felt really slick and nice, so I didn't think I needed to grease it.
Thanks one and all,
Evonne

You can take the girl out of the country,but you can't take the country out of the girl!


Reply author: K-Falls Farmgirl
Replied on: Jan 17 2009 5:16:26 PM
Message:

Hello Evonne, Welcome from Oregon. So nice of you to join us. I will look forward to getting to know you as you post more. Everyone here is especially nice. I started my "Mother"on Wednesday,Can't wait to bake it.

http://www.k-fallsfarmgirl.blogspot.com/
Come visit the barn at http://barndoorcreations.blogspot.com/
Cheryl
Farmgirl #309
"If you don't like something, change it. If you can't change it, change your attitude." Maya Angelou


Reply author: Evonne
Replied on: Jan 17 2009 6:25:22 PM
Message:

Thanks for the welcome! Well,my bread was a BAD flop this time. It did not rise, it is cemented to the pan, so I guess that really was part of the problem. I don't know whether to start with a new mother,given the mishaps I spoke of in an earlier post,or just try again and try to correct all my mistakes,including generously greasing the pot or using the parchment paper.
Anyway,although I am disappointed I don't have fresh hot bread to eat,I am not about to give up! So,the story continues !
And I hope everyone else has delicious bread to eat!
Evonne

You can take the girl out of the country,but you can't take the country out of the girl!


Reply author: LindaStimson
Replied on: Jan 17 2009 6:42:12 PM
Message:

Hi Everybody,

Just signed up so this is my first post. I have been reading about the problems and I have had the same problems! No rise. I was so disappointed. So I will start again tomorrow. Was it the flour: Organic Gold Medal? Or the wet towel verses the dry towel? I used a wet one. I got bubbles at first then only a few. Then none.

I really like the idea of doing things the old fashioned way. How did they make bread before you could buy yeast? I had no idea. I have researched it some on the web. I got a wood stove this year. First time in my life I have had a real fire. I have cooked several meals on it and found I had to slow down to wait for the heat. Not a knob to turn! So when we build the house I want a wood burning stove. I will have to have an electric one as well though. Sometimes here on the coast in Oregon we get high temperatures. This week we had 70 degrees! Needless to say we did not light the fire! Was that why I go no "rise"? We were hot during the day and cold at night?

Thank goodness for my Bread Machine. Not perfect but far better than store bread..

I will watch with interest as we get through this together!

First Herwick sheep in America. British sheep raised by a British farm girl!


Reply author: chessie
Replied on: Jan 17 2009 7:24:28 PM
Message:

Well, my loaf was flat but tasty. I guess a freeform loaf in the dutch oven was not a good idea. Next week i will put it in a loaf pan. Undaunted, Karen



www.edgehillherbfarm.com "where the name is bigger than the farm, but no one seems to mind"
blog http://edgehillherbfarmer.spaces.live.com/default.aspx?wa=wsignin1.0
happy farmgirl #89


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 18 2009 06:21:01 AM
Message:

Hey girls when setting your dough to rise you want to maintain an even warm temperature not one that fluctuates.
Linda - ihavent tried the gold medal organic so I am not sure. Some other have expressed that they weren't thrilled with it. I am using king Arthur.
Evonne - I'm glad your not discouraged. I'm not sure what all of your issues were the first time but I'll bet you get it right this time.



Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: Evonne
Replied on: Jan 18 2009 06:36:45 AM
Message:

Thanks for the encouragement. And Linda,sorry yours didn't work either. What is the general opinion here, do we start new mothers or carry on with the old one? As for flour, I used King Arthur unbleached, unbromated,(is that the right word?don't have the bag in front of me),but the bag did not say organic. I used distilled water.
I think I will wait for some opinions before I go on with this little experiment. If I have to have organic,I think my store carries another brand,in a small bag.
But I really want this to work!
Have a good Sunday,
Evonne in TN. where is it ICY!

You can take the girl out of the country,but you can't take the country out of the girl!


Reply author: ennoid
Replied on: Jan 18 2009 09:15:33 AM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by Bonne

I think mine flopped for whatever reason. It smells sour but I've gotten no bubbling. Think I need a new mother.


http://bonne1313.blogspot.com/ BLOG




Mine looks like this in the mornings. It's like the water and flour are separating??? I did use a moist towel the first three days so I think that might be the problem. I can smell it souring though. Tomorrow is my day for baking but I'm not too optimistic.


Reply author: Evonne
Replied on: Jan 18 2009 09:29:08 AM
Message:

I went ahead and started a new mother. I used the same flour,but I used purified water instead of distilled. Also,covered with a dry cloth instead of moist. So the adventure begins.Again.
Evonne

You can take the girl out of the country,but you can't take the country out of the girl!


Reply author: country roads
Replied on: Jan 18 2009 10:13:13 AM
Message:

I started my mother yesterday evening. There were lots of bubbles when I went to bed. I added more today and still the bubbles are looking good. I couldn't find the King Arthur brand in organic, so I bought Gold Medal organic and used our spring water. So far so good! I hope everyone elses turns out delicious, I can't wait til baking day.

Take care, Melissa.

Farmgirl # 352

~Think happy thoughts~


Reply author: LindaStimson
Replied on: Jan 18 2009 10:21:16 AM
Message:

I have been searching around the internet for more information. I have not found what I was looking for. So I just started two more batches here at home. One using wheat and the other using rye. And warm water. I saw a You Tube with a demo for making sour dough starter in a mason jar. I am going to try that later. I saw one reference to using sour dough in other bread recipes, that it has a slight sourdough taste. Melissa, I used that Gold Medal with our spring water and it didn't rise. Was it the flour? Will warm water do the trick? Who knows? I found a lot of references to a book called, "The Bread Makers Apprentice" Anybody read that book? We don't have a book store so I would have to order it. I will keep trying!

First Herwick sheep in America. British sheep raised by a British farm girl!


Reply author: country roads
Replied on: Jan 18 2009 10:49:23 AM
Message:

Linda, I really hope mine rises, if not I guess I could try it with well water from my in-laws. Maybe the big grocery store in town would have a different brand of organic flour. I talked to one of my friends and she says they have a whole section of organic there now. I only go there maybe twice a year, its just too big and too expensive.

Take care, Melissa.

Farmgirl # 352

~Think happy thoughts~


Reply author: Chives
Replied on: Jan 18 2009 11:34:40 AM
Message:

Is it okay to grind my own soft wheat flour to start the mother? Thank you


Reply author: MaryJane
Replied on: Jan 18 2009 11:46:23 AM
Message:

Hi Victoria,
If you mean "soft white wheat" berries, the answer is "no." You will need to grind organic "hard red wheat" berries or "hard white wheat" berries. Soft white wheat is okay for pastries but doesn't have enough gluten to give a good rise to bread. Gluten=protein. When there's an adequate amount of protein available, there's gluten available in due proportion. (This is further complicated by growing conditions but usually you can find out a hard wheat's protein content. 14% is what we used to shoot for when we milled berries for bread bakers.) The flours of hard wheats (11 to 14% protein) develop strong gluten complexes during mixing and are therefore suitable for making bread. Whole soft wheats (9 to 11% protein) yield flours that are used primarily for cakes, cookies, and pastries. Durum wheat is used to produce a relatively coarse flour, semolina, used for manufacture of pasta products. You need to use high protein (high gluten) wheat. Make sense? Here's a little trick Miller Barron taught me when I milled with him. Toss a bunch of raw berries into your mouth and go to work making them into gum. If after a good session, you take it out and you can pull it slightly like gum and it sticks together, you'll have a good loaf of bread.


And just to complicate things for us bread bakers, not all mills bring in high quality berries for grinding. Fudging makes them money, so it's important to get your berries and your flour from reputable companies who CARE that you won't be frustrated when you bake.

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru
~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~


Reply author: Chives
Replied on: Jan 18 2009 12:26:22 PM
Message:

Great advice thank you vicki


Reply author: LynnMarie
Replied on: Jan 18 2009 1:27:23 PM
Message:

Has anyone tried using spelt flour? I can't eat regular flour.

Bringing the Past Back to Life
www.freewebs.com/decampsettlement


"You may never know what results come from your action. But, if you do nothing, there will be no results" -Gandhi


Reply author: carollynn79
Replied on: Jan 18 2009 3:10:31 PM
Message:

this bread sounds good, I will try it especially the rye version.


Carol lovin the country life


Reply author: gramadinah
Replied on: Jan 18 2009 5:26:33 PM
Message:

I started my starter last Wed with store brand flour and bottled water it has bubbles and is smelling like a good sour dough. I went and got organic flour at the Coop and the difference in the bubbles is amazing. It was working ok but the organic unbleached has really given it life. But I don't have 2 cups and some to keep the mother so will keep feeding until I have enough and bake bread later. I have well water and with regular bread it would not rise so I went with the bottled water and have used hot water when I feed the mother. I have a double oven and have put it in the lower one to grow it is warm and no drafts and I hope to see bread soon but I am really looking foward to sourdough pancakes.

Diana

Farmgirl Sister #273


Reply author: wooliespinner
Replied on: Jan 18 2009 5:44:40 PM
Message:

I don't know if it was somewhere in this thread or not but I was wondering where to get the small cast iron dutch oven to bake the bread in, not sure if thats what it is called. I went online and found a few small dutch ovens. Does anyone have the diameter of the one Maryjane uses in her magazine. If I had the dimentions then I would be able to compare and maybe find one. Thanks a bunch.

Linda

Raspberry Run Farm
Nubian Dairy Goats


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 18 2009 6:56:32 PM
Message:

She recommends a 2 quart one I think but in my search I have found the dimensions can vary. Several have suggested sporting goods stores such as Cabelas, gander mtn, Bass Pro etc. You can also order online from Lodge. I haven't been able to find one quite like MaryJane describes. I'm thinking she needs to find a source and start selling them through her website!!!!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: Buffalomary
Replied on: Jan 18 2009 9:39:28 PM
Message:

Well, I made my first loaf yesterday and now I am ready to go skeet shooting! It just didn't raise like it was suppose to. I was concerned because the kitchen got a little cooler than it should have. Even though the temp reached 200 in the middle, it still looks doughy in the middle and the crust is so hard, I could hardly cut it. Oh well, my mother is still bubbling and it will just get better with age. So I'll try again this next Saturday!

As far as locating dutch ovens/cast iron pots, you might also try military surplus stores. That's where I got my two dutch ovens. Another source is Lehmans. They are in Ohio and cater to the Amish and homesteader types and have various types of cast iron. I originally got my set of cast iron pots when my son was 2 weeks old from Fingerhut. That was back in 1983! Other than my stainless steel and granny ware canning pots, I have been using cast iron since then.

Buffalomary
Farmgirl Sister #293

You can take the farmer's daughter off the farm but you can't take the farm out of the farmer's daughter!!

Please visit me at my blog: http://buffalomaryscorner.blogspot.com


Reply author: Ronna
Replied on: Jan 18 2009 11:16:56 PM
Message:

It seems to me that those baking "bricks" are not allowing the dough long enough time to rise before baking. Can't really go by a clock, and the warmth of the place where it's rising will affect it too. Can't be too warm or it will start to bake before it hits the oven. On the other hand, if the spot is too cool, it will take much longer than what the recipe states. It's a whole different scenario from baking with yeast, where it starts to work right away and you know the dough will double in size in an hour and the loaf will double again in a bit less than an hour after shaped. Baking with sourdough is one of the "back to basics" that will become a lost art if generations to come don't keep it going. My own MIL did not care for the taste of sourdough, but knowing I did, told me she realized that's what her mother and grandmother used, keeping the starter at the back of the stove where it was relatively cool and using it to make bread daily. She was born in 1904 in Kansas. Ask questions, keep trying and if you're determined, you'll learn to make and enjoy your bread. Just today I added a half cup of starter to my pizza dough and the flavor it adds to the crust makes a huge difference. There are some great bread baking books (until the possibly upcoming one by MaryJane). Peter Reinhart has written several; I tested recipes for one he did on Pizza and other flatbreads a few years back. His books are very detailed on the what's and why's for those who want lots of info. The old ones, like Sourdough Jack's, are interesting to read along with picking up some good tips. Practice makes perfect to some extent. I've been trying to remember how my first loaf of bread came out and it's been too many years. I baked yeast bread before trying sourdough and probably that helped to have some experience in how it should look.


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 19 2009 06:58:12 AM
Message:

That's great advice, Ronna! I always would bake a cake or something first and let me sour dough rise on the coolest (but also still warm) burner of the oven as it baked the cake. Baking while the sourdough rose also kept my kitchen just a little bit warmer which helped a lot. Another thing you can do is have it rise while the bowl is on a heating pad. But you have to know your heating pad won't go over the 80ish degree range.

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: jpbluesky
Replied on: Jan 19 2009 07:08:30 AM
Message:

I have not read through the all 8 pages of this thread, so perhaps this question has been asked......however, I was reading the magazine last night, and wondered exactly what MJ calls a muffin tin. She advises using one with water in it in the oven as you make your artisan bread. My muffin tin is what I call a cupcake pan.....would you put water in each little place, or is a muffin tin the same as a brownie or sheet cake pan?

Farmgirl Sister # 31

www.blueskyjeannie.blogspot.com

Psalm 51: 10-13


Reply author: Ronna
Replied on: Jan 19 2009 07:53:45 AM
Message:

muffin/cupcake, same thing. It's just less likely to slosh water than from a larger pan. Can also set the pan in the oven and pour water from a pitcher or measuring cup to fill it.


Reply author: MaryJane
Replied on: Jan 19 2009 07:59:28 AM
Message:

JP, Yes, a cupcake pan with all the little places filled with water.

Ronna, I looked up the books you suggested on Amazon. I hadn't heard of Reinhart but his work looks fabulous. I assume his recipes are for kneaded bread. But I would think many of the same principles apply here, so please jump in and give me a hand!!!! I so want to keep everyone encouraged. I've learned that teaching/giving instructions is tricky. If you say too much, you lose people but if you don't say enough, someone will zoom in on that one little thing: cupcake vs. muffin! That's why a forum is so useful.

Once you "get it," it's so darn easy. It takes me more time to brush and floss my teeth than it does to make this bread on a daily basis.


MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~


P.S. My crew was the recipient of my recent sourdough frenzy. I had a huge mother going on the counter and loaves of bread raising everywhere. They ate every last morsel and raved about it. The day we ate Farmhouse White just out of the oven with butter and honey on it, I noticed everyone snuck back down to the bunkhouse kitchen within an hour for seconds. The rye was a huge hit for sandwiches. Carol cooked some of my new organic hamburger one day and we all had rye/hamburger sandwiches topped with a mountain of greens from our year-round greenhouse.

On days when I was in a hurry to bake any of it for photos or because of my schedule, I just set the loaves next to the wood stove on some wooden TV trays and it would rise in say, four hours.

P.P.S. My favorite 2-quart "oven" (actually called a cast iron saucepan) is 4 inches high, 6.5 inches across on the top (inside to inside) and 5 1/4 inches across on the bottom (inside to inside). It's an "American Camper." You can still find them on e-bay. I've had mine so long I probably bought it new while they were still manufacturing them. I found a new 3-quart cast iron saucepan that I bought recently (maybe it was a Lodge) and it works just fine. Think of it as a treasure hunt. I do treasure my cast iron.


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 19 2009 08:24:59 AM
Message:

I'm gonna agree with Ronna on the not allowing your dough to rise enough! I imagine many of us are excited and cant wait to get it in the oven! BUT - if you aren't allowing enough time for the rise than you are missing a crucial step.

Consider too the temperature of the vessel in which you are conducting the rise. If you are setting it into a very cold cast iron pan than the temperature of your dough is going to initially cool just a bit. The natural yeasts are going to be most active in a warm environment.

If you are not currently using a stove you have several options for creating a warm environment.

FIRST - don't add cold water to the mother. Use room temperature water or slightly warm(NOT HOT) water.

Then you can do several things to create a warm environment. If the temperature of your house is around 70 degrees you should be fine unless it is really drafty or fluctuates as the heat kicks on and off.

MICROWAVE - Heat a bowl full of water in the Microwave for around 5 minutes. Immediatly remove and place your dough in the microwave and close. This will create a slightly warm enviromnemt. Avoid opening the door or you will let out the little bit of warmth you created.

SUNNY WINDOW - Set the dough near a warm sunny window. Just be careful it doesn't get too hot that a thick crust starts to form.

Heating Pad - a heating pad left on a low setting works great. Set the bowl on top of the pad.

If in doubt - give the rise more time. The more you work with the starter and the breads you will get an eye for it. Relax a little! Don't be afraid to make mistakes or you will make your self too cautious. Enjoy it!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: dkelewae
Replied on: Jan 19 2009 09:04:15 AM
Message:

Regarding the King Arthur flour...I noticed they have artisan bread flour(it's on backorder online). Would that work better or would there be any difference in using the regular organic flour?

Diana
Farmgirl Sister #272
St. Peters MO
Country Girl trapped in the city!

http://farmgirldreams.blogspot.com/


Reply author: MaryJane
Replied on: Jan 19 2009 09:08:27 AM
Message:

I would stick with the organic but if you do get the artisan, let us know how it turns out.

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~


Reply author: dkelewae
Replied on: Jan 19 2009 09:23:34 AM
Message:

I think I'll try them both for a comparison test. I'll be sure to post the results.

Diana
Farmgirl Sister #272
St. Peters MO
Country Girl trapped in the city!

http://farmgirldreams.blogspot.com/


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 19 2009 10:03:10 AM
Message:

Diana I am doing some comparison testing between the KA All Purpose and Bread flours. I will let you know if I find any considerable difference between them. They just arrived mid week last week so I'm not to the baking stage yet.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: dkelewae
Replied on: Jan 19 2009 10:07:08 AM
Message:

Julie- I haven't even gotten to the store to get the flour yet. I had an emergency appendectomy on Jan 7th and go to the doc today for my post op visit. I'm hoping to get the green light to return to driving,etc. Let me know how your testing turns out!

Diana
Farmgirl Sister #272
St. Peters MO
Country Girl trapped in the city!

http://farmgirldreams.blogspot.com/


Reply author: gramadinah
Replied on: Jan 19 2009 10:26:33 AM
Message:

I just mixed in my salt honey and flour and it is in a warm place and looking ok I have taken pictures will post when it comes out of the oven. I did the parchment on a cookie sheet style with a smooth top.

Diana

Farmgirl Sister #273


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 19 2009 12:55:06 PM
Message:

Just curious to see if any of you have used stoneware baking pans and what your results were.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: Pearlsnjeans
Replied on: Jan 19 2009 2:15:33 PM
Message:

My local grocer had the regular King Arthur organic flour. So I started my "mother" yesterday, and can hardly wait until Saturday to try baking!

Vicki
Farmgirl Sister #120
Today well lived makes every yesterday a memory of happiness and every tomorrow a vision of hope.


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 19 2009 3:23:07 PM
Message:

Great Diana! Can't wait to see the pictures and hear how it turned out.

Vicki- glad you are joining this project! Keep us posted!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: wooliespinner
Replied on: Jan 19 2009 4:43:06 PM
Message:

Well I started the sourdough starter on Sunday with the unbleached white flour. I got a little braisen today and added homeground Montana gold wheat. I looked at the bag and its hard wheat. I did what MaryJane suggested and chewed on some of the berries and after a few minutes a ball formed like chewing gum....too cool.
So I am going to feed it the unbleached and the homeground and see what happens. This evening I looked and it was bubbling but I also noticed a little water seperation in a few places.
I am going to start looking for the little skillet. I think that would help with the shape to have one of those.

Here's to having fun with food........lol.
Linda

Raspberry Run Farm
Nubian Dairy Goats


Reply author: jpbluesky
Replied on: Jan 19 2009 4:49:51 PM
Message:

Love this topic! And who does not love fresh bread? Thanks, MJ for your quick answers to all of our questions.

Farmgirl Sister # 31

www.blueskyjeannie.blogspot.com

Psalm 51: 10-13


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 19 2009 5:13:05 PM
Message:

Linda a small bit of "liquid" on top will be normal after the dough sits for a while. It should stir back in on your next addition of flour and water.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: gramadinah
Replied on: Jan 19 2009 5:15:02 PM
Message:

It is 8 hours later and I am not going to even bake the bread. I thought I had it going good nice bubbles good smell but yet no rise what so ever. So I will keep trying by feeding the starter and see about it next week.

Diana

Farmgirl Sister #273


Reply author: wooliespinner
Replied on: Jan 19 2009 5:30:54 PM
Message:

Thanks Julie,

I wan't sure if this was normal or not. Will keep my fingers crossed until Sunday.

I took bonne's adice and went to http://www.texsport.net/cookware-by-cookware-type-cs-79~75.html#Dutch+Ovens and they have the 2 quart little dutch ovens. This one has legs and comes preseasoned. I would like to have one without the legs but since its the right size it will fit the bill. Its the first one I have seen that was the right size and has some depth to it. The other ones I have seen are to wide and shallow. Super thanks Bonne for your help !!

Sorry to hear that Diana.......maybe if it sets overnight it will still rise.

Linda


Raspberry Run Farm
Nubian Dairy Goats


Reply author: Ronna
Replied on: Jan 19 2009 5:43:55 PM
Message:

Diana, your loaf will not rise much done freeform. Without the confines of some sort of pan, it will spread out more than rise high.
Conflicting opinions on stirring the liquid (hooch) back in or pouring it off. I always stir it in, knowing it will add to the flavor. It will look like dirty dishwater, but that's okay.
I've not seen addressed the small possibility of your starter turning red. Red is bad, means bad bacteria. If this should happen, toss it out, be sure to clean well and sanitize your bowl and start over.
Julie, I've baked bread in stoneware, such as pampered chef and also the clay cookers. Bread will be crisper baked in the pampered chef pans. Trying to remember on those, but do know if you use a clay cooker, you must soak it in water and start your bread in a cold oven. I'll try to find the method for them. Also let it rise in the pan in a sink of warm water...it's interesting, but probably too involved for those just learning to bake bread.
With MaryJane's permission (thank you), I'll try to answer what I can and help those who need a bit of confidence to get it going and be successful.
As with most anything, experience makes it easier and even better.


Reply author: Bonne
Replied on: Jan 19 2009 5:56:02 PM
Message:

((Ronna))

You're welcome Linda~Their dutch ovens are reasonably priced even with the heavy shipping weight, I believe.

http://bonne1313.blogspot.com/ BLOG


Reply author: LindaStimson
Replied on: Jan 19 2009 9:13:55 PM
Message:

I have three bowls of starter going at the moment. I have not figured out how to post pictures. I will try again tomorrow. One is with rye, one with Wheat and the other is the King Arthur flour. I started with warm water perhaps that's the trick? All are bubbling nicely, but it is only day two. Anybody got anything to report?

First Herwick sheep in America. British sheep raised by a British farm girl!


Reply author: country roads
Replied on: Jan 19 2009 9:21:36 PM
Message:

Ronna, thanks for the tidbit about the hooch, I thought something happened to my "mother" while I was at work. I stirred it back in tonight...is that ok? or should I have waited til morning when I added more flour and water? I didn't see any bubbles under the hooch. Also, I have cast iron bread pans will it bake ok in them? I think I read earlier in this topic that it has to bake with a lid on it, would foil on the top of my cast iron bread pan be ok?

Take care, Melissa.

Farmgirl # 352

~Think happy thoughts~


Reply author: ennoid
Replied on: Jan 19 2009 9:25:54 PM
Message:

Well, the bread was a success at my house. My kids all loved it. My husband was a bit skeptical. I think he was afraid of botchalism or something , but he liked it as well.

I've had serious doubts about my mother, but on Monday morning she looked happy and ready to go. I did let her rise for eight hours. However, I probably would have done better by stopping at seven. Her top layer dried out a bit and didn't rise during the baking (my fault for taking the lid off while the oven preheated...Opps!)

I think I'll do without the parchment next week too. It left funny creases on the sides. My pot is seasoned enough that I should be ok without it.



Reply author: country roads
Replied on: Jan 20 2009 02:48:24 AM
Message:

My mother hasn't bubbled since the hooch showed up, is that bad? Is it supposed to bubble for the entire week or how ever long you keep it going?

Take care, Melissa.

Farmgirl # 352

~Think happy thoughts~


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 20 2009 05:47:32 AM
Message:

Melissa it probably isn't going to bubble constantly. It will bubble the most shortly after you add the flour and water and will then calm down as it rests during the day. The amount of bubbles will also be effected by the type of flour you use. I am doing 3 differetn starters right now and they all have different amounts of bubbles.

Dionne - so glad to hear you had sucess!!!!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: wooliespinner
Replied on: Jan 20 2009 06:35:39 AM
Message:

Okay I missed the part about the hooch. What exactly is the hooch?

I fed the mother today and its bubbling. This makes day 3 for me. It kinda smells like funny beer today. So I guess thats a good sign. I am still adding half unbleached flour and half homeground Montana gold wheat. I can't wait until Saturday to bake !!!

Linda

Raspberry Run Farm
Nubian Dairy Goats


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 20 2009 06:44:46 AM
Message:

Remember that sourdough starter is a living organism. It is made of wild yeasts that have been captured from the air. The starter will consume starch in the flour, and it produces alcohol (hooch) at the end of the process. The starter will be like a smooth batter when you feed it. As it digests the new flour you have added it will bubble and froth. When it has "eaten" all the available food it will start to produce hooch, the liquid layer you'll see on the top.
When the hooch builds up, and there's no more bubbling activity, it's time to feed the starter. The Hooch will build up more as the week goes on. when you add your flour and water in the morning you can stir it back in. It is a natural process and will not hurt anything.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: wooliespinner
Replied on: Jan 20 2009 07:03:40 AM
Message:

Thanks so much for the info Julie.
I have been going back through the thread and there's alot to read.....lol. With my slow internet it takes forever for each page to load.
My husband said he has never seen me spend so much time on the computer in a very long time. I usually don't get on very often because its so slow. But the sourdough bread making has really got me excited and I am learning so much. I really looked forward to dialing up today and seeing what everyone was up to with their starter.

Linda

Raspberry Run Farm
Nubian Dairy Goats


Reply author: boonedesigns
Replied on: Jan 20 2009 07:12:55 AM
Message:

I followed the directions for the starter. I admit I did not do them exactly (editors: they are a little hard to follow being that they part is on one page and then some info on another and some in the side column). I think that is why I didn't see that I was NOT suppose to cover the starter with a wet towl and plate the first week. It must have effected my rise. Because I baked the hard dense bricks with an even harder crust.

Now I wonder if I need to start all over or use the current starter and start over only covering it with a dry towel this week. Or dump it and start over. I hate waiting another week to see if I will be baking bricks again or bread.I guess I have decided to start a new starter and continue the old one two and bake 2 recipes next week and see if either works out

I hope to someday have the bread that Jane Raves about. Not today though. Our chickens enjoyed it though so it wasn't a total waste I suppose.


Reply author: Ronna
Replied on: Jan 20 2009 07:30:28 AM
Message:

Once your starter is going, it should bubble within an hour of being fed. As Julie said, when it's digested the new flour, it will "hibernate" until fed again. If it's come to life at the beginning, it will again unless you do something really drastic like expose it to extreme heat. When not being used or fed, I keep mine in the fridge. If you are going to use it often, it will be fine on the counter. Some freeze the excess, I've found it does just fine in the fridge as long as helpful family members don't think it's something gone bad and toss it. Mark your container.
Another thing I'd like to mention for those who continue with the starter is contamination. While sitting on your counter, covered or not, don't use any strong cleaners or such in the vicinity as it will pick up the odors and possibly be contaminated. Just put it in the fridge while you're doing the spring cleaning and take it out later. I'll relate my horror story in another post. Thankfully, a lady in Canada I'd shared with sent me back some of my own starter when I killed it. Now I always keep some dried..which we can discuss later too.


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 20 2009 07:46:08 AM
Message:

Do keep in mind though that the starter will absorb things while in your fridge. If you do not keep a very clean fridge or often have old or moldy food in your fridge you want to clean it well before storing your starter in here. You also want to allow time for the cleaner you used to disapate. The best home for your starter is on the counter.

Sandy the starter is very forgiving and the and covering it with the wet towel and plate probably wasn't as detrimental as you think. If you got bubble and that sour smell you should be fine. I would suggest you contine working with it this week - perhaps leaving off the plate and just using the towel to allow it to breath a little more.

Also when it is rising you do not need a wet towel. You want to cover your baking container with the lid left slightly "ajar" to allow some air circulation. If you do not have a lidded container a leaving it uncovered or using a dry towel will work just fine. Make sure you are allowing enough time for the rise and that there is a consistant warm temperature.

Did you use a thermometer when baking?

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 20 2009 07:55:34 AM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by country roads

My mother hasn't bubbled since the hooch showed up, is that bad? Is it supposed to bubble for the entire week or how ever long you keep it going?

Take care, Melissa.

Farmgirl # 352

~Think happy thoughts~



Thought this might make you all laugh. My husband came in a while ago and this thread above was on the screen. He said "WHAT on earth are you reading about???? He then proceeds to reread it to me REALLY slowly emphasising the words Mother and Hooch. I started laughing SO hard. Out of context it does seem really weird!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: gramadinah
Replied on: Jan 20 2009 08:12:23 AM
Message:

I have feed my starter again and will see what happens the bread was hard hard hard I gave it to the dogs and they have the cleanest teeth in the neighborhood.

I really want to do this Sour dough so I will keep trying.

Diana

Farmgirl Sister #273


Reply author: country roads
Replied on: Jan 20 2009 08:15:33 AM
Message:

GIGGLES! I guess it does sound pretty funny doesn't it? I have good news though, after I fed my mother (hehe) the bubbles came back. Thanks Ronna and Julie for the advice!

I was talking to one of our lab couriers from Buffalo, New York, he is really interested in the whole process of making sourdough bread. He even asked to see the article in the MJ mag.

Take care, Melissa.

Farmgirl # 352

~Think happy thoughts~


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 20 2009 08:21:26 AM
Message:

Pass him the link Melissa and tell him we would love tohave him on our forum!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: Buffalomary
Replied on: Jan 20 2009 08:29:08 AM
Message:

Hey ladies! I decided all is not lost on my first attempt. I bet it would be an almost lethal weapon, at least it would give someone a pretty good sized goose egg if it connects! It's round, so giving it a toss like a frisbee, just might work, huh? Hmmm... 'cuse me, think I'll give it a few practice throws...

Buffalomary
Farmgirl Sister #293

You can take the farmer's daughter off the farm but you can't take the farm out of the farmer's daughter!!

Please visit me at my blog: http://buffalomaryscorner.blogspot.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 20 2009 09:09:20 AM
Message:

Those of you who are getting what you are calling bricks - can you help me with a few things. Tell me what kind (brand) of flour you are using, what type of water, what the average temp of your kitchen is and what type of vessel did you cook your bread in. Also let me know if you used a dry or wet towel to cover your mother. there must be some commonality that is causeing a problem. I feel like it is something simple that we are missing!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: Firemama
Replied on: Jan 20 2009 09:54:53 AM
Message:

I know this is probably a stupid question, but on the days you feed Mother, can we feed her regular white flour or does it need to be the Organic. Or is the Organic just to start her?

Mama to 2
FarmGirl# 20

People can only make you feel inferior with your permission, and you dont have my permission......

Dont let the chain of love end with you.....

http://myfarmdreams.blogspot.com/


Reply author: boonedesigns
Replied on: Jan 20 2009 10:00:29 AM
Message:

I am using the King Arthur Organic Unbleached Four in the blue bag. (i bought it at Krogers) For the first starter I used a bottle of distilled water. For my second starter I am using well water but we have a lot of sulphur in our water so I thought that might hurt it. My average kitchen temp is 68-71 degrees.

I put the rising dough over the mantle and fire place last sunday it was about 71-74 degrees in there. I started out covering it with a damp towel then took it off when the dough seemed to be getting flatter not rising. It sat there doing nothing except spreading slightly for over 10 hours.


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 20 2009 10:11:16 AM
Message:

I would suggest using the organic throughout the entire process.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 20 2009 10:14:02 AM
Message:

Sandy - Don't use a damp towel during the rise. Also if you have a free form loaf you will not get a significant vertical rise. It will mostly spread out.

I am working on three different mothers right now and am noticing significant differences in the three. I will let you know my findings after I bake with them next weekend.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: country roads
Replied on: Jan 20 2009 10:55:39 AM
Message:

Julie, can I bake the dough in my cast iron bread pans? Does it have to be covered when you bake it?

Take care, Melissa.

Farmgirl # 352

~Think happy thoughts~


Reply author: Carrie M
Replied on: Jan 20 2009 11:00:01 AM
Message:

Hi girls-

Just baked my first loaves yesterday and they also turned out hard, but I think I over baked them because my oven temp is off a little and they were still doughy inside when the crust was done. I also let them rise WAY longer than normal because of little rising action. After reading the entire thread here I have these comments:

First of all, the "hooch" can be reduced by adding a little extra flour. Most sourdough "sponge" recipes I have saved over the years call for equal amounts of flour and water. The MJ way uses slightly more water so the "mother" will be more watery. I had this problem in the beginning but added some extra flour and found a happy medium.

I also got bubbles on day 2 and sourdough odor on day 3 so I started using a wet towel at this point since my yeasts had been "caught". The dry towel is to allow more air into the container...once your sourdough action begins you can move to a moist towel.

Using the organic WHITE flour will help reduce the "brick" like consistency of your loaves. Stick with the white flour and keep trying. Add some whole wheat to the actual bread recipe as opposed to adding it to the "mother" if you like a heavier loaf, but even when using yeast I find that whole wheat recipes rise slower.

Kneading your dough before rising will increase the action of the gluten. (Another whole wheat secret!)

When making free-form loaves you will use a lot of extra flour. MJ says this in the recipes! They need to be a firmer dough in order to hold their shape. This will require a little longer rise time!!!! Just be patient and don't expect a lot of rise like with yeast where it doubles in just a couple hours! Using white flour will be more successful, but wheat flour will just require some kneading and nice warm rising.

My cinnamon bread was dense, but OH so good with butter. The farm loaf was more sour than I wished, but I'm going to work with the mother and see if I can mellow her a little with more white flour. I ended up with more whole wheat than I liked because my daughter mixed my flours up not knowing that I was keeping them separate on purpose. This is standard routing for us because white flours work better in most recipes, and wheat flour offers more nutritional value. So...we compromise and mix them up before filling the flour container.

I'll be baking again soon and will share my experience!!

carrie m

www.totallykadeshfarm.blogspot.com

Farmgirl Sisterhood #147

Tis better to weep at joy than to joy at weeping--Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


Reply author: Quintessential Kate
Replied on: Jan 20 2009 12:33:08 PM
Message:

My mother has been "brewing since Saturday......and this morning when I walked into the kitchen I senses an odor that is usually not present. DUH!!!!! Took me a couple of minutes and a little investigating.....even before my first cup of joe to figure out it ma "Ma"...that's what I call her. I am using an organic white flour from my healthfood store...."something, something Mill"....but KA. I am very optimistic the fruits of my labor will be favorable. Since my house stays on the cool side, I might give it a couple of more days past the seven before I attempt a loaf of bread. I'm using water purified by R/O....
I'm loving this thread....and learning a lot.
Ciao, Kate

Heart of Texas
Chapter
AKA: Hot Farmgirl #234
http://quintessentialkate.blogspot.com

Today is my best day!


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 20 2009 12:33:44 PM
Message:

Melissa - yes you can use the bread pan and no it doesn't have to be covered. Just be sure to watch the temperature.

Carrie - thank you for your responses.

Keep in mind that we are trying to eliminate the kneading process which is the reason for the slightly higher water content of this mother. The higher hydration will keep you from having to knead the final dough as much. That being said - if you like the kneading part (I do) it wont hurt if you want to knead it a little bit!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 20 2009 12:36:56 PM
Message:

Hi Kate! We were typing at the same time! Welcom to the topic! We look forward to your input!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: nampafarmgirl
Replied on: Jan 20 2009 3:28:44 PM
Message:

I just started mine on Sunday. I call her Theresa, for Mother Theresa. My HB wants it to be a manly bread, he wants to call it Angus, for Angus Young in AC/DC. What a dork, naming your bread after a guy????? Anyway, I have been reading the tips, I will let you know how mine turns out in a few days

Kim
Farmgirl Sister # 302


Reply author: Huckelberrywine
Replied on: Jan 20 2009 4:00:50 PM
Message:

ROFL Angus! You need a 'his' and 'hers' sourdough couple. I love the one Ronna gave me...still going fine. I'll have to get them out and get them warmed up again. They've been hybernating in the fridge. Anyone know why the older starters are so hearty and withstand more neglect? Mine must be grandmothers. :)

We make a difference. http://huckleberrywine.blogspot.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 20 2009 4:07:15 PM
Message:

Starters build a relationship with the air surrounding it collecting yeast, bacteria and other microorganisms. The longer it lives in an environment the more harmonious it becomes. That is partially why those of you who had issues with your first loaf may not want to give up on your starters yet.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: K-Falls Farmgirl
Replied on: Jan 20 2009 5:58:35 PM
Message:

Well... I let mine sit in a cast iorn pot average temp in the house 70 degrees today. Put in a bigger pan than I wanted to use. It has flattened since I put it to raise today. It has been 9 hours and I just put it in the oven. I think it looks like somebody else posted as it is flat. I will make another attempt starting tomorrow..I'll give it the taste test tonight.

http://www.k-fallsfarmgirl.blogspot.com/
Come visit the barn at http://barndoorcreations.blogspot.com/
Cheryl
Farmgirl #309
"If you don't like something, change it. If you can't change it, change your attitude." Maya Angelou


Reply author: K-Falls Farmgirl
Replied on: Jan 20 2009 6:18:23 PM
Message:

Okay, Like Chessie *Karen* my bread looked just like hers.. tasted good.. I will not use the cast iron pan I used as it was probably the reason for a flat loaf. I will try it again... I used well water and Bob's Red Mill organic white flour Organically grown Umbromated unbleached white flour.

http://www.k-fallsfarmgirl.blogspot.com/
Come visit the barn at http://barndoorcreations.blogspot.com/
Cheryl
Farmgirl #309
"If you don't like something, change it. If you can't change it, change your attitude." Maya Angelou


Reply author: chessie
Replied on: Jan 20 2009 6:55:11 PM
Message:

Hey Cheryl, Although ours were flat breads, let me tell you, it makes a perfect foccacia bread! Slice it im half. Into two thinner disks and use to make sandwich. delish! Do it quickly as the bread does not keep long when it is this flat. it goes hard quickly...
big yeah - artisan bread baking the MaryJane way!!!

www.edgehillherbfarm.com "where the name is bigger than the farm, but no one seems to mind"
blog http://edgehillherbfarmer.spaces.live.com/default.aspx?wa=wsignin1.0
happy farmgirl #89


Reply author: K-Falls Farmgirl
Replied on: Jan 20 2009 7:30:18 PM
Message:

Yes karen, I know what you mean...We have been cutting off pieces and there is only 1/2 loaf left just warmwith butter..yummmmmy!( there wont be any left over for tomorrow dinner..!)

http://www.k-fallsfarmgirl.blogspot.com/
Come visit the barn at http://barndoorcreations.blogspot.com/
Cheryl
Farmgirl #309
"If you don't like something, change it. If you can't change it, change your attitude." Maya Angelou


Reply author: boonedesigns
Replied on: Jan 21 2009 05:04:33 AM
Message:

Mine was flat and needed a chain saw to cut. I would be fine with a foccacia bread but not a hockey puck. Maybe next week.


Reply author: Quintessential Kate
Replied on: Jan 21 2009 05:39:40 AM
Message:

This thread is fascinating....but getting long....so I might be a bit redundant here, but I'll chance it. Have any of you baked your bread in a Romertopf clay baker? Just seems like the soak of the pot prior to the bake would put the moisture in....and then once the pot had "dried"...you should get a nice brown loaf. I'm intrigued by La Colache....but turned off by the fragile nature of it. But I have a Romertopf and just think it makes sense. Please let me know what you think.

P.S. I looked at my previous post....and was blown away by all my typos. My ring finger on left hand was almost amputated at the first joint about 10 days ago...and this "hunting and pecking" is most frustrating. I can type 50 wpm.....but can only hunt and peck about 15...lol!Besides that...my bandaged finger covers w,e,a,s,d & r. But no problem......cause I can still feed and stir "Ma".
Ciao, Kate


Heart of Texas
Chapter
AKA: Hot Farmgirl #234
http://quintessentialkate.blogspot.com

Today is my best day!


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 21 2009 05:47:28 AM
Message:

Kate I believe Ronna made mention of the clay baker but didn't say weather she had used one or not. I have never tried a clay baker. If you have one and do please let us know how it works.

Girls if you can give me your specifics (type/brand of flour, water used etc) I can try to help you figure out the problems!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: AuntPammy
Replied on: Jan 21 2009 06:07:42 AM
Message:

Has anyone used spring water? I was just wondering if I need to go buy some distilled water. My husband and son want me to get started on this but I have been procrastinating.I think I will start mine this week-end. I tried the bread from Mother Earth last week and was pleasantly surprised how easy it was. This is even easier!!!

"Keep your face to the sunshine and you will never see the shadow." Helen Keller

www.auntpsalmostheaven.blogspot.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 21 2009 06:48:35 AM
Message:

I am using spring water in mine. I couldn't get any distilled water at the store.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: LynnMarie
Replied on: Jan 21 2009 07:27:41 AM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by willowtreecreek

Remember that sourdough starter is a living organism. It is made of wild yeasts that have been captured from the air. The starter will consume starch in the flour, and it produces alcohol (hooch) at the end of the process.




Since the starter has to consume starch from the flour, I guess spelt flour won't work as it is a protein.

If anyone has tried spelt flour, please let me know if any steps need to be changed.


Bringing the Past Back to Life
www.freewebs.com/decampsettlement


"You may never know what results come from your action. But, if you do nothing, there will be no results" -Gandhi


Reply author: Huckelberrywine
Replied on: Jan 21 2009 4:07:45 PM
Message:

I did use spelt flour, but not to feed my mother. I added it during the other steps. It has been so long ago, I think the loaf was heavier/didn't rise as much. If you like pita bread, it ought to be nice for those as the rising doesn't matter so much. Same proceedures, just cook really hot really fast and if it doesn't puff up all at once in the center making a nice pocket like wheat flour will do, just slice a pocket in.

We make a difference. http://huckleberrywine.blogspot.com


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 21 2009 4:10:53 PM
Message:

I made bread today using yeast from the store and it was a total bust as far as flavor goes. Ick. I think I am spoiled on Sour Dough! I can't wait until I can get my starter going!

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: Pearlsnjeans
Replied on: Jan 21 2009 5:34:04 PM
Message:

Today was day 4 for my "mother". It was bubbly and had a slightly good sour smell. I don't have a cast iron pot, so will have to use the cookie sheet with parchment paper method. From all I've read here, my bread may be a bit flat! Bread has been on my mind all day today ! Can I make it to Saturday?!

Vicki
Farmgirl Sister #120
Today well lived makes every yesterday a memory of happiness and every tomorrow a vision of hope.


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 21 2009 5:47:15 PM
Message:

Hey Girls! I have a recipe to share with you. This might be good for those loafs that are a little on the hard side but still tasty! No need to waste all that hard work! I adapted this from a baked french toast recipe my mom and dad use at their Bed & Breakfast. Let me know what you think.

Baked French Toast with Apples and Nuts
3 tablespoons butter
1 sourdough loaf, cut crosswise into 1/2-inch thick slices
6 eggs
1 1/2 cups buttermilk
1 1/2 cups milk
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 teaspoon orange zest
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
3/4 cup nuts (pine nuts, chopped pecans etc.)
2 tart green apples, cored and sliced
2 sweet red apples, cored and sliced
2 tablespoons orange juice
Honey or Real Maple Syrup
Grease a 9- x 13-inch baking dish with 1 tablespoon of the butter. Arrange the bread slices into the dish in a single layer and set aside.

Beat eggs in a large bowl, then whisk in buttermilk, milk, sugar, zest, vanilla and nutmeg. Sprinkle the nuts over bread, then pour egg mixture over the top. Using the back of a large spoon, press the bread slices down firmly to make sure that each is well covered with the egg mixture. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 2 hours, or preferably overnight.

Preheat oven to 350ºF. Meanwhile, remove baking dish from refrigerator and allow contents to come to room temperature. Remove plastic wrap and bake until golden brown and custard is firm, 45 to 55 minutes.

While the French toast is baking quarter, core and thinly slice the apples. Arrange apples in groups onto a parchment paper-lined baking sheet, overlapping them slightly and alternating the colors; set aside. Melt remaining 2 tablespoons butter, then remove from the heat and stir in orange juice; brush apples with butter mixture.

During the last 20 minutes of baking time for the french toast, place the apples in the oven and bake until tender.

To serve, cut french toast into pieces and transfer to plates. Top with apples and drizzle with honey or Real Maple Syrup.



Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: Quintessential Kate
Replied on: Jan 21 2009 7:03:47 PM
Message:

My mother...aka "Ma" is being made with organic unbleached white flour...although not KA, and bottled "spring water".....which says on the bottle it has gone through a reverse osmosis filtration, and it is doing great. Today is day four and it has a slight sour aroma and is bubbling like champ ....especially after I feed her. I have decided to make 2 loaves on my baking day...one will be in my clay Romertoph pot, and the other in my small cast iron dutch oven which belonged to my grandma. My cast iron pot came sans a lid, but I found one on Saturday while my DH and I were out "troving". I hope to be able to take pics of both loaves so you can see the outcome of each. I am really enjoying this subject!! My 86 year old Mama stayed with us for a couple of days this week cause she was feeling a little bad, and I wanted to be able to keep an eye on her. Anyhoo......I gave her my MaryJane magazine to read, pointing out the article on the bread, and when I took her home today we mixed her up a starter. I told her if she would wait I would giver her a start from mine......but she was too excited and wanted to start her own. She named hers "Thelma"....after her mama.
Ciao to all,
Kate

Heart of Texas
Chapter
AKA: Hot Farmgirl #234
http://quintessentialkate.blogspot.com

Today is my best day!


Reply author: TheresaB
Replied on: Jan 21 2009 7:05:16 PM
Message:

My Mother is 4 days old too! Bubbly and a bit sour, so far so good!


Come see the Sisterhood Dolls on my blog!

Theresa in Colorado
Proud Farmgirl Sister #124
www.thegypsysdaughter.etsy.com
www.thegypsysdaughter.blogspot.com

"I see skies of blue, clouds of white, the bright blessed day, the dark sacred night, and I think to myself, "What a Wonderful World!" ~ Louis Armstrong


Reply author: Ronna
Replied on: Jan 21 2009 8:06:35 PM
Message:

Kate, I've not had time to go look through a 2 gal ziploc with sourdough tips and recipes from years past. If you do use the clay pot, be sure to start with a cold oven or it very likely will crack. If you use it for other food, a parchment liner might be good, as it will pick up the flavors from the chicken or whatever you cooked in it previously. A soak in water first is advisable also. To have your dough rise in a clay pot, submerse it in very warm water until risen enough to bake. Tricky if there's anyone in the house who might turn on the faucet and drown your bread dough :)


Reply author: Laura Marie
Replied on: Jan 21 2009 8:29:50 PM
Message:

Ok, so I made my first batch today and well, it's a lovely paper weights...LOL! It didn't really raise like I think it should have and it started to burn but was never done in the center. I think these are the reasons...I used King Arthur bread flour, and spring water...I chanced it when I was at the store because I forgot what flour to get...silly me forgetting the mag at home. So today I wrote down the flour I needed found the correct flour, got purified water and then I bought my first cast iron pan, although its a large dutch oven, 5 qt...I think it might be good to start with! And now after looking at everyones and how bubbly they are I think I might start a new mother...with all the correct items. So here I go...time for a new mother...
Mary Jane really did a good job with this one. It's keeping us all real busy in our kitchen! I love it!
Farm Girl Hugs!

Laura Marie #369
www.lauramariedesign.com

"It's not the size of the farm but the size of your heart!"


Reply author: wooliespinner
Replied on: Jan 22 2009 05:32:33 AM
Message:

I noticed my mother is bubbly the first few hours after being fed. After that the houch develops on the top and I don't see any more bubbling. Is this normal or should I feed the mother twice a day to keep it bubbling ? My mother is 5 days old this morning.
I ordered the 2 quart dutch ovens from Texport that Bonnie told me about....I am so excited....I hope they come Friday so I can use them. They are going to be already seasoned. If not I will have to try the freeform.

Linda



Raspberry Run Farm
Nubian Dairy Goats


Reply author: Amie C.
Replied on: Jan 22 2009 06:23:09 AM
Message:

I've got two different starters going at the same time: the MaryJane "mother", and a different "no commercial yeast" recipe supplied for my Klondike goldrush cooking project. I'm noticing some really interesting differences so far.

My "mother" has lots of bubbles but produces no liquid hooch. The other starter has no bubbles but about an inch of hooch on top every day.

The "mother" smells more like vinegar, the "other" smells a bit like sour milk. The "other" starter was begun with a cup of milk and a cup of flour, and the recipe does not call for feeding it at all. I've been giving it a little bit of flour though; don't want it to get jealous when I feed "mother".

I'm going to bake from both starters on Saturday, and I can't wait to see what happens.


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 22 2009 07:00:09 AM
Message:

Linda there is no need to feed your starter twice a day. If you are getting a LOT of "hooch" you could try adding a tablespoon of extra flour and see if that helps. The mother will go through active and rest periods during the day. This is normal.

Laura I am doing some testing using the KA All Purpose and the KA Bread flour. I'll keep you posted as to the results.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: Huckelberrywine
Replied on: Jan 22 2009 12:13:20 PM
Message:

A bit of encouragement...young starters do/can either be "slow bloomers/ flat results" or hit the ground running. Don't give up, all yeasts act differently and some are more active. If you have a slow bloomer that otherwise smells and looks good, keep using and feeding it...but maybe start with pancakes. Eventually the mother/yeast will mature enough (with use and feedings) to give you the bread you dream of.

We make a difference. http://huckleberrywine.blogspot.com


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 22 2009 1:01:59 PM
Message:

Bought my flour today to start the starter! For economy reason I will use up the bread I have on hand before I switch to all organic when it comes to the baking part. But "Ma" will always be 100% organic!

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 22 2009 1:11:18 PM
Message:

Great advise Michelle! Thanks!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: TheresaB
Replied on: Jan 22 2009 1:29:43 PM
Message:

This may have been asked before (if so, sorry, my bad) but what about baking in an enameled cast iron dutch oven? It's not super high quality and I've never baked in it before, think it would work? I resorted to a glass bowl as I don't seem to own a ceramic one ( I know, what kind of Farmgirl am I?) for my Queen (as in the Queen "Mother") but she seems to be doing well so far.

Long Live the Queen!

Come see the new Sisterhood Dolls on my blog!

Theresa in Colorado
Proud Farmgirl Sister #124
www.thegypsysdaughter.etsy.com
www.thegypsysdaughter.blogspot.com

"I see skies of blue, clouds of white, the bright blessed day, the dark sacred night, and I think to myself, "What a Wonderful World!" ~ Louis Armstrong


Reply author: wooliespinner
Replied on: Jan 22 2009 2:15:52 PM
Message:

The Texport 2 quart dutch ovens came today, yippie !!! They looked alot like the one in the MJF magazine except these don't have a cast iron handle and they have 3 small legs.The dimensions of depth and width are right on the money. It should help with keeping the shape. They are really cute ! I will be able to bake the first batch of bread Saturday.I can't wait until Saturday.......not that I am wishing my life away....lol.

Thanks Julie for the answer. I will try that.
I guess it makes sense that each mother will be different because each is started in a different home with different wild yeast. Its really fasinating when you think about it.

Was there a recipe for making the pancakes on this thread, I don't remember seeing it? Would love to try those also, pancakes sound really good.

If I wanted to start a second mother for someones else using the one I have already going how do you go about doing that ? I have a friend who is interested. I told her she could start her own but she was curious about taking from mine.

Thanks
Linda


Raspberry Run Farm
Nubian Dairy Goats


Reply author: Huckelberrywine
Replied on: Jan 22 2009 4:06:44 PM
Message:

Sourdough pancakes...great way to start the day. Adding sliced bananas to them really compliments the twang of sourdough, and extra vitamins!


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 22 2009 4:29:00 PM
Message:

Pancakes

3 Large eggs
1 cup milk
2 cups starter
1 3/4 cups flour
1 tsp baking soda
2 tsp baking powder
1 1/2 tsp salt
1/4 cup sugar

Sift together dry ingredients and set aside. Beat egg lightly, add milk and starter and whisk. Whisk in dry ingredients.



Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 22 2009 4:32:31 PM
Message:

Theresa I'm gonna try enamled cast iron this weekend. I haver tried it before. I don't think it would be a problem. Anyone else tried it?

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: vicki Cothren
Replied on: Jan 22 2009 4:49:04 PM
Message:

We are trying to make the sourdough starter - all went well - raising, bubbling and thick, until this morning. We now have a few bubbles and very thin watery dough, what now as suggestions are in order. do we start over? This is our first question so hope it was done right - Vicki


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 22 2009 5:22:03 PM
Message:

Keep at it Vicki. Your working with a "living" thing. It will have it's ups and downs.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: K-Falls Farmgirl
Replied on: Jan 22 2009 5:31:37 PM
Message:

I just checked in on my "mother" she is happy.. She is bubbling and looks great. This time around when I add the water I am using warm tap well water..not cold.. So far so good.. I just added to the first "mother" on Wednesday..

http://www.k-fallsfarmgirl.blogspot.com/
Come visit the barn at http://barndoorcreations.blogspot.com/
Cheryl
Farmgirl #309
"If you don't like something, change it. If you can't change it, change your attitude." Maya Angelou


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 22 2009 5:36:58 PM
Message:

Vicki- It sounds to me like your starter ate all her food and produced from "hooch"- both very good things! That means the yeastie beasties as I like to call them are growing and the population is starting to match their food source. If after you feed her, you don't see action again within a day, let us know what it looks like again at that point. She could either have eaten all her food again and in a resting phase or she could have perished. But like Julie said- keep going! Odds are she is thriving and doing great!

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: wooliespinner
Replied on: Jan 22 2009 8:17:51 PM
Message:

Thanks for the recipe Julie, looks like a good one. After I try baking my first bread Saturday. I am going to start adding twice the flour and water so I can do both pancakes and bread.

Nite
Linda

Raspberry Run Farm
Nubian Dairy Goats


Reply author: Ronna
Replied on: Jan 22 2009 9:23:11 PM
Message:

For those who've baked "bricks" and anxious for a loaf to enjoy, try this San Franciso Style French Bread...it does use yeast, but your starter will add to the flavor. Hopefully, those of you new to bread baking,especially with sourdough, will stay on board and keep trying.

San Francisco "style" French Bread
1 pkg or 2 1/4 tsp dry yeast
1 cup warm water
2 tblsp sugar
1 1/2 cups sourdough starter
5 cups flour (approx)
2 tsp salt
Sprinkle yeast over warm water in large bowl. Let soften 5 minutes. Stir in sugar and starter, then gradually add 4 cups flour mixed with salt. Cover with damp towel and let rise in warm place until about doubled in size, approx 1 1/2 hours.
Turn dough onto floured board and work in about 1 cup flour or until dough is no longer sticky. Knead until smooth and satiny, about 5 min. Can use heavy duty mixer with dough hook.
Shape dough into one large round or two oval loaves. Place on baking sheet sprinkled with fine cornmeal or flour so it doesn't stick. Let rise again in warm place until nearly doubled, about 1 1/2 hours. Place shallow pan of water on lower shelf of oven heated to 400 degrees. Using sharp knife or single edge razor blade, make diagonal slashes in the bread. Bake at 400 for 40-50 minutes, until crust is medium dark brown.
Dough is slashed just before baking for a reason. The sudden heat will cause the loaf to 'burst' with a final rise and the slash keeps it looking nice. Strangely shaped loaves if it's not done.
Salt is not added until the yeast has a chance to start working, as it slows the action of the yeast. Sugar boosts the yeast, so it's added at the beginning.
If you can wait for the bread to cool (I know, it's hard when it smells so good), it will slice easier. Sometimes bread that's cut or torn right out of the oven will be gummy.
Enjoy! Ronna


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 22 2009 9:33:13 PM
Message:

My starter is officially started! She is going to live in my office with me where I can keep an eye on her and where she will have a space heater on to keep her warm until spring! I forgot to get purified or distilled water though- so I had some water setting out all day in a jug. I know after 24-48 hours the chlorine leaves water ( you have to dechlorinate your water like this if you have fish) so I am hoping 15 hours out helped enough. I guess a few days will tell!

Oh and until I have my water jug cleaned I am using a mason jar. I might go buy a glass jug or see if Goodwill has any treasures for me tomorrow :D

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: wooliespinner
Replied on: Jan 23 2009 05:07:04 AM
Message:

Quick question......I was reading over the recipes in the MJF mag. and didn't see where the recipe said how many loaves it makes. I know each recipe calls for 2 cups of mother and if you use the little 2 quart dutch ovens does it make 1 or 2 of these little loaves?

Thanks Linda

Raspberry Run Farm
Nubian Dairy Goats


Reply author: Quintessential Kate
Replied on: Jan 23 2009 05:13:39 AM
Message:

Alee,
I was at Big Lots just the other day looking for a lidded jar....actually for my kombucha...but I digress. Anyhoo, I found the neatest jar that is shaped like a barrel, ribs and all, gallon in size, with a large mouth. It actually comes with a little wire and wooden bale that I opted not to use. The best part is that it was only $3........and my bucha is loving it. Everything in my cupboards is in glass jars....so I usually have an abundance of them. I love how they look.....but most importantly, I can open my cupboard and see what I have and what I need. Most of them have come from Goodwill, Salvation Army and Yard/Estate sales. Just one of my small ways to be green. One jar has a fun story....when we were living in Phoenix (well, we actually lived in Tempe) a friend and I were out shopping at yard sales and started following signs in the Camelback Mountain area, and low and behold, Alice Cooper's wife and her friend were having an awesome yardsale. She had the biggest "Ball" jar I had ever seen....and now it's my cookie jar.
Here's to "Mother"....and her loving nectar (hooch)...and the nourishment she provides!
I will bake my first loaf today.
Ciao, Kate

Heart of Texas
Chapter
AKA: Hot Farmgirl #234
http://quintessentialkate.blogspot.com

Today is my best day!


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 23 2009 05:22:06 AM
Message:

Linda it will make one loaf I believe. I do not yet have a 2 qt size so I'm not certain how small it is. If it(the dough) looks too big I suppose you could divide it.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: Amie C.
Replied on: Jan 23 2009 06:23:16 AM
Message:

Kate, that' funny! Somehow the image of Alice Cooper eating a big jar of home-canned something or other makes me really happy.


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 23 2009 07:43:44 AM
Message:

That is an awesome story!

Well "Ma" is looking good today! She is going to hang out in the kitchen while I make cookies and then come back to the office.

Doug is excited about the starter! I told him we need to think of a name so he said he would ponder it! He's going to come up with something weird I know it!

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 23 2009 2:39:02 PM
Message:

Ma was fed this morning and needs a new home already. I bought some great glass containers at goodwill so after they get washed we'll see which one holds more!

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: Huckelberrywine
Replied on: Jan 23 2009 3:12:40 PM
Message:

I baked 2 loaves this morning in cast iron skillets. The smaller one lead to a taller loaf. Shared one with my co-workers. Sharing starter on Monday...wha-ha-ha...recruiting sourdoughphites...sourdoughfiles? What do you call one-who-loves-sourdough?

We make a difference. http://huckleberrywine.blogspot.com


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 23 2009 4:29:58 PM
Message:

That is awesome Michelle!

We have our first bubbles! I am so excited! I know as the yeasts grow and the population becomes more dense we will have more bubbles! I can't wait to see what she looks like tomorrow!

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 23 2009 9:07:11 PM
Message:

Great Michelle! I picked up a 2 quart lodge cast iron Dutch oven today. I got it at bass pro in Branson, MO. It was a little different than then one I saw on the lodge website. I'll be baking on Sunday. Saturday is so unpredictable for us but we are always around on Sundays after church. That is always our day at home.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 23 2009 10:51:35 PM
Message:

Well Ma is certainly happy! Here is a picture of her at only day 2!



Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: Quintessential Kate
Replied on: Jan 24 2009 05:45:28 AM
Message:

She's Beeeee-U-teee-fulllll, Alee!!!
Ciao, Kate

Heart of Texas
Chapter
AKA: Hot Farmgirl #234
http://quintessentialkate.blogspot.com

Today is my best day!


Reply author: Suzan
Replied on: Jan 24 2009 06:18:16 AM
Message:

Ok, so how do you season new cast iron?


Reply author: Quintessential Kate
Replied on: Jan 24 2009 07:20:03 AM
Message:

Here's my first loaf....I did use Ronna's San Francisco Style French Bread recipe because I don't think "Ma" has collected enough yeast. We have an air purification filtration unit on our central heat/air...and I think it may just take a bit more time for "Ma" to collect a sufficient amount. Otherwise she looks great. She has a slight sour aroma, becomes very active when I feed her.....so I know she's healthy.
Anyway.....I actually liked the kneading process in Ronna's recipe. Kinda like therapy....I was able to vent some frustration on that ball of dough. The bread was...and still is...FABULOUS. I ended up mixing up some olive oil, rosemary, some sun dried tomatoes, Parmesan cheese, small pinch of kosher salt....and we dipped bread in that for supper. Of course the first slice.....the crusty end piece was slathered in butter while it was still hot and my hubby and I savored it.
It could be a little more sour for my taste......and I think by next Friday it will be.
Thanks Ronna for the great recipe!





Hope I did this right.
Ciao, Kate

Heart of Texas
Chapter
AKA: Hot Farmgirl #234
http://quintessentialkate.blogspot.com

Today is my best day!


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 24 2009 07:35:51 AM
Message:

One thing to consider for you gals in warmer climates- if you can open a window and put your starter covered only by a very light cheese cloth or tea towel, then your starter can capture some of the natural yeasts and bacteria (that help give sourdough it's taste) that are natural in your area. Some site I have read even suggest wafting air with your hand into the sour dough container and then stirring- then wafting again.

Kate- If Texas is warm enough- perhaps your starter would like some "window" time?

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 24 2009 07:38:11 AM
Message:

How to Season a Cast Iron Pan:

New Pans

1. Heat the oven to 250o - 300o
2. Coat the pan with lard or bacon grease. Don't use a liquid vegetable oil (but solid vegetable oils are fine) because it will leave a sticky surface and the pan will not be properly seasoned.
3. Put the pan in the oven. In 15 minutes, remove the pan & pour out any excess grease. Place the pan back in the oven and bake for 2 hours.

Repeating this process several times is recommended as it will help create a stronger "seasoning" bond.

Also, when you put the pan into service, it is recommended to use it initially for foods high in fat, such as bacon or foods cooked with fat, because the grease from these foods will help strengthen the seasoning.

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: Quintessential Kate
Replied on: Jan 24 2009 07:54:22 AM
Message:

Ha......Texas is warm one day and freezing the next. This morning when I woke up the temp was 58 degrees here in the Tyler area...and 33 degrees in Dallas, which is 90 miles to the west. Now 2 1/2 hours later it's hovering just above freezing here. The last two days it's been beautiful....mid 70's and I had windows open all day long both days.
I have been using cheese cloth, with the mind set that the weave is a bit looser and will allow more incorporation. She's getting sour...just a little slowly. Another factor that I think is affecting "Ma" is that I keep it on the cool side in the house....
All in all, I'm happy with the results so far....and looking foward to a more sour start by next Friday. Yesterday was my day for "Ma" to fast....and she was very happy to be fed this morning. Just checked her a while ago and she's bubbling like crazy.
Looking forward to next Friday so I can bake another loaf. As I said, next loaf will be no knead.
Talk to all of you later.
Ciao, Kate

Heart of Texas
Chapter
AKA: Hot Farmgirl #234
http://quintessentialkate.blogspot.com

Today is my best day!


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 24 2009 08:44:21 AM
Message:

Well I know I am jumping the gun, but "Ma" looked so healthy and alive today- I just had to put her to work. So she is currently making a batch of white bread from a recipe book I have about sourdough. We'll see if she rises to the task! (pun intended!) I also fixed her a nice slurry of flour and water to rehabilitate the left over starter. Like I said...I know I am jumping the gun- but I really wanted yummy bread today!

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: gramadinah
Replied on: Jan 24 2009 09:26:34 AM
Message:

I am on the sourdough bread train too. The first loaf tasted great but after 8 hours of rise and being baked it got feed to the dogs the crust was a great tooth cleaner. The inside was very dense but had a great sour flavor.


So here we go.

Diana

Farmgirl Sister #273


Reply author: Buffalomary
Replied on: Jan 24 2009 09:45:22 AM
Message:

Hey Julie, I have a quick question. I'm only one person so that pancake recipe is more than I want hanging around (I'll just want to eat it all!) So if I cut the recipe in half, do I go with 1 egg or 2?

Thanks!

Buffalomary
Farmgirl Sister #293

You can take the farmer's daughter off the farm but you can't take the farm out of the farmer's daughter!!

Please visit me at my blog: http://buffalomaryscorner.blogspot.com


Reply author: TheresaB
Replied on: Jan 24 2009 10:15:09 AM
Message:

Well, the Queen is resting quietly and there's my first attempt at sourdough bread rising (I hope) in an enameled cast iron dutch oven in the warm kitchen. Keepin' my fingers crossed!

Theresa in Colorado
Proud Farmgirl Sister #124
www.thegypsysdaughter.etsy.com
www.thegypsysdaughter.blogspot.com

"I see skies of blue, clouds of white, the bright blessed day, the dark sacred night, and I think to myself, "What a Wonderful World!" ~ Louis Armstrong


Reply author: MaryJane
Replied on: Jan 24 2009 10:25:45 AM
Message:

I'm just polishing off a page of 'caring for cast iron' tips for the April/May issue of our magazine. In it, I'll tell you how to bring new life to old cast iron as well as season a brand new pan. In the meantime, here's a short version of how I oil/season a new pan:

Rub a thin, even coating of organic shortening, unsalted animal fat, or edible coconut oil inside and out. Good quality salt-free lard works well and can be purchased in most grocery stores. (Oils high in saturated fats are less likely to become rancid. Although bacon grease isn't all that great because it's so "dirty" and can turn rancid easy.)

Once it's oiled, place the pan upside down (this will keep the oil from pooling up) on the top shelf of your oven with a foil-covered baking sheet on the bottom shelf to catch any drips. Bake for one hour at 350 degrees, then turn the oven off and leave the pan inside until it's cool. When you pull it out, the surface will shine.

For the next seven times you use it, treat your cast iron to fatty foods that deepen the seasoning and enhance its nonstick surface.

More details soon!!!!

P.S. We had more involved directions on page 66 of our She's a Keeper MJF magazine issue, Summer 2008.


MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 24 2009 10:38:24 AM
Message:

Mary I would suggest 1 egg rather than two. If you use two you will get a denser rather than fluffy pancake.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: gramadinah
Replied on: Jan 24 2009 1:41:49 PM
Message:

Ronna on the second rise do you cover with damp towel too.

Diana

Farmgirl Sister #273


Reply author: Quintessential Kate
Replied on: Jan 24 2009 2:19:03 PM
Message:

Gramadinah...
I made Ronna's sourdough recipe yesterday....and on the second rise I just covered it with a dry light cotton dish towel and it did great.
Ciao, Kate

Heart of Texas
Chapter
AKA: Hot Farmgirl #234
http://quintessentialkate.blogspot.com

Today is my best day!


Reply author: brightmeadow
Replied on: Jan 24 2009 2:20:39 PM
Message:

Yikes! THere's 15 pages in this topic! Forgive me for not reading through all of them, hope this hasn't already been mentioned.

Does anyone know the secret for keeping homemade bread, sourdough or commercial-yeast, soft for more than a day? My husband and I enjoy homemade bread but we can't seem to use it up fast enough to keep it from getting hard and crunchy. Putting it in a plastic bag may slow it down for a day or so, but sometimes leads to mold, where at least if it dries out I can crush it and use it for bread crumbs.

But I'd rather use it in sandwiches!!!!!! Help!!!


You shall eat the fruit of the labor of your hands - You shall be happy and it shall be well with you. -Psalm 128.2
Visit my blog at http://brightmeadowfarms.blogspot.com ,web site store at http://www.watkinsonline.com/fish or my homepage at http://home.earthlink.net/~brightmeadow


Reply author: kristin sherrill
Replied on: Jan 24 2009 3:02:37 PM
Message:

I am going to get started in the morning! I am so exited about finally finding the King Arthur organic flout at our fancy organic store in Chatt. But it was almost $9.00! Good grief! I hope to gradually add my whole wheat berries soon.

So can I use my crock insert of the slow cooker to rise the dough in? Someone has probably asked this but there are so many pages I'll be here for days reading them all, so thought I'd ask again. I read somewhere that they put it in the oven to heat it up then wrapped the bowl in a towel with the dough in it.

Kris

Turn your face to the sun and the shadows fall behind you. Maori proverb


Reply author: K-Falls Farmgirl
Replied on: Jan 24 2009 3:12:47 PM
Message:

Kristin. I am using one right now.. Seems to be working fine it is a ceramic lined crock...

http://www.k-fallsfarmgirl.blogspot.com/
Come visit the barn at http://barndoorcreations.blogspot.com/
Cheryl
Farmgirl #309
"If you don't like something, change it. If you can't change it, change your attitude." Maya Angelou


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 24 2009 3:17:45 PM
Message:

Well my "hasty bread" as I am calling it since I used 3 day old starter rose slowly over 4 hours and is now done baking. It tastes fabulous and rose quite a bit more than I had realized. I think once the starter is fully mature it will have lots more air bubbles in the bread but I am VERY pleased with it!

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 24 2009 4:48:38 PM
Message:

Brenda - allow your bread to cool completely and try storing it in an airtight container. It will be best eaten in the first 24 hours though.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: Amie C.
Replied on: Jan 24 2009 6:01:04 PM
Message:

Alee, you must be some kind of yeast charmer. I tried baking with my full-week-old mother today and got absolutely no rise out of it. Flat as a pancake. I let the dough sit for something like 30 hours, and finally had to give up. And that was with the oven turned on to warm the kitchen up from its usual 60 degrees.

My mother has seemed fat and happy all week, so I'm going to give her another chance next weekend. But after that, as the saying goes, "If you don't work, you don't eat." Sorry, Ma, it's hard times all over and organic flour don't come cheap.


Reply author: kristin sherrill
Replied on: Jan 24 2009 6:18:38 PM
Message:

Has anyone done a survey yet to see who's had good luck with their dough and who hasn't? I'd love to know the percentage of no rise at all to a great rise. Just a thought.

I did make my whole wheat bread today in my new Zojurushi bread maker and the dough rose very fast in it even in my cold kitchen. I also noticed it has a sour dough setting. I'll have to experiment with it and see if I can mix it up in the machine and let it rise in there.

I also have had a hard time with my rolls getting hard after a few days. My bread will be fine for several days, even in the fridge in summer. That's why I'm trying this new machine. All my friends here have it and their rolls and bread are so soft for days. I do think it's the whole temperature thing though. But the bread doesn't really last too long before it's all eaten.

Amie, was this your first try?

Turn your face to the sun and the shadows fall behind you. Maori proverb


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 24 2009 6:36:43 PM
Message:

Guys you need to remember we are working with sourdough. Sourdough is typically a firmer bread. It can be "tender" but if you are expecting Wonder bread it will be NOTHING like that. You should be getting firm yet tender bread that is crusty around the edges and chewy in the center. Even the "French" bread I've recently purchased in the bakery of the grocery store is nothing like it should be!

Someone earlier mentioned getting a doughy middle. Try reducing the amount of liquid in the recipe just a bit next time you bake. That should help. Also you might want to invest in a thermometer for your oven. If you oven is running too hot that could also cause that issue.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: Buffalomary
Replied on: Jan 24 2009 8:44:17 PM
Message:

Ta Da!!!!



Oh my, oh my, oh my!! Such heavenly scents came wafting from my humble kitchen tonight! Yeah!! This week is so much better than last. Grandma always told me that mother gets better with age. Something I did different this time was to warm up my cast iron pot before I put the dough in to rise. I then left it sitting over the burner with the oven vent and occasionally barely turned the oven on for about 10-15 minutes and it created just enough heat. I can already see this one loaf is not going to last very long!

Thank you, MaryJane! You're the greatest!!

Buffalomary
Farmgirl Sister #293

You can take the farmer's daughter off the farm but you can't take the farm out of the farmer's daughter!!

Please visit me at my blog: http://buffalomaryscorner.blogspot.com


Reply author: Huckelberrywine
Replied on: Jan 24 2009 9:23:48 PM
Message:

Wow! Congratulations Alee and Mary. Your breads look so great! Thanks for the pictures.

We make a difference. http://huckleberrywine.blogspot.com


Reply author: gramax18
Replied on: Jan 24 2009 9:30:37 PM
Message:

Mary,
Your bread looks wonderful.
I set my bread last night and baked it this morning. It ook 40 minutes to get the temp up. But it turned out better than last weeks. I also took out 2/3 cup this morning to make half the recipe of the pancakes. I just cut the recipe in thirds and it worked very well. I have enough for more tommor morning.
This whole sourdough thing is lots of fun.

Happy baking!

Elinor


Reply author: gramax18
Replied on: Jan 24 2009 9:32:32 PM
Message:

Oops! I ment that I cut the recipe in thirds not half.

Elinor


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 24 2009 9:43:27 PM
Message:

I always make sure to have my bread materials at about 70 degrees before I start. Also any liquids which go in are warmed up too. My bread is always nice and warm when I knead it (which using MaryJane's recipes you don't need to knead). I think that helps give the yeast a fighting chance. I also try to keep my mother warm (she is living in my office where I have a space heater going and that seems to keep her happy. I also always feed her with warm water. I think the warmth is the key.

My mother has already recovered from me "robbing" her this morning I left about a cup worth of starter in the jar and made a 2 cup replacement mix. She was in the warm kitchen all day and I can already see bubbles all the way through! I can't wait to feed her tomorrow!

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: Buffalomary
Replied on: Jan 24 2009 10:00:22 PM
Message:

Oh, I forgot to mention that I also warmed up the honey before I added it. It was sorta crystalized and wouldn't pour so I warmed it up. That probably helped as well.

Buffalomary
Farmgirl Sister #293

You can take the farmer's daughter off the farm but you can't take the farm out of the farmer's daughter!!

Please visit me at my blog: http://buffalomaryscorner.blogspot.com


Reply author: Ronna
Replied on: Jan 24 2009 10:46:43 PM
Message:

Kate, thanks for answering Diana's question on covering the bread during the second rise. I do so much without thinking, sometimes hard to remember every step/tip to tell someone else.
MaryJane was faster than me with the "upside down" tip for seasoning cast iron. I pulled 4 dutch ovens out of the back corner of the cupboard yesterday and 3 of them are quite "crusty" inside and out. Really need to be hit with a wire brush to loosen all that and then seasoned again. Bought them that way and just never took the time or effort to clean them up yet. I cooked breaded pork tenderloin and fried potatoes with onions tonight and each cast iron skillet only needed a quick wipe with a paper towel to get the crumbs out. A well seasoned pan is worth it's weight in gold! If I do need to wash mine, it's a quick swish with soapy water, rinse and dry, also set them on the stove upside down to get the residual heat from the burner and be sure they are dry. Never soak a cast iron pan or you'll need to start the seasoning process over again. The ones I use all the time live in the oven, just habit from the days of pilot lights and to be sure they never got rusty from moisture. Besides, I have way too many of everything in my kitchen and it's just an extra cupboard to me.
Glad some of you are having success with your sourdough bread adventures. The longer you use the starter, the more flavor it will develop. As you feed it and build up the amount a bit, toss a half cup or so in your next quick bread recipe and see the extra flavor it adds.


Reply author: whimseyc
Replied on: Jan 25 2009 06:11:36 AM
Message:

I was so excited when I read how easy it was to begin a starter. Went and bought all the ingredients. The first three days it worked great. The morning of the 4th day it looked a little watery on top but I added the water and flour and stirred and then it looked fine. By Saturday it looked really watery on top and not bubbling exactly. I still removed two cups and made my bread. Let it rise all day in a warm spot and it still looked like two grapefruit sized lumps when I went to bake it. Those loaves would have killed someone had you lobbed one at somebody! So what did I do wrong? The only thing I can think is that the starter also has to stay warm - the article didn't mention that though. And the kitchen counter where I kept it is next to an outside wall so is a little cooler that elsewhere in my kitchen. Could that have been the problem? I haven't tried again yet. Thanks for anyone who can help - I'd still like to have a successful starter.

Sometimes you just have to take the leap, and build your wings on the way down.


Reply author: Quintessential Kate
Replied on: Jan 25 2009 06:47:54 AM
Message:

I know I've said this before... but I LOVE this topic. I have learned so much through this and I thank all of you.

I have several comments....so here goes.

Ronna,
You're welcome! I never want to step on anyone's toes...or be a "buttinski", but I saw the post and since I had just made your recipe...I responded. AND what a GREAT recipe it is. Thank you sooooo much for sharing it with us.

Paper or plastic?? I think, waaaaay back in the single digit pages of this thread, MaryJane mentioned paper sacks for storing our breads. (And again....I don't want to be putting words in someone's mouth...so set me straight). Anyway, I am using a paper grocery bag. I have used plastic ziplock bags to store my "breadmachine bread" and because our breads have no preservatives, they start growing a "beard" in a relatively short amount of time, unlike the "Frankenstein bread" we buy in the grocery store.
I like the brown paper bag. Yes, the cut end of the bread is dry, but once it's cut off, there's a soft, chewy slice of bread just begging to be eaten. I have a nice sharp bread knife and just slice off less than 1/4"....and set that thin piece on a rack, and once it's completely dry I crumble it up and put it in my "breadcrumb jar". If you are going to make the breadcrumbs...make sure it's absolutely dry before adding to your other crumbs...or one day you'll pull out your breadcrumbs and find a nice beard growing in the jar.

And...one more question/comment! Does anyone know the record number of pages on any given topic here at MJF???? Just curious, as this one is growing by leaps and bounds everyday.

Okay, okay, okay....one more thing. I was adding up my critters in my head.....2 schnauzers, 3 rescued cats, 2 cockatiels, one 50 gallon guppy aquarium, 2 beta bowls....and "Ma". These are all beings that need attention each and every day....they depend on me for their nourishment. They all know that I will keep them safe and healthy....and they the four legged ones follow me around all day long. Oh....I'm so glad "Ma" stays on the counter in the kitchen. I LOVE them all!!!!!



This is Jill....my toy schnauzer. She's a cutie pie and a JOY. She will soon be 3 and weighs almost 7 pounds.

Ciao,
Kate

Heart of Texas
Chapter
AKA: Hot Farmgirl #234
http://quintessentialkate.blogspot.com

Today is my best day!


Reply author: TheresaB
Replied on: Jan 25 2009 07:26:37 AM
Message:

My first sourdough loaf turned out divine! It's already gone. Aesthetically, it wasn't very pleasing as it stuck like mad to the enameled cast iron (even though I oiled it prior) and the pan was too big so it spread out like a free form loaf. Looks aside, it tasted wonderful and I am so happy with it. Decided I will feed the Queen more and bake twice this week.

Thank you all, I love this thread!

Theresa in Colorado
Proud Farmgirl Sister #124
www.thegypsysdaughter.etsy.com
www.thegypsysdaughter.blogspot.com

"I see skies of blue, clouds of white, the bright blessed day, the dark sacred night, and I think to myself, "What a Wonderful World!" ~ Louis Armstrong


Reply author: Amie C.
Replied on: Jan 25 2009 08:13:00 AM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by kristin sherrill

Has anyone done a survey yet to see who's had good luck with their dough and who hasn't? I'd love to know the percentage of no rise at all to a great rise. Just a thought.

[...]

Amie, was this your first try?




This was my first try with the MJF starter. I made sourdough bread last weekend from a starter I had begun earlier with commercial yeast. Sourdough bread seems to be a cultural trend this winter! That bread turned out quite well.

I'm not terribly worried about my failure...I suppose the wild yeast may take longer to get established and I'll have to work on some kind of trick to keep the mother warmer. I'm not home during the day, so I can't move it around and adjust it.

I tried using the electric-blanket cat bed that we got as a Christmas present. Mr. Stubbs won't go anywhere near it, and I thought it might as well get used for something. But my mother is too bulky to tuck in where the warmth stays. I may try our heating pad next, but I'm afraid of killing the yeast off.


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 25 2009 08:37:06 AM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by willowtreecreek

Remember that sourdough starter is a living organism. It is made of wild yeasts that have been captured from the air. The starter will consume starch in the flour, and it produces alcohol (hooch) at the end of the process. The starter will be like a smooth batter when you feed it. As it digests the new flour you have added it will bubble and froth. When it has "eaten" all the available food it will start to produce hooch, the liquid layer you'll see on the top.
When the hooch builds up, and there's no more bubbling activity, it's time to feed the starter. The Hooch will build up more as the week goes on. when you add your flour and water in the morning you can stir it back in. It is a natural process and will not hurt anything.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com




Jill - above is an explination about the liquid on top. I am currently working with three starters and 2 produced a lot of hooch and 1 produced none. If you get a lot - try adding a tablespoon or two of flour to your feeding the next morning to see if that helps a little.

Many of the girls who had hard loafs last week baked beautiful ones this week. Remember that your starter needs to build up natural yeast. I'm certain if you keep at it your loafs next week will be even better. Depending on your air quality in your home you will have varying amount of natural yeasts. Your starter may just need to develop more.

Also - free form loafs or loafs cooked in a cast iron pan that doesnot touch the dough will tend to "spread out" rather than "rise" That is just the nature of the dough. If your pan is too large add some extra flour when you are mixing so your dough isn't quite as "gooey" .

KATE - I read several resources that suggest paper bags as well and that suggest you turn the loaf cut side down. That is how I plan to store mine unless I notice it REALLY drying out like someone else did and then I may try the airtight container.

I am baking three loafs today. I am doing 1 in the cast iron and two on stoneware baking sheet. I was gonna give the enamled cast iron a try but it is full of Chili for lunch today!

Here are some pics of my loafs rising.




Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 25 2009 08:39:32 AM
Message:

Hi Jill! What the starter is trying to do is grow wild yeasts and bacterias. According to "Ask a Scientist" The optimum yeast growing temperature is between 86 to 97 degrees Fahrenheit (30-37 Celsius), though 70-75 will work. So your starter might be in hibernation if it is closer to 60 degrees where it is growing and you might need to find somewhere a little warmer to keep her so she can grow a bit more.



Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 25 2009 08:40:33 AM
Message:

Oh and I forgot to mention- Doug had named our starter "Ma Stonefeld" because he says that sounds like an old timey name! LOL

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 25 2009 08:49:07 AM
Message:

Alee you want to be careful about your STARTER being in a location that warm. The starter is really "collecting" yeasts and feeding. Keeping the temperature of your starter this high could cause bacteria to grow in your starter. The starter itself is better kept at temperatures below 80 with 60-70 being the optimum temperature. The dough on the other hand does need a warm place to rise and between 70-80 degrees is perfect for this.

Jill - just incase you missed it I reposted about the "hooch" (liquid on top) at the bottom of page 16.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: Ronna
Replied on: Jan 25 2009 08:49:07 AM
Message:

Your starter can be called whatever you want, but actually a mother is a chunk of dough kept from one baking to the next and a starter is thinner. I like mine the consistency of pancake batter, some keep it thinner or thicker as they choose.
An alternative to a paper bag is putting the loaf cut side down on a wood board, pizza stone, unglazed pottery or some such that will allow it to breathe and any excess moisture to be absorbed. Be sure it's totally cold from baking-which it should be if you've waited to cut into it. If you cut too soon, and it's hard to wait, you may have a doughy slice when it's actually baked but not left to cool.
Have to go back and read, think I had a couple other suggestions.


Reply author: Ronna
Replied on: Jan 25 2009 08:56:43 AM
Message:

I believe the longest thread on this forum is Aprons and more in the
Stitching area. And I'm guilty of adding to it.
Julie, yes, too much warmth will allow on overgrowth of the wrong bacteria. This summer, when the kitchen is hot and not much baking done, those who have kept their starter may need/want to keep it in the frige. Only takes about an hour to come to room temp when you're ready to use it again.
I started to count the number of bread books I have and it's a couple dozen, but just a handful devoted to sourdough only. I buy all those when I see them in the thrift shops to share with others.


Reply author: wooliespinner
Replied on: Jan 25 2009 09:08:47 AM
Message:

I was so excited yesterday. I started my mother last Sunday. I made my first loaf of bread in a 2 quart dutch oven Saturday and it rose wonderfully !!! It rose so well that after 6 hours I baked it. The crust was thin and crunchy.....everyone loved it. This is so cool.

I started my mother on Sunday with unbleached white flour. Then from there on out I mixed half white flour and half homeground Montana gold wheat. The experiment worked out great. I was amazed at how sour the bread tasted after just one week.

Today I added 3 times as much water and flour mixture(unbleached white and Montana gold) so we can have more than one loaf a week. I can't wait to try the cin/raisin bread. I didn't use organic flour when I started my mother. All I had was a good unbleached flour and my own homeground. I was worried it wouldn't work but went ahead and tried it anyway. So was glad it worked and I think adding the homeground really helped too. Finding organic flour is not easy and the stores aren't close that have it. When I venture out will pick some up. Until then will just keep working with what I have.

Hope everyone ends up with great bread.Those that have not had good luck yet keep trying. I think you will eventually get some wonderful bread.

Linda

Raspberry Run Farm
Nubian Dairy Goats


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 25 2009 12:36:18 PM
Message:

Hi Ladies!

As you will see in my previous post, I did mention that 70-75 degrees works
great for sourdough, which is what the average room temperature is.

However, I am concerned that bacteria is getting a bad rap. Yeasts cause the
bread to rise, but the local bacteria is what gives each sourdough its
individual flavor. For instance, the local bacteria in San Francisco (that
makes San Francisco Sourdough Bread famous) has been given its own name-
Lactobacillus San Francisco.

The symbiotic relationship between yeast and certain bacterias--especially
the universally prevalent Lactobacillus strains, creates a PH Balance that
is unreceptive to bad bacteria unless the PH balance gets disrupted. When
this happens you will know it right away. There will be a really foul odor,
and often times black bacteria or pink or even red bacteria grows. Of course
if you start seeing green, purple or any other color other than tan in the
starter, you have some sort of mold or fungus growing. However the hooch or
liquid that rises to the top after it's eaten all its food can be clear,
yellowish, or even gray which is all perfectly normal. Here are just a few
of the links that I found useful.

The higher temperatures are fine for sour dough. The summer that I did sour
dough, it was fine in my unconditioned kitchen with temperatures in the
eighty to ninety degree range. Also if you consider the fact that sour dough
has been around since ancient Egyptian times, long before air conditioning,
it would have had to work at warm temperatures during the summer months.

Here are some links to my sources with a short explanation of what I took
from each source below:

http://www.schoolofbaking.com/sourdough_tips.htm
International School of baking- recommends 85 degrees temperatures while
feeding sour dough

http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/bio99/bio99693.htm
Ask a scientist- specific temperature range

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FqxkMqsEQI0
Quick You Tube Video of Food Network's Alton Brown (science cooking)
explaining Sour Dough and Ph level

http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cookbook:Sourdough_Starter
Has a section about temperature



Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: kristin sherrill
Replied on: Jan 25 2009 1:40:07 PM
Message:

I started my "momma" this morning! (That's mine's name) I was reading alot here just now and am glad. It was so cold here that my well was frozen so I used bottled spring water from the fridge. So I put it in a small pan on low to get the chill off. I am glad I did now. So it's sitting on my stove in the kitchen. It is about 65 in there if I'm not cooking. I had to peek under the cloth (I hope she doesn't mind) and there are bubbles already!! I sure hope this works.

So not only is this fun and hopefully I'll get some great bread, but it's also educational. It's like a science lesson every time I get on here. I do know certain bacteria is good for us, but I guess too much isn't. That's why I don't have any anti-bacterial soaps in my house. And so each house probably has all this different stuff floating around in it. If we had a taste of everyone's bread from all over this country, it would all taste different because of all the different bacterias and yeasts. That's so amazing. Thanks for all this info.

Kris

Turn your face to the sun and the shadows fall behind you. Maori proverb


Reply author: gramadinah
Replied on: Jan 25 2009 2:13:33 PM
Message:

So mom is resting nicely I have attempted bread twice the first time the dogs got it the second was very tough crust and dense inside but we ate it. I keep forgetting to ask on the days I bake bread do I feed mom and then take out my starter or not feed her at all that day?
I will have a loaf of bread if it takes forever.

Diana

Farmgirl Sister #273


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 25 2009 2:24:22 PM
Message:

Hi Diana!

On the day you bake you don't feed your starter, you just bake with it. That way all the by products of your yeast eating the starch gets captured in the bread. The by products are gasses that cause the bubbling/rise. Then the next day you start feeding the starter again.

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: Ronna
Replied on: Jan 25 2009 2:32:53 PM
Message:

During extra cold or hot weather in our ancestors day, the mother dough was kept in the keg of flour to insulate it from extremes. That's how the wagon train cooks kept it safe during their journeys west too.
Diana, my suggestion is to feed the starter the night before you plan to bake and it will be ready for use in the morning. Give it time to absorb all the new "food", which is the flour you add.
Linda, better to add more water and flour several times to increase the amount of starter rather than feed it a huge amount at once. It can be fed a couple times a day if that's your goal. Books will say to pour off half your starter if you are just feeding and don't use it, to keep the levels of the original starter from being overwhelmed. I have never done that, other than to pour off what I am sending to others. I also have some dried to be sure I never lose this strain again. Some share with dried, I usually send wet even though it would be cheaper to just put it in an envelope. To dry it, use a rubber spatula to spread it out very thin on parchment and when it's completely dry, crumble it and store in an airtight jar or ziploc bag. Or, when my container gets crusty and ugly, I transfer the starter to a new one and let the remainder dry until it falls of the sides and can be dumped out for saving. I use a cereal box size tupperware with the pour spout lid, that way I can let it have some air on the counter and still seal it tight for after feeding and storage in the fridge.
Yes, MaryJane keeps hers on the counter at all times, it's just a matter of preference and I don't use mine regularly.


Reply author: ennoid
Replied on: Jan 25 2009 2:53:55 PM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by Alee

Hi Diana!

On the day you bake you don't feed your starter, you just bake with it. That way all the by products of your yeast eating the starch gets captured in the bread. The by products are gasses that cause the bubbling/rise. Then the next day you start feeding the starter again.

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com



Oops nevermind...I deleted this post after reading Alee's post below so as not to confuse anyone. Thanks Alee.


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 25 2009 3:29:29 PM
Message:

Here is what MaryJane said on page 2. The Seventh Day for the starter, if you are following the schedule in the magazine, is Saturday. So Saturday you take out your starter for baking and set the mother starter a side. Then you bake and start feeding her on Sunday again.

I think this is an old time feeding/baking pattern so it leaves Sunday free of baking (which left time for church or socialization) but you still have fresh bread.

quote:
Originally posted by MaryJane

Here's what it says:

On the 7th day, your mother will be ready. It should have bubbles and smell pleasantly sour--like stout beer. In the morning (Saturday), spoon 2 cups of your mother into a mixing bowl. Then cover your mother (don't add anything to her today--it's her day of rest) but take the 2 cups you took out and turn it into bread using one of my recipes RIGHT THEN AND THERE (SATURDAY), not Sunday. Take a deep breath and put your thinking cap on.

I've asked WILLOWTREECREEK (Juli) to get up to speed on my "bread the MaryJane" way so she can help me answer your questions. (She's darn good in the kitchen and good with instructions.) In the meantime, carefully read what I've written so far. Most of your questions are easily answered in the link that is in the first post on this thread.

Happy Bread Making!


MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~




Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: Celticheart
Replied on: Jan 25 2009 3:32:09 PM
Message:

I'm posting a couple of my favorite sourdough recipes for you all to try. I don't have any going right now but it's certainly tempting. Might need to start some going tonight. Just a couple of comments first. I've been baking with sourdough for oh....about 35 years, give or take. My mama said to replace whatever you take out when you take it out, that is if you are using 1 cup of starter you immediately replace it with 1 cup flour and 1 cup water. I keep mine in the refrigerator most of the time if I won't be using it much but I do leave it out for 3-4 days after adding to it. It's much more forgiving than you think. Using sourdough does require thinking ahead. As you've discovered, it's not fast food.

Old Fashion Sourdough Biscuits--some of you struggling with the bread might want to try these. They are great. More like yeast rolls than biscuits really.

1/2 cup of starter
1 cup water or milk
2 1/2 cups flour
3/4 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon of sugar or honey
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1 tablespoon cooking oil

Mix sourdough starter, water or milk and 1 cup of flour in a large bowl. Let stand overnight or all day at room temperature to rise.

When ready to bake biscuits, beat in 1 cup of flour. Combine the salt, sugar, baking powder and soda into the remaining 1/2 cup of flour and add to the bowl. Mix together and turn out onto a floured surface. Knead 10-15 times. Roll out to 1/2" thickness. Cut out the biscuits and place into a greased cast iron skillet. Brush tops with cooking oil, cover with a cloth and let rise in a warm place for 30-40 minutes. Bake at 375 degrees for 30-35 minutes. Makes about 14 biscuits. Serve hot. The texture hardens when they are cool.


Sourdough Pancakes--these are what buttermilk pancakes want to be when they grow up

2 cups flour
2 cups lukewarm water
1/2 cup sourdough starter

Add flour and water to starter in a large bowl. Beat until smooth and let stand overnight in a warm place. In the morning, remove 1/2 cup of this and put it into your regular starter. Now to the large bowl add:

2 tablespoons sugar or honey
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
3 tablespoons of cooking oil
2 eggs

Mix together well and fold in:

1/2 teaspoon baking soda, dissolved in 1 tablespoon water.

Don't stir much after the soda has been added. Cook on a hot, greased griddle or skillet. Makes 4-6 servings.

Enjoy!




"Nature always has the last laugh." Mrs. Greenthumbs


Reply author: country roads
Replied on: Jan 25 2009 3:34:51 PM
Message:

Yesterday I baked my first loaf in a cast iton bread pan...I ended up with a brick! After 9 1/2 hours it had hardly risen at all. The outside was really hard and I'm not sure if the inside was doughy or just extra moist. The dog ate the hard crust and the chickens were very happy to take care of the soft inside. I'm hoping next week goes better. I'm going to try a different pan and lower the baking temp some. I fed my mother this morning and she is doing wonderful.

Take care, Melissa.

Farmgirl # 352

~Think happy thoughts~


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 25 2009 3:59:19 PM
Message:

Melissa - it really seems like a lot of people had similar results with their first baking. I am really thinking it is that the yeasts in the starter just aren't developed yet. Most of the girls who kept it going and baked again this week reported much better results. I baked three loaves today using three different mothers. One did not rise at all and two rose but were a little on the "doughy" side. I used a thermometer and baked to the appropriate temperature. They are very tasty though. Most of us have been experiencing cold temperatures OUTSIDE right now which will also drastically reduce the amount of local yeast in the air. Keep at it! Those that have had great results on the second week. It just needs time to develop!

Marcia - Thanks so much for the recipes!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com


Reply author: wooliespinner
Replied on: Jan 25 2009 5:12:04 PM
Message:

I had a question.

Why do you not feed the "mother culture" on the day you bake ? And would it hurt to feed it that day since you just took out so much? I just didn't understand this concept and wondered if anyone knew why.

Thanks
Linda

Raspberry Run Farm
Nubian Dairy Goats


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 25 2009 5:38:15 PM
Message:

Linda- it wouldn't hurt to feed your starter every day. When you follow MaryJane's method, her recipes call for 2 cups starter. So buy feeding for 6 days at 1/3 cup volume each day (per her instructions) You have two cups of "extra" starter by each Saturday or seventh day baking (following MaryJane's schedule, Saturday is the 7th day, but some like me started on a different day). By following this schedule you will always have the same amount of base starter after you have baked. If you feed everyday you will, over time, increase the amount of your starter base. This can be helpful if you want to work up to baking more each week, sharing with friends every couple of months etc.

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 25 2009 5:38:21 PM
Message:

Hmmm Linda. I'm not sure! Let me look into that. Maybe Ronna will know. Shes done a lot of reading on sourdough.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 25 2009 5:40:01 PM
Message:

Thanks Alee!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: K-Falls Farmgirl
Replied on: Jan 25 2009 6:05:13 PM
Message:



This is what I did with the leftover first flat sourdough bread. It had great flavor just didn't rise. So I made seasoned croutons

http://www.k-fallsfarmgirl.blogspot.com/
Come visit the barn at http://barndoorcreations.blogspot.com/
Cheryl
Farmgirl #309
"If you don't like something, change it. If you can't change it, change your attitude." Maya Angelou


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 25 2009 6:59:01 PM
Message:

Great idea cheryl! There are lots of methods but here is a quick and easy way to make croutons.

Preheat oven to 300.
Slice and cube your bread. For 4 cups of bread crumbs you will need about 3/4 of a stick of melted butter or about 1/3 cup of olive oil. Mix in your favorite spices such as garlic or onion powder, basil,oregano etc. and stir. Pour the mixture over the bread cubes and toss until they are well coated. Spread the cubes onto a baking sheet. Place in the oven, stirring occasionally until they are brown and crunchy. Store in an airtight container in the fridge and they will last quite a while.

I have also cooked mine in a skillet before when I needed them in a hurry. Just watch careful so they don't burn.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Ronna
Replied on: Jan 25 2009 11:00:50 PM
Message:

Linda, keep it simple...after you use the starter, feed it to replenish what you've taken out. You don't want to forget and next time you want to use it, you don't have enough to use and also set aside for the next baking.
Yes, I've read a lot of bread baking books over the years, but nothing can replace first hand knowledge of actually baking it, which I've done for 50 years. From being on several online bread lists, I think I've read of just about every scenario possible. Practice makes perfect, isn't that what the teachers say?


Reply author: Quintessential Kate
Replied on: Jan 26 2009 06:04:50 AM
Message:

I have to whole heartedly agree with Ronna about the KIS....Keep It Simple. This bread making time should be a JOY! I am new to the process myself, but we have some very knowledgable ladies here on our forum.

What I have gleaned is this...
The collecting of/ build up of yeast is going to be different for all of us. I KNOW that it is collecting slowly here in my house. I think due to several reasons...one being that right after Thanksgiving I became very sick with pneumonia and was on some very UGLY and heavy duty antibiotics (and it had been years since I had taken an antibiotic.....usually I refuse to take them...but this was a matter of take them or you'll end up in the hospital or dead. Anyway you look at it, it was a bitter pill to swallow....and yes, maybe a pun was intended). And then almost three weeks ago I was having a simple procedure...cervical spine selective epidural at one of our premiere hospitals..and upon returning to recovery the nurse lowered the gurney and my left ring finger was almost amputated ( mind you, I was sedated for the procedure, not completely out but sedate)......so I was put on a 7 day course of antibiotics.) Anyway,I guess my point is that even though I was consuming the antibiotics, I imagine my body is releasing the "overkill". I am convinced in my little pea brain that this has had an affect on the yeast in my home.

Secondly, I keep my house on the cool side....because of the dreaded hot flashes...but for the life of me I don't know why!!! It can be 32 degrees outside...me standing out there in my jammies....and I'll break out into a sweat. I know it is a passing thing.....but COME ON!!!

And last, but not least, since moving to East Texas from Arizona, both my hubby and I have been plagued with allergies....so when we renovated our sweet little house we put in a heavy duty air purifier on the new central heat and air system we installed. Electrostatic....sounds like a bug zapper. ( I love the fact that I have much less dusting to do....)

So here are some of my remedies.....
"Ma", my start, sits on top of my refrigerator where it's always a little warm.
I have turned off the air purifier for a while.
On pretty days.......like last Thursday and Friday which were in the mid to upper 70's, I opened windows...which is a normal activity for me.
And I think because I have been drinking not only Kombucha, but taking a pro-biotic, I have gotten my body back in a good place. ( Mind you, all of this is MY reasoning.....nothing scientific).

So here are my suggestions...
If your start is starting out a bit slow.......try Ronna's San Francisco Style Sourdough recipe for your first batch. And then on your second batch/week, use the no added yeast / no knead recipe that originally started this. I KNOW that my start has already grabbed more yeast....just by the way it looks and smells. So on Friday, which is my bake day (I am a bit behind a lot of you...and actually mixed up my start on a Saturday) I will make my first loaf of no knead per MaryJanes recipe....and I know it's gonna be GREAT!
Thanks for listening to me......
Ciao ladies,
Kate

Heart of Texas
Chapter
AKA: Hot Farmgirl #234
http://quintessentialkate.blogspot.com

Today is my best day!


Reply author: janiee
Replied on: Jan 26 2009 06:54:52 AM
Message:

Just wanted to report that I made my first loaf of bread this past Saturday and it turned out really good! Did not rise as much as I thought it would but the flavor was wonderful! my husband and i ate almost all of it as soon as it came out of the oven! In fact, he has now begun his own "mother" with a much larger amounts (as per the magazine) because he wants more bread on Saturdays...
janiee
farmgirl #390


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 26 2009 08:26:25 AM
Message:

That is great Janie!

I gave Nora one of my sour dough rolls this morning and she was running around with it taking big bites out of it. :D That makes a mom happy. Good fresh food and a kid that eats it!

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: gardenmaam
Replied on: Jan 26 2009 11:01:03 AM
Message:

Help welcome from anyone who has made the Mother ---
I have started the batch of MOTHER today (Mon). I notice that in the first part of the recipe it says on p. 67 to cover the Mother initially with a wet dishtowell. But later in the article it states to leave it covered with dry towell for the first week to breathe. After a week use the damp dishtowell with a plate on top of the towell and bowl. So, am a little unsure on how to start it today - the first day. Wet or dry towell? Any suggestions...or does it not matter.


Reply author: AuntPammy
Replied on: Jan 26 2009 11:22:39 AM
Message:

I think you are suppose to use a dry towel at the onset to allow mother to breathe.

I am soooo excited about this new project, I posted a couple of pictures on my blog to show the bubbling action I am getting. I have to admit that I am using new flour and spring water with mine and the results are amazing!

"Keep your face to the sunshine and you will never see the shadow." Helen Keller

www.auntpsalmostheaven.blogspot.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 26 2009 11:32:05 AM
Message:

Pam is right! It was a misprint. Dry towel for the first week!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: pearlgirl
Replied on: Jan 26 2009 12:16:50 PM
Message:

Oh, I am so glad to finally join this discussion!

I have tried sourdough only once before, using the method from the book Wild Fermentation by Katz. It was a complete failure. Looking back now I think if I had given it more time it may have worked, I only gave it four days and then made a great doorstop that I had let "rise" 24 hours, since that was what the book suggested.

Well, I was quite excited to find this method in the recent magazine and as soon as I could get the og flour and distilled water I started mother. That was Friday and I have been reading on here ever since trying to learn from everybody's successes and failures. From what I figued out I should probably just use my starter for pancakes this first week since our house is very cold here in West Michigan. I did put it in a warm kitchen cabinet though to keep it free from drafts and warm.

Now next week I hope to make the cinnamon raisin bread and I was wondering if I could use a 1 quart Pyrex dish or my little brown "bean pot" (it is meant for baked beans)to bake the loaf in. Below is a picture of both and I would appreciate some input. I also have a cast iron chicken fryer but I am afraid it is too wide to give it the upward motion it needs.




Favour is deceitful, and beauty is vain: but a woman that feareth the LORD, she shall be praised. Give her of the fruit of her hands; and let her own works praise her in the gates.
Pro 31:30,31

http://pearlsgleanings.blogspot.com/
http://www.pearlgirl901.etsy.com/


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 26 2009 12:23:03 PM
Message:

Lydia - I would suggest that you follow the parchment paper methond MaryJane suggested if you use eaither of those vessels. Someone tried an enameled cast iron dutch oven and mentioned it sticking. I think that is the major concern with those. Just use oiled parchment.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Firemama
Replied on: Jan 26 2009 5:49:15 PM
Message:

Made my first loaf today,it turned out very dense and didnt rise alot, but it still tastes dang good!!

Mama to 2
FarmGirl# 20

People can only make you feel inferior with your permission, and you dont have my permission......

Dont let the chain of love end with you.....

http://myfarmdreams.blogspot.com/


Reply author: Pearlsnjeans
Replied on: Jan 26 2009 7:35:20 PM
Message:

Made my first loaf last Saturday. It didn't rise much and was a bit doughy inside. However, the flavor was good. After reading all the information, I think my house may be too cold. I keep it at 68 degrees when I'm home, but the heat goes down to 60 degrees during the day. Not giving up - will try again this coming Saturday!

Vicki
Farmgirl Sister #120
Today well lived makes every yesterday a memory of happiness and every tomorrow a vision of hope.


Reply author: Ingrid
Replied on: Jan 27 2009 09:12:30 AM
Message:

I started the mother just after new years and followed all the instructions and it bubbled nicely and smelled great. I made a loaf of bread, it looked the way it was supposed to, I baked it on a baking stone, the outside turned out nice but when I cut into it the inside was completely raw. I bake regular bread once a week and have for years so not sure how to correct this. Have been playing with oven temperature and length of time baking and still no luck. Am having the same problem. Anyone out there have any suggestions?


Reply author: chessie
Replied on: Jan 27 2009 09:41:14 AM
Message:

Ingrid, did you use an instant read thermometer to take the inside temp before determining it was done?

www.edgehillherbfarm.com "where the name is bigger than the farm, but no one seems to mind"
blog http://edgehillherbfarmer.spaces.live.com/default.aspx?wa=wsignin1.0
happy farmgirl #89


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 27 2009 09:45:57 AM
Message:

Ingrid - I baked some on a stone last weekend and found that the out side browned really quickly. I would suggest turning your oven temperature down to about 375. You will also need to increase the baking time. I left mine about 15 minutes then check the temperature with an instant read. I then brushed the top with butter and kicked the temp up for about 10 minutes to allow the crust to brown.

You may also want to try increasing the amount of flour you use when you bake. It sounds like youve got too much moisture in the dough.

Let me know how it goes and we can do some more trouble shooting if needed!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: strawberyarn
Replied on: Jan 27 2009 09:52:10 AM
Message:

I have been reading this since I got the magazine. Back when there was only two pages of posts. I have my organic flour and distilled water and am ready to take the plunge. Being that I do not bake much I have learned much from all of your trials and thank you all for this. So it is onward, my only concern is that since I live in the mountians of Arizona it is still a bit chilly here, snow yesterday and my house may be a little cold but we will see. Thanks for all your hints and helps I'll keep reading and keep you posted of success or the dreaded failure. Christine


Reply author: AuntPammy
Replied on: Jan 27 2009 09:59:10 AM
Message:

Julie, just a quick thought. I have found that with these wetter doughs it is often easier to make two smaller loaves than try and make one great big loaf. I don't know just a thought.

Oh yeah...I've got a hoochy momma! I'm so proud of her, hee!hee!

"Keep your face to the sunshine and you will never see the shadow." Helen Keller

www.auntpsalmostheaven.blogspot.com


Reply author: K-Falls Farmgirl
Replied on: Jan 27 2009 10:00:00 AM
Message:

Welcome Christina, glad you are here and trying the bread. I think you living in Arizona won't be an issue. I am making my second loaf today. Actually I divided the dough into two smaller grapefruit size ones and am going to try baking themin small castIron skillets..We shall see how that goes. It has been cold here. It snowed yesterday morning very early and stayed cold all day. It is only about 24 right now & I have my bread rising in the window where the sun can do its work.. Goods luck with your bread.

http://www.k-fallsfarmgirl.blogspot.com/
Come visit the barn at http://barndoorcreations.blogspot.com/
Cheryl
Farmgirl #309
"If you don't like something, change it. If you can't change it, change your attitude." Maya Angelou


Reply author: Suzan
Replied on: Jan 27 2009 10:26:51 AM
Message:

I put my dough in my oven with just the light on - it seems to raise just fine there.


Reply author: Carrie M
Replied on: Jan 27 2009 11:10:58 AM
Message:

So many ladies are getting heavy, difficult to cut breads. I have found that kneading eliminates the dense, hard to cut loaves. Another option is to add less flour and just really stir it a lot to help increase the gluten. Also, whole wheat flours MUST be kneaded to work. If you don't want to knead then you'll have to use white flour througout the process. I stick with King Arthur and since I can't find the organic I've just used the regular unbleached ones. The bread flour works marvelously!!

If your dough gets real watery just add some extra flour.

If you want to make pancakes and don't want "flatties" just mix your starter with the milk or water in the recipe, and most of the flour, and then let it sit over night. In the morning, add your eggs and rest of the flour and you're good to go!

I like to bake often so I add 1-2 cups of flour and water at a time to my mother. It sours rapidly and lets me make 2-4 batches a week!

Carrie M

www.totallykadeshfarm.blogspot.com

Farmgirl Sisterhood #147

Tis better to weep at joy than to joy at weeping--Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 27 2009 1:04:54 PM
Message:

I made these GREAT waffles today! I forgot to take a picture but I plan on making them again next week so I will take a picture then. You have to plan the night before for these but if you have a waffle iron I highly suggest this recipe.

Sourdough Waffles

2 Cups all-purpose organic flour (King Arthur is great)
2 Tbs. Sugar
2 Cups Buttermilk (regular milk works too - just a little different flavor)
1 Cup starter
2 large eggs
1/4 cup melted butter
1 tsp. vanilla
3/4 tsp. salt
1 tsp. baking soda

The night before, stir your starter and remove one cup. (You can feed your starter after you remove the one cup) To the one cup of starter add the flour, buttermilk and sugar. Stir and cover and let sit at room temperature over night or at least 14 hours. In the morning mix the eggs, butter and vanilla in a small bowl. Add to the starter mixture. Stir in the salt and baking soda. Cook your waffles according to the directions in your waffle maker.

In the past I have substituted the vanilla with orange or almond extract for a little different flavor. The orange waffles with a sprinkle of fresh orange zest and some mini chocolate chips on top are delicious!!!

NOTE: I have halved this recipe and it works just fine!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: MaryJane
Replied on: Jan 27 2009 3:03:54 PM
Message:

I snapped some quick photos of some of my bread baking this week in an attempt to help you with some of your questions. Here’s a double batch of Farmhouse White in the making. I wanted you to see the texture and weight of it. I stirred this just until it became a mass. It still needs a few quick turns before I plop it into my buttered cast iron saucepan. (For a refresher course, click on the link in the first post on this thread and read all seven pages, found also in the Simply Bee issue [Feb/March] of my magazine.)



Here it is plopped into my 3-quart cast iron saucepan (that’s why it’s a double batch--a 3-qt. is too big for a single batch). This saucepan is a Universal brand and does have a lid that I use while the bread is rising all day. I keep the lid placed off-center just a tad so the loaf gets a bit of air. Because this pan is new and still getting a nice dark cure, I cut one round of parchment paper for the bottom, just in case. And because I was in a fussy mood, I placed the bottom of the pan down onto the parchment, drew around it with a pencil, then cut it out and put the circle of parchment in the bottom of the pan. I knew I didn’t need parchment up the sides because I’ve been working on this new pan for a couple of weeks. Here’s where you can buy a NEW 2-qt. cast iron saucepan:
www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_k?url=search-alias%3Dgarden&field-keywords=cast+iron+saucepan



Okay, the double batch was consumed before I had time to take any photos. So last night before I went to bed, around 10 pm, I put a single-batch together in my 2-quart saucepan. I set it on my counter to rise through the night. I checked the temperature where I keep my mother and where I raise my breads--70.4 F to be exact.

The next morning, bright and early (I keep farmgirl hours so it was 5 am) I preheated my oven and put some water in a pan on the bottom shelf. Here’s a pic of the bread before it goes into the oven to be baked WITHOUT A LID.



Here’s a bottom shot after baking and a top shot. I had it in the oven for 20 minutes before I checked the internal temperature with my thermometer. Even though it was 195 F after 20 minutes, I left it in another 5 minutes to make the crust more crispy. (I love a chewy, crisp crust and white bread takes a bit longer to get nicely browned and crisp.)



Here are a couple of my thermometers. Please note the price on my new one, $7.49--a wise but cheap investment.



Here’s a “still warm” slice about to be eaten! Please note the texture. It’s moist but not doughy at all. If you’re going to eat your bread warm, use a serrated bread knife to cut it.



Here’s a shot of my mother after sitting since yesterday morning’s additions of purified (distilled for me) water and white flour. Please note all the bubbles but also note that she’s starting to slow down. Throughout the night she was even more bubbly and the bubbles were bigger. I can tell by the small size of her bubbles now that she’s starting to use up all her food.



Okay, now I have a treat for my husband and two sons who work here. This morning I’ll butter some slices, then drizzle honey and cinnamon on each slice--perfect for their morning coffee/tea break.

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~


P.S. I’m going to offer members of my sisterhood a one-time Valentine’s Day special that includes some of our organic bread flour that we use in things like our budget mix. We can’t go into the business of selling “just” flour on a regular basis (our plates are mighty full) but I do want you to experience organic flour that I know performs perfectly for making “Bread the MaryJane Way.” So sistahs, stay tuned for that offer via email sometime next week. If you aren’t a member yet, here’s a link that explains who we are and why we’re the proud members of an official sisterhood.

www.maryjanesfarm.org/farmgirl-sisterhood/

P.P.S. Today’s lunch! (You’re in for a treat if you’ve never tried orange-juice sweetened cranberries on a sandwich.) Sourdough bread holds together tight when you slice it thin for sandwiches. It doesn't fall apart and because it isn't "cakey" it doesn't get soggy like most breads do when you make your lunch in the morning. It has a nice chewy texture and makes, I think, the BEST sandwich bread. And when you're eating a nice, big fat sandwich full of chicken, cheese slices, lettuce, mustard, and mayo, the slices hold the whole thing together without cracking apart.

P.P.P.S. One more thing! In my experience, true sourdough bread that is kneaded (my method doesn't requiring any kneading) often ends up with largish holes in it but my no-knead bread never ever creates big holes in the slices. I think the holes are thought of as an artisan trademark thing. The bread still tastes mighty fine but the holes sure can leak honey, mayo, etc. all over the place.




Reply author: whimseyc
Replied on: Jan 27 2009 3:57:22 PM
Message:


Jill - above is an explination about the liquid on top.
Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com

Thanks a bunch for the explanation - it makes me feel much better. Although I dumped the starter because I thought it had gone bad LOL, I'll start another one this weekend and try again. Again, thanks much!

Sometimes you just have to take the leap, and build your wings on the way down.


Reply author: kristin sherrill
Replied on: Jan 27 2009 4:52:18 PM
Message:

OK, I have a maybe dumb question. I've noticed a lot of the first bread that is baked mostly is not good or didn't rise or was too gooey in the middle or something. So, the organic flour I bought was nearly $9.00. Quite expensive to be wasting. So for my very first batch do ya'll think I could use just plain ole all-purpose flour just in case mine doesn't turn out? I just hate to waste the good flour. But then am I maybe anticipating that mine will not turn out good? Oh, what a dilema! I just got to thinking about this and thought I'd ask anyway.

My mother looks good so far. Nice and bubbly. No smell yet, though.

Kris

Turn your face to the sun and the shadows fall behind you. Maori proverb


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 27 2009 4:58:18 PM
Message:

Kris I would say you should stick with organic all the way. If you are concerned about the first week results go with pancakes or waffles instead and wait to make bread the second week.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: K-Falls Farmgirl
Replied on: Jan 27 2009 5:55:24 PM
Message:

Here are my two small loaves of bread I just took from the oven..
..

They were the size of grapefruits when I put them in two 6 inch cast iron skillets to rise...this morning. They have a nice hard crust..baked them to 200 degrees inside.. We shall see how they taste at dinner.
Cheryl
Farmgirl #309


Almost daily posts at:
http://www.k-fallsfarmgirl.blogspot.com/
Come visit the barn at http://barndoorcreations.blogspot.com/

"If you don't like something, change it. If you can't change it, change your attitude." Maya Angelou


Reply author: Quintessential Kate
Replied on: Jan 27 2009 6:31:27 PM
Message:

They are beautiful Cheryl...
And I can tell you now that they are going to taste wonderful.

Ciao, Kate

Heart of Texas
Chapter
AKA: Hot Farmgirl #234
http://quintessentialkate.blogspot.com

Today is my best day!


Reply author: Julia
Replied on: Jan 27 2009 6:33:49 PM
Message:

Yum Cheryl! They look great and I am sure are gone by now! I read the article yesterday and got really excited, one by the simplicity of it, but be cause I have so often had to dump my starter because it would turn black and smell weird. Now I know why! I will be starting a MJ starter tonight. Can't wait!

For tomorrow and its needs I do not pray, but keep me, guide me, love me, Lord just for today.
St. Augustine

#440


Reply author: kristin sherrill
Replied on: Jan 27 2009 6:39:48 PM
Message:

Thanks Julie. I guess I'm just thinking ahead too much.

And Cheryl, your bread is so shiny. Or is it just the light ? They look good.

Kris

Turn your face to the sun and the shadows fall behind you. Maori proverb


Reply author: K-Falls Farmgirl
Replied on: Jan 27 2009 7:51:46 PM
Message:

Oh Mary Jane Thank You!!! YUMMY.. It tastes So good.. I could really taste the sourdough ..I did slap on some "butter" on top when it came out of the oven,
Kris, That is why it is so shiny. As it cooled it looked more cracked & rustic. The butter made the crust a bit more pliable I think.. We ate only one loaf...but I bet it is gone tomorrow.. Dh asked me if I could make some more by the weekend to take to his brothers house with us..( he didn't pay much attention did he to what I was doing every morning adding to the "Mother".) I guess I will make more next week..double the recipe... Now that I know better of what to do..

Cheryl
Farmgirl #309


Almost daily posts at:
http://www.k-fallsfarmgirl.blogspot.com/
Come visit the barn at http://barndoorcreations.blogspot.com/

"If you don't like something, change it. If you can't change it, change your attitude." Maya Angelou


Reply author: gardenmaam
Replied on: Jan 28 2009 09:08:10 AM
Message:

Good Morning everyone ! - I mixed up my first batch of starter Monday and have kept a dry thin towell on it. This morning I noticed a thick crust on part of the top of the batter. I mixed it in then remembered NOT to do that. OOPS
I live in Southern California and air is dry now. My kitchen does get warm too. I do keep it covered. I am wondering how to prevent this thickening? Or is it OK to remove the thick part when it occurs? Anyone having same issue


Reply author: MaryJane
Replied on: Jan 28 2009 09:19:17 AM
Message:

Hi Cathy,
You can do either one. I've had luck mixing it back in and it seems to just dissolve. Or you can take a wooden spoon and remove it. If you are at home all day, keep your towel wet with purified water and that won't happen. Right now, your starter needs to be capturing airborne yeasts so you can't use my wet towel/plate trick just yet.


MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~


Reply author: gardenmaam
Replied on: Jan 28 2009 09:39:18 AM
Message:

Hi Mary Jane~
Thank you for the responding to my question. So quick too!! Now I can rest easy and let it bee!
And thanks to Pam and to Julie for responding to my question earlier in the week about the towell (wet or dry). Appreciated your help.
I will try the sourdough waffles too when my starter is ready for it. I am really enjoying reading everyones posts. Thanks again!


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 28 2009 09:47:06 AM
Message:

Yummy! I baked my second round of bread today! I let it rise over night in my office where I have a space heater going to keep my plants from freezing. I used my bread pans, one of which is clear/purple glass so I looked underneath and saw lots of promising looking bubbles right before I put them in the oven! They cooked beautifully! Nice golden crust all around and beautiful centers! Firm, stable and delicious just like MaryJane said it would be! Nora and I both had a slice when it was fresh out of the oven with just a smear of butter. It was so good!

While my first baking did have some rise to it, this one had a lot more. Keep at it ladies! You will be richly rewarded!

Oh and I let my bread develop a bit of a crust as it rose, so I put a little butter on it while it baked and a tiny bit more when it came out of the oven. The crust was thin and so yummy!

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 28 2009 10:49:45 AM
Message:

Hey guys. My power is out and I was able to get up to the school and get on the computer for just a few minutes. They are saying it may be Friday before we have electricity again! Anyway - I will probably not be around to answer questions until the weekend. Hopefully sooner! I will try to answer them ASAP.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: maerwert
Replied on: Jan 28 2009 11:11:04 AM
Message:

Hello everyone,
I started my Mother last week and am trying Ronna's recipe this first time around, although I did remove a half cup for a quick batch of pancakes. The pancakes were great.
I have had good luck with Bob's Red Mill unbleached flour and my well water, which I leave out overnight to come to room temperature. If any of you have a store that sells in bulk you can often find organic products very reasonably priced. Here we have Bob's RM products at both Fred Meyer and Winco Foods.

berrypatchmom


Reply author: Suzan
Replied on: Jan 28 2009 12:40:24 PM
Message:

OH NO! I started my mother on Monday this week and just found out I have to go away this weekend, Sat is the only day I won't be able to feed and stir - how will this affect it?


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 28 2009 12:41:43 PM
Message:

Welcome to the forum, Mary! MM I bet you pancakes were wonderful! I need to try that next!

I am using Red Mill brand as well since that was what my organic store carries. I am so glad that Winco has it, though when we lived near a Winco I think I do remember seeing that brand now that I think about it.

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: Meadowflower
Replied on: Jan 28 2009 5:20:37 PM
Message:

I'm looking forward to trying this bread. I've read through the article twice (and also saved the internet article to my Evernote notes!)

I used to buy this particular very basic whole wheat sour dough bread with raisins. It was my diet staple! LOL So wonderful. Then the breadmaker went out of business. I was heartbroken. I've always wanted to make my own sourdough but never knew how and breadmaking always seemed difficult. So I'll be learning this, then will try it with whole grains (with raisins!) when I get confident in breadmaking with the white flour.

*~Lisa~*

My farmish blog: http://meadowflowerfarm.blogspot.com/


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 28 2009 6:21:24 PM
Message:

Suzanne- your starter should be fine. You can put it in a cool place to slow down the yeast metabolism if you are concerned.

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 28 2009 6:22:45 PM
Message:

Nora's dinner tonight consisted of, in part, a couple of slices of homemade sour dough bread with peanut butter and honey! She loved it! It is the first meal in a long time where she has really dug in with gusto! I think we will have to start trying that for a snack more often!

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: Quintessential Kate
Replied on: Jan 29 2009 05:41:38 AM
Message:

Alee,
Do you make your own peanutbutter?? Just curious. Night before last we had BLT's....made with sourdough and they were yummy. Last night we went out for dinner to celebrate my #55 birthday. This morning I woke up closer to 60 than 50. Kinda hard to wrap my head around that....but I firmly believe you're as young as you feel. So that being said.....this week alone I have been in the range from 30 to about 80 ( when the cold hit and all the joints were aching....and I was actually walking around with a shawl on to keep my shoulders warm. All in all.........it's been a GREAT trip and I look forward to several more decades.

Ciao, Kate

Heart of Texas
Chapter
AKA: Hot Farmgirl #234
http://quintessentialkate.blogspot.com

Today is my best day!


Reply author: sunflowercritters
Replied on: Jan 29 2009 06:10:25 AM
Message:

Just was wondering how heavy the sourdough should be. I tried it last week and it was very heavy and hard to cut. My husband tried it and said this bread grows on you. He really like the taste of it. And I like the idea making its own yeast.But just wanted to try to make it lighter. Can someone help me out on this.

Farmgirl Sister #462

Worry ends Where Faith in God begins.


Reply author: kristin sherrill
Replied on: Jan 29 2009 07:29:57 AM
Message:

I love real peanut butter. I get it at the market. Just plain ole peanuts. But be careful now because of the salmanella outbreak in peanuts now. 8 people have died so far from the peanuts that came from a factory here in Ga. And it's in any peanut product, too, like crackers or any snack food with PB in it. My husband had gotten some Smuckers all natural PB and had a sandwich while he was out on the road in his truck and he was awfully sick right after. He thinks that's what made him sick.

They did say all Jiff is ok. So ya'll be careful. It especially affects younger children. Sorry to get off the subject of the sour dough, but thought I'd bring this up since it kind of does go together. And happy birthday, Kate!

Kris

Turn your face to the sun and the shadows fall behind you. Maori proverb


Reply author: TheresaB
Replied on: Jan 29 2009 07:57:36 AM
Message:

Baked my second batch of Farmhouse White this morning after letting the single batch rise over night in the oven with a moist dishcloth cover. I decided to try my pyrex bread pan. I knew I needed to "fuss a bit" as last week's batch stuck to everything but the dog. I'm not really much of a fusser, but I have a very precocious four year old fusser on staff. I made a template of the pan interior and let her go to town tracing and cutting out parchment paper pan liners! Her tongue poked out the corner of her mouth in the sheer delight of concentrated bliss (this bought me enough time to help a grumbling nine year old write a paragraph on the habitat of the platypus). The bread turned out PERFECT! Crunchy on the outside, chewy on the inside, slightly dense and quite sour. Needless to say it's half gone already. I did knead it about 10 or 12 times before letting it rise. I couldn't be more pleased!

Thank you, thank you, thank you!

Theresa in Colorado
Proud Farmgirl Sister #124
www.thegypsysdaughter.etsy.com
www.thegypsysdaughter.blogspot.com

"I see skies of blue, clouds of white, the bright blessed day, the dark sacred night, and I think to myself, "What a Wonderful World!" ~ Louis Armstrong


Reply author: 5 acre Farmgirl
Replied on: Jan 29 2009 10:36:48 AM
Message:

I did IT!!!! It does not rise very much(or did I goof?),,,but, tasted like a real sourdough...am trying another batch a I type....
YUM!!!!

Farmgirl Sister #368

http://froccsfrillsfurbiloesandmore.blogspot.com
http://thecontentedwoman.blogspot.com


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 29 2009 10:48:09 AM
Message:

Hi Debra-

Real sourdough, and by that I mean the homemade stuff. Slight segue here- Did you know some store bought bread uses commercial yeasts and then "added flavoring" to give it the sour taste? Not real sourdough at all!

Anyway, the real sourdough will be denser than most commercially bought bread. It will have body and texture to it and be strong enough to handle a goodly amount of sandwich fillings without falling apart.

If your dough is coming out dense try letting it rise for a longer time. Sourdough needs a long slow rise. my first batch was nice but denser than I prefer so my second batch I let rise overnight in a warm environment and is perfect!

Since it is winter, most of us keep our houses a bit colder than in the summer. So you will see a bit of a difference in bread that is left to rise for 8 hours in winter as opposed to bread that is left to rise for 8 hours in summer.

If you are really struggling with density problems, I suggest trying a glass bread pan. That really set my mind at ease because I could look in and see the size of the bubbles that were forming in the bread. Once it was bubbly enough for my taste in bread it got put into the oven.

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: Julia
Replied on: Jan 29 2009 4:34:08 PM
Message:

I started my started on Tuesday, it is starting to smell oh so yummy! I can't wait!

For tomorrow and its needs I do not pray, but keep me, guide me, love me, Lord just for today.
St. Augustine

#440


Reply author: Cindy Lee
Replied on: Jan 29 2009 7:51:48 PM
Message:

OK, I will add my two cents....I have been making the garlic/olive loaf and it's a "keeper" for sure. But, I did add some chopped green olives (with the black) and some sun dried tomatoes as well......YUM!


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 29 2009 9:15:24 PM
Message:

My starter has hit a new level of growth! It' awesome! There is so much action in the starter (bubbles). I am so pleased! I can't wait to try a new baking of bread!

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: kristin sherrill
Replied on: Jan 30 2009 08:29:19 AM
Message:

Ok, someone mentioned they just started theirs on Tues. and it already smells so good. I went and stuck my face down in mine and I don't smell the sour smell,just flour. And I did mine on Sun. It's all nice and bubbly, but no smell. Also the first few days it was real elasticky and now its more not. I also did a lot of baking yesterday and it's sitting on the oven part of the stove. It got real warm.

I hope it's ok. Or should I start over? Kris

Turn your face to the sun and the shadows fall behind you. Maori proverb


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 30 2009 09:44:59 AM
Message:

Kristin- does it have bubbles in it, especially half and hour to an hour after you feed it? Also each starter will smell a bit different depending on the different types of yeasts and which bacteria strain it is working with.

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: janiee
Replied on: Jan 30 2009 10:44:23 AM
Message:

Ok, I have a question now that we are on our second week...we went with the larger quantities so that we could bake twice a week. When we take out the 2 cups for the first batch on saturday...since it's moms day off, we don't add anything back in, right? then on wednesday when we take out the cups again, do we add back in only the 2/3 cups flour and 1/2 cup water or do we need to add more? the article says it is simple math but my math is a little rusty for this type of cooking
janiee
farmgirl #390


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 30 2009 11:02:01 AM
Message:

Hi Janie! You got it right the first time! Don't feed on Saturday, but feed on Wednesday after you have taken out the starter to bake with for that day! I highlighted the following paragraph with some colors that I hope help highlight the sentences that will help you.

http://www.maryjanesfarm.org/Recipes-Patterns-Instructions/no-knead_bread-3.asp
What if I want to make bread three times a week or make bigger loaves? Just make sure you give back to your mother the same amount you take out. Simple math. For example, let’s say you want to bake bread every Wednesday AND Saturday. Start with a larger mother, using 4 cups of flour and 3 cups water, then add 2/3 cup flour and ½ cup water each day except for Saturday, always mother’s day of rest. On Wednesday of the second week, take the 2 cups you’ll use for baking that day out of the mother before you add the flour and water for that day. When I’m feeding lots of people, it’s just simple math again, but I start out using a fabulous antique ceramic bowl that holds eight gallons—now that’s a lot of satisfied farmhands!

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: Carrie M
Replied on: Jan 30 2009 11:03:16 AM
Message:

My starter is now a few weeks old and I am noticing a big difference in it's rising ability. I used mostly wheat flour because I like the whole grain bread, so I need to knead my dough when I'm making bread, but the rises are getting better and better. I like to knead so don't mind the extra work and my no knead loaf failed so I'm hesitant to keep doing that. The kids keep commenting on how much they like my bread--rolls, actually, because I make a double batch, divide it up into 10 small "loaves" and bake them that way. It makes a great little mini loaf/roll that works as bread to eat with spagetti (sprinkled with granulated garlic before baking) or for a sandwich (sliced in half and loaded with goodies).

I don't find that kneading has created large bubbles, in fact my bread is of a finer texture than the photos in this link. It's just a heavier loaf than you would get at the store. It is very hearty and yummy.

I do want to try to achieve a "no knead" bread, so I have been using only white flour in my mother and will do a cast iron loaf soon. I don't find KA organic flour near me so I'm using KA unbleached bread flour and it smells and looks great!! I will try to get organic flour the next time I visit our food Co-Op.

Oh yeah, I made pizza dough and it came out wonderfully! I took three cups of mother and added a couple cups of white flour. I mixed it up a bit then let is sit from morning to just before dinnertime. Then I added salt, italian seasoning, and enough flour to make a spreadable dough. This made a round and a rectangular pizza on my two stones. I covered them with sauce and let then rise in my warm kitchen for another 1/2 hour. Then we topped with cheese and baked. Soooo Good!

Grateful for this link...I'm finding little tidbits that are helping me put this whole sourdough thing together. There is so much to learn and I'm finding that it really is very forgiving and not as finicky as I once thought. That is good because I've never been one to follow rules very well. I like flexible projects!!!

Blessing on you all, fellow bakers!

Carrie

www.totallykadeshfarm.blogspot.com

Farmgirl Sisterhood #147

Tis better to weep at joy than to joy at weeping--Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 30 2009 11:08:29 AM
Message:

So basically you are taking the times you want to bake per week and times in the base feeding amounts.

So the base feeding amount is 1/3 cup flour, 1/4 cup water. So say you want to bake 1 times a week. Everyday but Saturday when Mother doesn't get fed- you will feed

Base amounts x baking amounts = feeding amount

so if you are only baking once per week the equation looks like this:

(1/3 flour x 1 baking) + (1/4 flour x 1 baking)= feeding 1/3 cup flour and 1/4 cup water

If you wanted to bake 5 times a week the equation on how much to feed every day but Saturday would look like this:

(1/3 flour x 5) + (1/4 water times 5)= 1 2/3 cups flour plus 1 1/4 cup water.

If any of this confuses anyone, I would be more than happy to do the math for you. Just let me know how many times you want to bake each week. And remember, if you are changing how much you want to make, you need to give your starter a week to build up the volume.

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: janiee
Replied on: Jan 30 2009 11:43:15 AM
Message:

thank you Alee! my husband and i both were having a bit of confusion with that....we are going to try to olive bread tomorrow....just can't eat regular "bread" anymore..
janiee
farmgirl #390


Reply author: kristin sherrill
Replied on: Jan 30 2009 12:06:46 PM
Message:

Alee yes, mine is bubbly right after. I just smelled it again and there is a slight sour smell.

Thanks. This is so interesting.

Kris

Turn your face to the sun and the shadows fall behind you. Maori proverb


Reply author: pearlgirl
Replied on: Jan 30 2009 12:51:52 PM
Message:

Ok, for some reason my post didn't show up, so here I go again.

My starter was so bubbly last night that it was almost frothy. I think putting it in the warm cupboard really helped mother take off. So I took the plunge this morning and mixed up the cinnamon-raisin bread. It is rising in the same warm cupboard. What was really strange was when I took out the two cups of starter there was only like a 1/3 cup starter left in the bowl. Now, I started out with 2 cups of flour and 1 1/2 cups of water, I've added a total of 2 cups flour and 1 1/2 cups water, so is it normal for the starter to reduce that much? I went ahead and fed it it's normal feeding this morning and plan on doing two feedings a day to get the bulk back up.

I let you know how the bread comes out. I am hoping for the best, though at six hours it hasn't risen a whole lot.

Favour is deceitful, and beauty is vain: but a woman that feareth the LORD, she shall be praised. Give her of the fruit of her hands; and let her own works praise her in the gates.
Pro 31:30,31

http://pearlsgleanings.blogspot.com/
http://www.pearlgirl901.etsy.com/


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Jan 30 2009 1:27:19 PM
Message:

Lydia when counting the total amount the water is what adds up the most. Because the flour gets mixed into the water you are not really adding 2 cups to the total volume when you add 2 cups of flour.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: AuntPammy
Replied on: Jan 31 2009 04:52:49 AM
Message:

Oh my goodness!!!I made my bread yesterday and it was delish.I didn't even get to post pics because it was gobbled up in very little time! I am going to double the recipe for next week and hopfully have pictures to show you gals. I made one basic and the other I made a cinnamon bread with cinnamon icing.

"Keep your face to the sunshine and you will never see the shadow." Helen Keller

www.auntpsalmostheaven.blogspot.com


Reply author: Quintessential Kate
Replied on: Jan 31 2009 05:56:55 AM
Message:

As I mentioned earlier in the thread, I keep my house on the "cool" side. This is my second whole week with my starter, and it is doing beautifully. Bubbles, bubbles everywhere...and a very pleasant sour aroma. The first week I made the San Francisco Sour Dough w/yeast...and it was fantastic...as the pictures I posted indicated. Yesterday I made my no knead....let it rise overnight....and actually all the next morning and had it piping hot when DH got home from work. It was beautiful....but unfortunately no pics this time, as it was devoured by my hubby, his cousin and his wife and me....and my 3 year old niece.
This weeks lesson I have gleaned is P-A-T-I-E-N-C-E!!!!!!!
Have a great weekend...........AND.............GO CARDINALS!!!! I am a former Zonie and am rooting for the Birds.
Ciao, Kate

Heart of Texas
Chapter
AKA: Hot Farmgirl #234
http://quintessentialkate.blogspot.com

Today is my best day!


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 31 2009 06:22:55 AM
Message:

That is awesome Kate!

My starter is doing amazing too! I fed her yesterday morning and she bubbled like crazy all day and rose so much I had to stir her down, and she is still at it this morning! I am going to have to stir her down again!

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: olive610
Replied on: Jan 31 2009 06:33:41 AM
Message:

Good Morning Everybody,

I am a Newbie here and this is my first post. My first attempt with the starter failed. I was using my filtered water and apparently it killed Mother. We have chlorinated water here and I don't think the filter did the trick in removing all the chlorine.

So I ran, well I actually drove:), to Whole Food Market and bought some new flour and distilled water. I am happy to report that Mother is loving her feedings and doing well. Today is baking day so I am really excited about how things will turn out. As soon as I finish my morning cup of coffee I am going to decide which recipe to make and get started.

I will let you know how this all turns out.


Reply author: pearlgirl
Replied on: Jan 31 2009 07:32:01 AM
Message:



Here is my Cinnamon-Raisin bread! It was pretty dense but that is probably because it is only the first week. It tasted really good and wasn't very sour at all. I would actually like it to be more sour, so next week I'll try the Farmhouse bread. BTW, it took more like 45 minutes for that loaf. I just kept checking it until it was done in the center, though it only got to about 180F.

Favour is deceitful, and beauty is vain: but a woman that feareth the LORD, she shall be praised. Give her of the fruit of her hands; and let her own works praise her in the gates.
Pro 31:30,31

http://pearlsgleanings.blogspot.com/
http://www.pearlgirl901.etsy.com/


Reply author: chessie
Replied on: Jan 31 2009 07:37:50 AM
Message:

welcome Mary-Alice!
Happy Baking day to you (and everyone). Today I'm making sourdough pancakes and biscuits from the Lifebook. This whole sourdough exercise is so much fun and tasty too.
can't wait to see and hear how it goes,
Karen

www.edgehillherbfarm.com "where the name is bigger than the farm, but no one seems to mind"
blog http://edgehillherbfarmer.spaces.live.com/default.aspx?wa=wsignin1.0
happy farmgirl #89


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 31 2009 07:41:29 AM
Message:

Welcome to the forum, Olive! I hope your baking goes well! How old is your starter now?

I just followed MaryJane's Farmhouse White recipe, but I did cheat a little bit. I used my Kitchen-Aid to mix the dough for me! It only took about a minute to put it all together, mix it up and put it in my baking dish! I am very excited. She is rising on top of the fridge today. I will check on her at 6 hours, but if not she can wait the whole 8 hour rise :D I definitely need to get some raisins in the house so I can do the cinnamon raisin recipe. I bet Nora will LOVE that one!

Here is was Ma Stonefeld (our starter named by my husband) looks like after I took today's baking out. Oh and she is starting to smell beery! Yesterday she just smelled more sour than beery- but today the beery smell that MaryJane talked about is starting to mature!



This is what she looked like last week so you can see the difference that maturity is bringing:


Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: olive610
Replied on: Jan 31 2009 08:10:26 AM
Message:

Thank you Chessie and Alee. It's really nice to be here with all of you. I have read so many of the different topics and there is really a very nice group of women here. It's a very nice place to come and spend a part of my day.

Alee, to answer your question about how old my starter is, I started it last Sunday so she is very young. I made the basic Farmhouse White recipe. I really wanted to make the Cinnamon Raisin but discovered I was out of the wheat flour.

My bread is all mixed up and rising in its new little cast iron home. I had a really difficult time finding a pot to bake it in. I never did find the good old fashioned kind. I had to settle on a Cuisanart enameled one. I hope it works okay. I will be in tears if it doesn't.

I was so inspired by all of this I hauled out my Breadman machine. I had lost the instruction manual for it but managed to pull up directions on the Internet. Modern technology is just great. I made an egg bread in it and we enjoyed that toasted for our breakfast this morning. I don't think I had used that machine in 5 years and was delighted to find out it still worked.

Well, I'd better get myself in gear and get on with my laundry. I think it breeds in the laundry hamper. There is a never-ending pile. I don't know how two people can generate so much in a just a few days.

Have a great baking day everyone.


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 31 2009 08:48:53 AM
Message:

I know what you mean!

Because your starter is very young, don't be surprised if this week's bread is a little denser (still wonderful though!)

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: olive610
Replied on: Jan 31 2009 08:53:36 AM
Message:

Thanks Alee. I just checked my rise and it is just sitting there doing nothing. It is rather chilly here today so I put it in the oven to keep any drafts off it. Keeping my fingers crossed.

"Life is a great big canvas, and you should throw all the paint on it you can." Danny Kaye


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 31 2009 10:10:03 AM
Message:

My first rise was like that. It did rise but it took a long time and was not a great rise, but already this week I can tell a huge difference!

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: kristin sherrill
Replied on: Jan 31 2009 12:05:19 PM
Message:

I made my first bread this morning. It's on the mantle over the fireplace. It's the warmest spot in the house right now. OMG! I just went to look at it and it's in a small cast iron skillet with a corning ware bowl over the top and the bowl won't come off!! Now I,m afraid to take it off. It might fall. Oh, what have I done? It is so big now. HELP!!!
I went ahead and got it off. I guess I won't do that again. Wow. It got big fast. It's been rising since 9 this morning there. So I guess I'll let it go a little more. Darn, it was so pretty. Now it's jagged aroung the edges. It'll make it look more rustic, I guess.
Kris

Turn your face to the sun and the shadows fall behind you. Maori proverb


Reply author: sunflowercritters
Replied on: Jan 31 2009 1:47:55 PM
Message:

Thank you all for helping me with the bread starter. Thanks for The pictures they are great for me and I'm so excited being part of this family. Looking forward to see how my bread will come out next week. I'm letting the starter age for another week before trying it the second time.

Worry ends Where Faith in God begins.


Reply author: roselake
Replied on: Jan 31 2009 2:46:59 PM
Message:

I started my mother yesterday with organic flour and purified water. Then today when i added to her i forgot and used tap water instead of the pure water. How soon will i know if it's ruined? Plus, my starter looked really think compared to the pics i see that you guys post. Does it thin down as it ages?

I'm new here and i love reading thru all the posts. :) You guys already sound like some of my dearest friends.


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 31 2009 3:20:01 PM
Message:

Kristin- I bet it will taste fabulous!

Debra- I bet you can hardly wait for another week to go by! I find feeding the starter ever day feeds my addiction to sourdough!

Anne- Welcome to the forum! I would go ahead and keep feeding you mother every day. And switch back to the purified water. She should recover!

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: olive610
Replied on: Jan 31 2009 3:59:05 PM
Message:

Update on my first loaf of bread:

I did not get a very good rise. It just kind of sat there in the pan all day and rose just a smidge. I understand this was a very young starter.....only a week old and others have had this happen too.

I waited 8 hours and then I baked it. It is very dense and looks a lot like some of the pictures that some members have posted. It was flat and about 2 inches high at the most. Hubby and I dove right into it and had slices with butter and pumpkin butter. It tasted great. I hope next time I will get more of a rise. I am not giving up.

roselake, Mine was never too thick except maybe the first 2 days and then it tended to thin a out little. However it still stayed bubbly and did get a little separation of the liquid on top. That is normal. Good luck.

"Life is a great big canvas, and you should throw all the paint on it you can." Danny Kaye


Reply author: kristin sherrill
Replied on: Jan 31 2009 4:52:22 PM
Message:

I am going to have to see if my DD can post pics on her computer tomorrow. I let the dough rise on the mantle over the fireplace. It rose beautifully. And fast. Faster than I expected. Way over the top of the cast iron skillet. Anyway, I put it in the oven with the muffin tin of water. Note to self: move tin to the back of the oven, not right UNDER the bread. Because more than half way thru, I checked the temp and kind of picked it up a little out of the pan and it was not done on the bottom middle. And I had to put tin foil over the top also b/c the top was getting so browned. Anyway, it turned out so good! Came right out of the skillet. I took pics of everything.

Now the only problem is the whole middle is one huge bubble! After I cut it I could pick it up and squeeze the sides and it smiles! Big ole crater in the middle. But it's not heavy at all, either. Just so good.

I must admit I did knead it in my grandmothers old wooden bread bowl. Just had to do it. Did that maybe cause the big bubble? I did pat it down really good, though. Maybe it's because I had the tin of water right under it.

Sorry this is so long, but it's been a very nerve wracking day for me. Was anyone else on pins and needles over their first bread baking venture? I'm just glad it's over for now!

Kris

Turn your face to the sun and the shadows fall behind you. Maori proverb


Reply author: Buffalomary
Replied on: Jan 31 2009 5:49:04 PM
Message:

Today I used some whole wheat flour I had on hand and added some cinnamon and raisins. The whole house smelled sooo good. In fact, I couldn't wait for the loaf to cool off. I had to cut a piece off and devoured it as soon as I took it out of the oven. It is only getting better! I posted a pic at my blog site today. I added enough extra this past week that tomorrow I'm also going to try some pancakes again. Yummmmy!

Buffalomary
Farmgirl Sister #293

You can take the farmer's daughter off the farm but you can't take the farm out of the farmer's daughter!!

Please visit me at my blog: http://buffalomaryscorner.blogspot.com


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Jan 31 2009 6:05:11 PM
Message:

Kristin- you and I had the same problem. I put the tin of water right below my bread on a rack instead of on the very bottom of the stove and it cooled the area just below enough to not really cook the bottom as quickly. The top got a bit browned waiting for the bottom to develop some color.

Here are some pictures. The inside is more bubbly than I can show right now...I just had to cut it when fresh out of the oven so it smooshed a bit. Also sorry the color on the second pic is a bit off. I had to turn off the flash to get a good picture and that dimmed the whole scene a bit.

Here is my loaf with a section already cut off. We just couldn't wait! LOL


And here is a picture of the cut end:


Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: khartquilt
Replied on: Jan 31 2009 7:26:17 PM
Message:

I just started mine this morning. It is sitting on my breakfast nook. It is not a real warm place. Will that be a problem? Also, I did not like the way the towel left open gaps so I made a band with some 1 inch pant elastic to keep the towel on the bowl. Will that be ok?

Kathy H
Farmgirl Sister #81
"To the world you may be one person, but to one person you may be the world..." (anomymous)
http://khartquilt.blogspot.com


Reply author: roselake
Replied on: Jan 31 2009 9:07:59 PM
Message:

Thanks Alee and Mary-Alice. I'm setting the purified water next to mother so i don't forget again. lol If my bubble action is low at the end of the 1st week i'm thinking about adding a little yeast to the first loaf i make. I've read thru all the posts and it seems it takes most people a good two weeks to get a good growth of the good stuff. I'll decide when i get closer to it, but i thought i'd rather add a little yeast than feed the dog with the first loaf. lol ;)

I am so in love with this site. My friend ordered me the magazine and i can't wait until it comes. You guys are awesome!


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Feb 01 2009 12:13:01 AM
Message:

Hi Kathy!

Warm is great as long as it doesn't go over 97 ish Fahrenheit (that is as hot as yeast can stand it before they start perishing). As long as the fabric covering the starter has some breathing ability, your should be fine. When you stir your starter ever morning it might be a good idea to waft the air towards your starter. That will give more air passage than normal and a greater chance of catching some native yeasts and bacteria! If after a few days you aren't seeing any bubbles you might want to re-address you covering, but I really think it will be fine.

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: khartquilt
Replied on: Feb 01 2009 04:58:32 AM
Message:

Alee, I think the fabric will breathe fine. It’s a thin cotton dish towel. The bacteria are a little creepy to me. I know its good but it makes me think of mold. Will I get sick from it?
This is a very new adventure for me. My bread always came from the supermarket. I never thought twice about it. My idea of home baked bread was that frozen loaf from the freezer.

Day two: Just added the 1/3 of flour and the 1/4 of water. Everything looks ok. It was kind of gluey. And I had a little dryness at the edges.


Kathy H
Farmgirl Sister #81
"To the world you may be one person, but to one person you may be the world..." (anomymous)
http://khartquilt.blogspot.com


Reply author: Quintessential Kate
Replied on: Feb 01 2009 05:14:05 AM
Message:

Hi Mary Alice...
Welcome to the friendliest place on Earth! I'm Kate......living in Tyler, TX.
You're going to love it here!!! Where is Missouri City?
I'm sure I'll be seeing you here around the farm.
Welcome again!
Kate

Heart of Texas
Chapter
AKA: Hot Farmgirl #234
http://quintessentialkate.blogspot.com

Today is my best day!


Reply author: Quintessential Kate
Replied on: Feb 01 2009 05:48:48 AM
Message:

Ann/Roselake,
My mother is in a cool place and when it was time for my first bake I was a bit hesitant because I didn't think she had captured enough yeast. I used Ronna's San Francisco Style Sourdough French Bread recipe. It's the last post on page 13 of this thread. It does call for yeast and kneading....but I really felt I needed the additional yeast at the time. It's a wonderful recipe. I just made my first "no knead" loaf a couple of days ago and it turned out great. I think patience is the key. This is the beginning of my 3rd week of having "Ma" around....so my no knead loaf was at the end of my second week....which coincides with the successful loaves all the girls are producing now.
Also.........Julie/Willowcreek, I made your Sourdough Pancakes yesterday morning and they were wonderful. I don't know how many times my husband mentioned how good "those pancakes" were.
We're going to "Canton, TX....First Monday Trade Days today....and I will be searching for some nice old ceramic bowls....that I can give away to friends and family. I think a start with a nice vintage dish towel and a new wooden spoon....along with the instructions and recipes would make a cute "gift".
By the way.......I've been using cheesecloth as my cover......with a 3/4" wide rubber band to keep it in place.
See all of you later.....it's off to Canton.
Ciao, Kate

Heart of Texas
Chapter
AKA: Hot Farmgirl #234
http://quintessentialkate.blogspot.com

Today is my best day!


Reply author: olive610
Replied on: Feb 01 2009 07:22:06 AM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by Quintessential Kate

Hi Mary Alice...
Welcome to the friendliest place on Earth! I'm Kate......living in Tyler, TX.
You're going to love it here!!! Where is Missouri City?
I'm sure I'll be seeing you here around the farm.
Welcome again!
Kate

Heart of Texas
Chapter
AKA: Hot Farmgirl #234
http://quintessentialkate.blogspot.com

Today is my best day!



Kate, Missouri City is just outside of Houston on the southwestern edge of the city.

I already love it here. I spent quite a bit of time yesterday reading a great deal of the many threads on here.

Thanks for the welcome and have a great day.

"Life is a great big canvas, and you should throw all the paint on it you can." Danny Kaye


Reply author: LisaTwo
Replied on: Feb 01 2009 07:40:08 AM
Message:

Ok, I did this and I don't think it turned out the way it was supposed to! Wahhh. It is so heavy. My husband thinks it is because of the weather? Could that be right? I will cut it up and either make croutons or feed it to the chickens. But I don't want to give up. Any suggestions?


Reply author: Rebekka Mae
Replied on: Feb 01 2009 09:12:26 AM
Message:

Mine looked great, this is only my first week- a nice sourdough taste and a thick crust which I love (My family will have to learn to love)!!!
I am switching from the Bob's Red Mill flour I was using to the King Arthur Breadmaking Flour- organic of course...so we will see what results next week. After that I am making double the amount so I can bake twice weekly and try a variety of recipes.

Rebekka

I love the idea of having lots of crockery bowls on-hand to send some of your mother home with friends in and I am on the lookout for a 2 qt iron saucepan now though I do love the loaves without it.

www.bebebella.etsy.com

As a woman I have no country. As a woman, my country is the whole world.

Virginia Woolf


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Feb 01 2009 10:05:32 AM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by khartquilt

Alee, I think the fabric will breathe fine. It’s a thin cotton dish towel. The bacteria are a little creepy to me. I know its good but it makes me think of mold. Will I get sick from it?
This is a very new adventure for me. My bread always came from the supermarket. I never thought twice about it. My idea of home baked bread was that frozen loaf from the freezer.

Kathy H
Farmgirl Sister #81
"To the world you may be one person, but to one person you may be the world..." (anomymous)
http://khartquilt.blogspot.com



Kathy-

No you won't get sick! In fact the unique PH balance that the symbiotic relationship between the wild yeasts and certain bacterias (namely the lactobacillus strain) create an environment that is very unhealthy for bad bacteria.

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Feb 01 2009 10:08:57 AM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by LisaTwo

Ok, I did this and I don't think it turned out the way it was supposed to! Wahhh. It is so heavy. My husband thinks it is because of the weather? Could that be right? I will cut it up and either make croutons or feed it to the chickens. But I don't want to give up. Any suggestions?



Lisa- how old was your starter? If you are on your first week or two, the starter might still be a bit young. Yeast breed pretty quickly, but it still takes time to get the population so dense that it can really do a good job in the bread dough. Try again this coming week and I bet you will see an improvement in the rise. Also length of time can affect rise as well. Real sourdough takes much longer to rise.

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: chessie
Replied on: Feb 01 2009 4:14:26 PM
Message:

ok- Hear ye, hear ye, moment -
Everybody paying attention? Good!
The sourdough biscuit recipe from MaryJane's Lifebook is to-die-for good. Perfect use for young mother/starters. I highly recommend everyone makes them the first few baking times as the starter matures. The pancakes from the lifebook were delish as well but the biscuits are beyond excellent.

www.edgehillherbfarm.com "where the name is bigger than the farm, but no one seems to mind"
blog http://edgehillherbfarmer.spaces.live.com/default.aspx?wa=wsignin1.0
happy farmgirl #89


Reply author: chessie
Replied on: Feb 01 2009 4:26:44 PM
Message:

I found the following quote from Bernard Clayton Jr's classic Complete book of Breads interesting in light of our collective sourdough adventure...
"A true starter, be forewarned, can be whimsical and maddening in the formative days. Once established, it is a joy to have in the refrigerator and, if you have like-minded aquaintances to discuss in every detail of its life."
he goes on to admit that starters using yeast as a "booster"...
"...makes it a sure thing and takes away some of the gamble -and some of the magic."

www.edgehillherbfarm.com "where the name is bigger than the farm, but no one seems to mind"
blog http://edgehillherbfarmer.spaces.live.com/default.aspx?wa=wsignin1.0
happy farmgirl #89


Reply author: Laura Marie
Replied on: Feb 01 2009 6:03:59 PM
Message:

Help please....I can't seem to find where it was about seasoning cast iron pots. I have my dutch oven, but it needs to be seasoned. I have looked through the magazine but I can't seem to remember where I had seen it posted....
Could someone please give this city farm girl a little help, just point me in the right direction and I will go from there.
Thank You!

Laura Marie #369
www.lauramariedesign.com

"It's not the size of the farm but the size of your heart!"


Reply author: Suzan
Replied on: Feb 01 2009 6:26:05 PM
Message:

Laura, Pg 15 of this thread.


Reply author: Laura Marie
Replied on: Feb 01 2009 7:36:43 PM
Message:

Thank You Suzan! It is much appericated. On a good not, I did make my 2nd loaf of sour bread. My first was a lovely paper weight but it's because I used the wrong flour. So I got the right flour started over again and bingo....I got a winner...although my neighbor and I at all but 2 sliced for breakfast today. I'm going to up my bater and make something fun next week and the farmhouse bread! I'm super excited. It's a very rewarding feeling to me...Patients is a rewarded!
Farm Girl Hugs!

Laura Marie #369
www.lauramariedesign.com

"It's not the size of the farm but the size of your heart!"


Reply author: ennoid
Replied on: Feb 01 2009 8:49:25 PM
Message:

My bread didn't turn out so well this week. I did a couple of things wrong this time around and I think I ruined my starter. My bread had a very bitter taste, almost like I added dish soap. It didn't rise very well and it took over 40 minutes to get 3/4ths of the way done. I finally gave up since the top was getting burnt. My kids, bless their hearts, still ate it as long as I slathered butter on it for them.

When I went to feed mother today, she had that same bitter smell...so I sent her to her final resting place and started over. My husband and kids are really looking forward to fresh bread each week, especially since my first time was such a success. Hopefully, I'm back on track now.


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Feb 01 2009 10:15:51 PM
Message:

That's to bad about your original starter. Hopefully things go better this week!

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: khartquilt
Replied on: Feb 02 2009 05:50:34 AM
Message:

Day two: My starter was all nice and bubbly this morning!! Happy dance!! And it even smells good!! It was a little more crusty on the edges. But for the most part they mixed in alright.

Dionne, Sorry to here about your bread.

Alee, could what we be cooking and or what we use as a cleaner in our kitchen cause our "mother" to take on different flavors/tastes? Especially those of us that are just starting and are only covering our bowl with a cloth?


Kathy H
Farmgirl Sister #81
"To the world you may be one person, but to one person you may be the world..." (anomymous)
http://khartquilt.blogspot.com


Reply author: janiee
Replied on: Feb 02 2009 06:27:10 AM
Message:

made my second batch this weekend with the mother (aka Ethel) and it turned out great! Made one loaf just plain and round shaped for me and my husband wanted small loaves for his "garlic" bread so we made three smaller loaves (he had to shape them...too cute) and they turned out really good too! He is excited about making another plain loaf for me on Wednesday ( I will be at work)...this is fun.
janiee
farmgirl #390


Reply author: maerwert
Replied on: Feb 02 2009 06:56:49 AM
Message:

Hello everyone,
I'm new at this forum and I don't know what Mary Jane's Lifebook is. Is it at a web address or is it a publication? Anyway, I would like the recipe for the sourdough bisquits please.
Thanks for all of the great info on this project.


berrypatchmom


Reply author: gardenmaam
Replied on: Feb 02 2009 07:24:24 AM
Message:

Morning everyone...I started my mother a week ago today, Monday. I was not able to use it yesterday(Sunday) to bake....nor did i let it rest yesterday like I think I was supposed to ...oops-forgot.
Today is Monday - can I use it today to make my first batch of bread??
Also, how can I get back onto the MJ schedule of Sunday to rest it? Or should I just keep Monday as my Sunday
In So. Calif. it is so dry and warm so far this year that the towell will dry out so fast even with the plate on top....any problem if I wet it a couple of times a day if it does dry out OR just let it be? Any suggestions welcome. Thanks, Cathy

Thanks, Cathy


Reply author: chessie
Replied on: Feb 02 2009 07:30:51 AM
Message:

Mary, Welcome! The full title of MaryJane's first book is "MaryJane's Ideabook, Cookbook, Lifebook -For the farmgirl in all of us!" and I just shorten it to "Lifebook" for posting. Here's a link to getting a copy from MaryJanesFarm -be sure to make a note that you want it autographed! Best investment you'll ever make...
http://shopping.maryjanesfarm.org/s.nl/it.A/id.635/.f?sc=2&category=70

have a great day, karen

www.edgehillherbfarm.com "where the name is bigger than the farm, but no one seems to mind"
blog http://edgehillherbfarmer.spaces.live.com/default.aspx?wa=wsignin1.0
happy farmgirl #89


Reply author: chessie
Replied on: Feb 02 2009 07:36:27 AM
Message:

Cathy, My towel is drying out too! I just keep wetting it when I am nearby which is infrequently and everything has been fine.
Your mother doesn't know the schedule so you can change it to suit your needs and she won't mind. If you didn't bake last week then remove some starter as if you did and start feeding the mother again until the day you want to bake and now you are on the schedule you want...and everyone's happy.
Have fun, karen

www.edgehillherbfarm.com "where the name is bigger than the farm, but no one seems to mind"
blog http://edgehillherbfarmer.spaces.live.com/default.aspx?wa=wsignin1.0
happy farmgirl #89


Reply author: Amie C.
Replied on: Feb 02 2009 07:37:11 AM
Message:

I had the heavy loaf/no rise problem the first Saturday I baked, so I just want to report that I got much better results this weekend. Delicious, in fact!

I'm not sure if that's because my starter was a week older and that much more mature, or if it's because I set the dough to rise on top of a heating pad (low setting). Either way, lovely bread.

I did make another rookie mistake in following the directions. I was doing the pan-free bread baked on a cookie sheet. Mary Jane's recipe says to make "2 grapefruit-sized loafs" or "4 orange-sized loafs". Well, when I looked at the "sticky water balloon" of dough in my hands, it looked like I had 1 grapefruit. So I just made 1 loaf, and as it rose it burst and spread all over the place. No big deal, but I got a very wide, flat loaf. I think perhaps the instructions mean to say "grapefruit-sized after rising". Either that or my conception of what a grapefruit looks like is way overblown.

Bottom line: make 2 loaves, whether it looks like a grapefruit to you or not.


Reply author: roselake
Replied on: Feb 02 2009 07:51:37 AM
Message:

Today was the forth day since starting mother. She's looks great, but smells really strong. Almost like a sour milk. I'm assuming thats fine. I had to change her to a large bowl as she rose and took over the towel on top of her. Medium size was too small. lol I also realized i'm adding a little too much water each time. A 1/3 flour and 1/3 water was what i was adding then i saw someone said 1/4 water so maybe thats why she rose so much. I'm using Gold medal organic flour as that was all that was available here. I usually use unbleached Sapphire flour for all my baking. I hope the gold medal works well. I'm also going to check the place where we get flour in 50lbs to see if they have organic flour available too. You guys are awesome! I love reading thru the posts and getting all the tips. I wish my magazine would come! :)


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 02 2009 08:14:17 AM
Message:

Karen - it is probably not necessary to rewet your towel during the day but it is up to you. It should be fine if the towel dries out.

Amie - I thought my two grapefruit sized loaves looked small at first too. I baked one as a whole loaf and had a lot of horizontal spreading too. I wanted a bigger loaf though. I think I am going to try something a little different next week. I am going to allow the dough to rise in a bowl about 3 or 4 hours then tranfer it to a baking sheet and allow it to rise only about an hour and then bake it. MAYBE this will prevent it from spreading.

Anne - go to the very first page of this topic and there is a link to the whole article! You don't have to wait for the magazine!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 02 2009 08:15:22 AM
Message:

Here is that link
http://www.maryjanesfarm.org/Recipes-Patterns-Instructions/no-knead_bread.asp

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Feb 02 2009 08:37:24 AM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by maerwert

Hello everyone,
I'm new at this forum and I don't know what Mary Jane's Lifebook is. Is it at a web address or is it a publication? Anyway, I would like the recipe for the sourdough bisquits please.
Thanks for all of the great info on this project.
berrypatchmom



Welcome to the forum, Mary!

MaryJane's Lifebook was her first book that she published. It’s 416 pages with more than 600 photographs and illustrations; farm kitchen recipes; make-it-easy how to’s; outpost advice; and old-fashioned tips, hints and values. She also has since published 2 more books MaryJane's Stitching Room and MaryJane's Outpost. You can buy one or all three here:
http://www.maryjanesfarm.org/booksandgifts.html

MaryJane also has a main website: www.maryjanesfarm.org
On the main page you can explore the options with the bi-monthly magazine that she publishes including extras found here : http://www.maryjanesfarm.org/Recipes-Patterns-Instructions/

She also has products that she sells online, including AMAZING Chocolates and Organic food that all it needs is boiling water added- as she says "Fast food that isn't Junk"
http://www.maryjanesfarm.org/categories/products.asp

There is much more, including information about here Bed and Breakfast, Farmgirl U, the farmgirl Sisterhood where you can earn merit badges. Have fun exploring the site- there is so much wonderful information it, and of course the forum here is an amazing wealth of fun personalities and information!

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: chessie
Replied on: Feb 02 2009 08:39:09 AM
Message:

Thanks Julie! I'm glad to know that. You know we are having a heat wave here in Southern California? My hair dried this morning before i got done washing it... so the towel on top of my MaryJane is always dry by the time i get near it these days.
Happy day to you, karen

www.edgehillherbfarm.com "where the name is bigger than the farm, but no one seems to mind"
blog http://edgehillherbfarmer.spaces.live.com/default.aspx?wa=wsignin1.0
happy farmgirl #89


Reply author: Quintessential Kate
Replied on: Feb 02 2009 08:51:53 AM
Message:

I keep a small spray bottle filled with purified water....and spritz "Ma's" towel when it dries out.
Ciao, Kate

Heart of Texas
Chapter
AKA: Hot Farmgirl #234
http://quintessentialkate.blogspot.com

Today is my best day!


Reply author: gardenmaam
Replied on: Feb 02 2009 10:03:30 AM
Message:

OK - just now mixed up first batch of Farmhouse Bread and have it sittin in it's cast iron pan to rise today. (thinking psitive here!) It is very thick and dense....not sticky at all! Followed the recipe exactly. Anyone else have this result? Not supposed to add water, right? Curious.
Will post end result later tonight.


Reply author: wooliespinner
Replied on: Feb 02 2009 10:29:16 AM
Message:

I am on my 3rd loaf of bread. I have had my mother going for 3 weeks now. This last loaf of bread I made was the farmhouse bread. It was really really super sour. Is it suppose to get that sour ? I have had sourdough at Panara Bread and it was much milder than mine. I know when I smell the "mother" its smells like super strong beer. You can smell it when you come in the house.

My last loaf was super sour but didn't rise as well as the first two. But we had an ice storm and have not had power for over 7 days now.I know that is probably effecting the rise.The first loaf of bread I made was sour and really good but this last loaf I just can't get over how sour it is. Its that strong !! lol... I am not complaining here just a little worried if this is normal....lol.
I am typing this post while our little generator is running. Thank goodness we have a little power for the computer,the freezers, and we have a gas cooking stove to cook on.

Is there something I can do to tone down the sourness a little without totally ruining the recipe? My family...especialy my 2 sons didn't seem to like it quite so strong. They like the raisin/cinm. bread much better I guess because it was sweeter.

Thanks
Linda

Raspberry Run Farm
Nubian Dairy Goats


Reply author: chessie
Replied on: Feb 02 2009 11:14:30 AM
Message:

Kate, that's a great tip. WDITOT? (why didn't i think of that?) Thanks. In this heatwave i'll spray myself too!
Love, Karen

www.edgehillherbfarm.com "where the name is bigger than the farm, but no one seems to mind"
blog http://edgehillherbfarmer.spaces.live.com/default.aspx?wa=wsignin1.0
happy farmgirl #89


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 02 2009 12:59:54 PM
Message:

Mary - I am working on a recipe for biscuits that I will post later tonight if my internet at home is fixed or will post first thing in the morning.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Feb 02 2009 1:28:19 PM
Message:

Linda- I was doing some reading on the internet that says to feed more water/flour if you want your starter to be less sour. Also if your starter starts producing hooch- pour it off as that can contribute the the sourness as well. Also I have noticed that the more often I bake with the starter the less sour it is.

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: LisaTwo
Replied on: Feb 02 2009 3:58:26 PM
Message:

Thanks for the advise. I am so determined to do this right, but...when do you know your mother is beyond fixing? I'd rather start over then keep feeding a messed up mother. Sorry, that sounds funny. Thanks in advance!

Lisa


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Feb 02 2009 5:53:25 PM
Message:

Hi Lisa!

If your starter shows activity in the say 3 hours after feeding her (bubbles forming on top and throughout the starter) then she is alive. If she turns black, red, pink etc then she has been contaminated with something bad and needs to be sent to her grave and a new mother needs to be started.

What does your starter look like say and hour or three after you feed her?

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: kofarmgirl
Replied on: Feb 02 2009 6:11:36 PM
Message:

Ok, this is my first time to reply. I love the bread and all of your responses are very much appreciated. Alee thanks for the math equation. I really needed it.


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Feb 02 2009 6:15:18 PM
Message:

Welcome to the forum Kandra!

I am so glad it helped!

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: K-Falls Farmgirl
Replied on: Feb 02 2009 6:21:21 PM
Message:

MAking another deliciious loaf or two small ones tomorrow Yipeeeeeeee I am out of bread just in time.. CAn't wait for dinner tomorrow..

Cheryl
Farmgirl #309


Almost daily posts at:
http://www.k-fallsfarmgirl.blogspot.com/
Come visit the barn at http://barndoorcreations.blogspot.com/

The secret of staying young is to live honestly, eat slowly, and lie about your age... Lucille Ball


Reply author: lara916
Replied on: Feb 02 2009 7:29:05 PM
Message:

I love seeing all these pics. I am filing away all the tips...mine isn't in a ceramic bowl as melamine is all I had. Forgive me I am a 50's throwback. It's looking good though, I think! I named her Mother Bea, well because of the Bee Issue I suppose! Here she is, I hope that this isn't too large.





Lara #327

"Boots" Becker Homestead Farmgirls


Reply author: lara916
Replied on: Feb 02 2009 7:30:40 PM
Message:

oops I should add that this is day two.

Lara #327

"Boots" Becker Homestead Farmgirls


Reply author: K-Falls Farmgirl
Replied on: Feb 02 2009 7:41:01 PM
Message:

Looks good to me.. nice & bubbly..

Cheryl
Farmgirl #309


Almost daily posts at:
http://www.k-fallsfarmgirl.blogspot.com/
Come visit the barn at http://barndoorcreations.blogspot.com/

The secret of staying young is to live honestly, eat slowly, and lie about your age... Lucille Ball


Reply author: Libbie
Replied on: Feb 03 2009 06:43:41 AM
Message:

Hi, there, gals! I'm baking my first loaf of bread today - I know, I'm off schedule - but the dough seemed really too hard - not sticky at all. What consistency is your "mother?" I'm guessing that I can add more water to make it thinner, but how MUCH thinner?!?!?! I LOVE this!!!

XOXO, Libbie

"Farmgirl Sister #10," and proud of it!!!


Reply author: LisaTwo
Replied on: Feb 03 2009 07:07:40 AM
Message:

Dear Alee:

It bubbles after three hours absolutely, but the next day the water has seperated and it smells more like wallpaper paste then mead. It is not pink or black. So I'm gonna keep on feeding her!

Thanks again. I WILL get this right.

Lisa

Imagining a place that's always safe and warm...Come in she said I'll give ya shelter from the storm. Dylan


Reply author: MaryJane
Replied on: Feb 03 2009 07:16:04 AM
Message:

Hi Libbie!
So you have your 2 cups of mother in a bowl. First, stir in the other ingredients like salt or honey or raisins or garlic/olives depending on what kind of bread you're going to make, then dump in the amount of flour the recipe calls for and stir again with the spoon. You'll only be able to stir it so long. When you can't stir it any more because it's essentially a ball with a spoon stuck in it, it's ready to be put into your baking vessel. The consistency at this point would be a handful of dough that you could start to knead on a board (with the addition of some flour) but you aren't going to do that. It'll be a little sticky but not overly so. It won't be runny AT ALL like a batter. It's a nice ball of dough that has pulled back from the sides of the bowl. Does that help???? Go back to the pics I posted of my dough in a bowl (with a spoon). I wish I had time to produce a quick video. It's on my list of things to do! But everyone here is doing such a good job. I love how a community of women gets the job done!


MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~


Reply author: Libbie
Replied on: Feb 03 2009 07:52:26 AM
Message:

Hi, MaryJane!!! That helps tremendously. I think I actually have it right! I'll be baking it this evening, so I'll report back on the results, but I have high hopes now! I WAS thinking that the "stickiness" would be more like batter, so this helps a lot. I went back and checked the photos - that was just what I needed. THANK YOU!!!

XOXO, Libbie

"Farmgirl Sister #10," and proud of it!!!


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 03 2009 07:59:51 AM
Message:

Lisa the liquid that is seperating out is called Hooch. It is the alcohol that is produced during the feeding process. This is not bad it just means your starter is hungry and has consumed all the food (flour) that you gave it. It means it is ready to eat again. It can be stirred back in to the starter. If there is a lot you can pour a little bit of it off. You can also minimize the hooch by adding a little bit of extra flour when you feed. Start with a tablespoon and see if that helps. there is no need to restart your starter. This alcohol is what adds to the sour flavor of your dough.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: K-Falls Farmgirl
Replied on: Feb 03 2009 08:11:45 AM
Message:

Today is bake day for me too.. I have my dough rising. I am going to try to bake it in a pottery pan, one loaf. The pan is Pampered chef deep dish pie pan. I lined it with parchment paper & hope to have a nice yummy loaf as it was last time.. Has anyone else baked theirs in a pan other than cast iron?

Cheryl
Farmgirl #309


Almost daily posts at:
http://www.k-fallsfarmgirl.blogspot.com/
Come visit the barn at http://barndoorcreations.blogspot.com/

The secret of staying young is to live honestly, eat slowly, and lie about your age... Lucille Ball


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 03 2009 08:17:57 AM
Message:

Here are some recipes for biscuits.

Sourdough Buttermilk Biscuits
1/2 cup of buttermilk
1 cup of sourdough starter
2 cups of all purpose flour
1 teaspoon of salt
1/2 teaspoon of baking soda
1 teaspoon of baking powder
1/2 cup of butter
Melted butter in a small bowl mix together starter and buttermilk. In a large bowl mix together flour, salt, baking powder and soda. Using a pastry blender or fork, cut in butter until mixture resembles cornmeal. Gradually add the starter mixture to the flour mixture and mix with a wooden spoon. Stir mixture until a soft dough is formed that cleans the sides of the bowl. Turn out onto a floured surface and roll to ½ inch thickness. Cut biscuits with round cutter. Place in lightly greased baking pan with sides touching. Brush tops with melted butter. Cover and let rest for 30 minutes. Bake at 425ºF. for 12 to 15 minutes. Makes about 1 dozen biscuits.


Sourdough Whole Wheat Biscuits

2 cups of whole wheat flour
2 teaspoons of baking powder
1/2 teaspoon of salt
1/2 cup of butter
2 cups of sourdough starter
Sift dry ingredients into a bowl. Cut in the butter until mixture resembles cornmeal. Work in the starter until well blended. Turn out onto floured surface and roll dough to thickness of about 1/2 inch. Cut into rounds with biscuit cutter; place on lightly greased cookie sheet. Bake at 425ºF. for about 12 to 15 minutes or until golden. Makes about 1 dozen biscuits.


Basic Sourdough Biscuits

2 cups of flour
1 teaspoon of baking soda
1/2 teaspoon of salt
1 tablespoon of sugar
1/2 teaspoon of baking powder
1/4 cup of butter
1 cup of sourdough starter

Mix all the dry ingredients and cut in butter until the mixture resembles cornmeal. Moisten with sourdough starter. Turn on to a floured surface and roll 1/2 inch thick. Place on greased baking sheet. Bake at 425ºF. for 12 to 15 minutes or until golden. Makes about 1 dozen biscuits.

www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 03 2009 08:21:31 AM
Message:

Cheryl I baked a loaf on a pampered chef sheet pan last week. It turned out fine but did spread a little during the rise. I think next time I'm gonna try doing the rise in a bowl and then only let it rise on the pan for the last hour to minimize the spreading. Depending on the size of your loaf though the sides on that deep dish pan may prevent it from spreading too much.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: K-Falls Farmgirl
Replied on: Feb 03 2009 08:31:38 AM
Message:

Thanks Julie, I used two small 6 in cast iron skillets last week.. They worked fine, I think this bread will not rise as much and it will be a bigger flatter loaf, which is fine.. Experimenting with different pans.. I want to get a cast iron one like MJ has shown in the magazine..I keep looking at thriftstores...

Cheryl
Farmgirl #309


Almost daily posts at:
http://www.k-fallsfarmgirl.blogspot.com/
Come visit the barn at http://barndoorcreations.blogspot.com/

The secret of staying young is to live honestly, eat slowly, and lie about your age... Lucille Ball


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 03 2009 09:21:11 AM
Message:

I bought one made by lodge and it was only about 25.00. You can order from them online if you have no luck with the thrift store.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: K-Falls Farmgirl
Replied on: Feb 03 2009 09:23:06 AM
Message:

Thanks Julie...I may have to do that..I have a lodge dutch oven, but its a bit too big.. I do love it though...

Cheryl
Farmgirl #309


Almost daily posts at:
http://www.k-fallsfarmgirl.blogspot.com/
Come visit the barn at http://barndoorcreations.blogspot.com/

The secret of staying young is to live honestly, eat slowly, and lie about your age... Lucille Ball


Reply author: strawberyarn
Replied on: Feb 03 2009 09:33:17 AM
Message:

Well yesterday was the BIG day my first loaf of bread from my starter. But as many I had minimal rise and a very dense loaf. This is where these posts have been so helpful. Without them I likely would have chucked the whole thing. I do feel mine is due to a cold house. And although mine has bubbles, not quite the amount that the pictures have shown. So I assume the cold house has slowed down the yeast production. From now on my "mother" will go to bed with me. Yes that is love and devoution. My bedroom has the the space heater and is the warmest room in the house so we will see if that helps me out. I look forward to next Monday and some rise and a lighter loaf fingers crossed till then.


Reply author: country roads
Replied on: Feb 03 2009 10:18:28 AM
Message:

Ok, I have some good news and some bad news. First the good-I warmed up the honey and my round cast iron pot, I kneaded the dough just a bit. Then I formed it into a round loaf and sliced three marks in the top of it. I let it rise on the back of the stove and in the oven overnight. She rose up beautifully! I baked her @ 375* for 30min. It was the most wonderful looking loaf of bread! It was baked to perfection...but, now the bad news-hubby and I discovered we don't like the taste of it :( We loved the texture but its just to sour tasting for our liking. Although I was disappointed in the flavor, I was very happy to have made it from scratch and that it turned out so well. I would love to find a recipe for a white or wheat bread that has the same texture. Oh well! back to the kitchen to try something else :)

Take care, Melissa.

Farmgirl # 352

~Think happy thoughts~


Reply author: olive610
Replied on: Feb 03 2009 11:53:05 AM
Message:

Thanks for the wonderful Biscuit recipes Willow. I am going to try them. I am the 3rd day into week 2 of the starter. Although my first loaf was very dense and flat I am going to keep trying.

I bought a Lodge cast iron pot at Bass Pro Shops. I just checked on-line for stores and pretty much half of the country (the eastern half) has lots of stores if you actually want to go to a brick and mortar store to look at what they have. Unfortunately they are few and far between in the western half of the US. You can shop on-line with them. I bought the 2 quart and it was 29.99. It's a perfect little pot with a lid.

Melissa, Have you ever tried the Herman starter? It is wonderful and does not have that sour taste. It is sweeter. I used to make it constantly when my kids were young. They loved it. The bread was delish as were the pancakes, biscuits, coffee cakes and cinnamon rolls that I made with it. If you would like, I can post the recipe for it or send it to you in an e-mail. I have it in my recipe file on my PC so it would be easy for me to do.

"Life is a great big canvas, and you should throw all the paint on it you can." Danny Kaye


Reply author: sunflowercritters
Replied on: Feb 03 2009 12:46:05 PM
Message:

Hi all tomorrow is going to be a big day for me. Pray that my second time around that the sour dough(bread) will come out. Love the taste but my first batch was very very heavy and hard to cut into.
All you farmgirls pictures look so...good I pray that mine will look like yours soon.
Thank you all for your help in away. Looking forward in the morning

Worry ends Where Faith in God begins.


Reply author: kristin sherrill
Replied on: Feb 03 2009 3:58:05 PM
Message:

I have a ? about whole wheat flour. I have hard red and white and Kamut that I grind fresh. Is it ok to yse this. I can put my grinder on the finest gring to get a more finer flour. And which kind would be best to use? The red has a better flavor and would make the bread darker. Or the white for a lighter bread? The kamut has a great flavor too. I have just been wanting to ask this whenever I see whole wheat called for in a recipe.

And Sunday when it was time to add more flour and water I doubled mine in the week old starter and started another for a friend. So Wed. I will bake more bread. Do I make a doulble batch? Or can I just do one loaf? I am not the brightest light bulb in the pack when it comes to figuring things out. I always need a little help, But once I do anything one time, I'm good to go.

Thanks. And I am so enjoying this thread. Lots of good recipes and suggestions here. I want to try the biscuits, that's why the flour question.

Kris

Turn your face to the sun and the shadows fall behind you. Maori proverb


Reply author: MaryJane
Replied on: Feb 03 2009 4:50:17 PM
Message:

I'd like to run a straw poll (you know a farmer invented that term) and find out who purchased either King Arthur's Organic Bread Flour or King Arthur's Organic All-Purpose Flour and COULD NOT get a good mother started????? If you'd rather write to me off the forum, that's fine. I have something up my sleeve but first I need to know who you are. Thanking you in advance. Write to iris@maryjanesfarm.org

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 03 2009 4:58:58 PM
Message:

Kristin - I believe MaryJane said in an earlier post that as long as it is a hard wheat any of them would work fine. I am using KingArthur Wheat flour. It is a hard red wheat I belive.

You do not have to make a double loaf on wednesday. One loaf will be fine especially if you want to bake again on Saturday.


MaryJane - As you know I am working with both the Bread Flour and the All Purpose flour. I had successful starters from both but much better baking results the 2nd week. Of the two I am preferring the AP flour. It seems to me to have a better consistancy than the bread flour, oddly enough!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: kofarmgirl
Replied on: Feb 03 2009 5:02:47 PM
Message:

Thanks Julie I will try the biscuits tonight. We are having breakfast for dinner!


Reply author: ddmashayekhi
Replied on: Feb 03 2009 5:03:37 PM
Message:

I bought Whole Foods brand, 365 Organic Flour, and it worked beautifully! I made my first two loaves today and to my amazement they came out perfectly! I am quite "bread challenged" and this is the first time I made two perfect loaves! The house smells delicious, they look great and taste even better then they look! Thank you so much for the recipe MaryJane. If it wasn't for you, I would have thrown in the towel for good when it comes to making bread! I

I have to admit that I didn't quite follow the instructions all the way, but miraculously my breads came out! I can't wait to make the next two!

Dawn in IL


Reply author: K-Falls Farmgirl
Replied on: Feb 03 2009 6:17:25 PM
Message:

YUMMY DELICIOUS! this third loaf of bread fromthe original starter is the best yet.. oh My goodness.. I just took it out of the oven and cooled it a bit..You know there is nothing better than fresh bread from the oven.. The sourdough flavor is just like Mary Jane said.. if you have had trouble making it.. keep trying.!

Cheryl
Farmgirl #309


Almost daily posts at:
http://www.k-fallsfarmgirl.blogspot.com/
Come visit the barn at http://barndoorcreations.blogspot.com/

The secret of staying young is to live honestly, eat slowly, and lie about your age... Lucille Ball


Reply author: Julia
Replied on: Feb 03 2009 6:42:20 PM
Message:

Don't know what happened but my first attempt was a flop! I made my mother just like Mother Hen said to, even went to the thrift store to find a nifty cast iron pot to bake it in. Well, I baked it, checked its temp after 20 minutes, but it came out really dense and weird. :( Anyone got a clue what happened?

For tomorrow and its needs I do not pray, but keep me, guide me, love me, Lord just for today.
St. Augustine

#440


Reply author: kristin sherrill
Replied on: Feb 03 2009 7:16:30 PM
Message:

Thank you Julie. I will try it tomorrow with half hard white and see what happens.

And I am using the KA all purpose organic. So far my first attempt this past Sat. was great. This next time I will use a heavy loaf pan. My hubby loves it!! But we will alternate with our whole wheat bread, just for the fiber.

Kris

Turn your face to the sun and the shadows fall behind you. Maori proverb


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Feb 03 2009 8:15:17 PM
Message:

Hi MaryJane-

I am using the Bob's Red Mill brand flour and it is working fabulously!

Hi Julia- how old was your starter? It seems the baby starters (in the first week) are a little underachieving in the rising category. Keep feeding her and try to let you dough rise in a warm environment to give the yeast their best chance.

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: curbside
Replied on: Feb 03 2009 8:17:37 PM
Message:

I'm determined to get this right but I'm a little discouraged. I started out 2 1/2 weeks ago and followed the instructions to a tee. The dough felt great and I chose to try the farmhouse white loaves. I shaped them and placed them on a stoneware cookie tray. Instead of rising, the dough flattened out and ended u p loking like a white cow flap. I tossed them in the garbage and had to wait another week before I had 2 cups again to start another bread. Sanme thing happened the second time. I let the dough "rise" for close to 24 hours and when it wasn't rising I baked it to see what would happen but it just turned into a one inch high mass of dough. I think my house may be too cool for any of this to be working. Can someone help me out. I will be able to try another approach this weekend when I have yet another 2 cups to work with, Thanks.


Reply author: Erica Lea
Replied on: Feb 04 2009 05:10:01 AM
Message:

Hello Ladies,
I have been reading this forum, but this is the first time I have had a chance to post. I started my mother on 1/17 and she started a little slow. By the second week (last weekend) I had a beautiful loaf of bread. I used the recipe for Multi-grain Bread, but I put half KA White Whole Wheat flour and half KA bread flour. It has been really lovely. We have been really enjoying making it into PB&Js.

Interestingly, as I started to feed my mother again this week it was rising very rapidly. When I came home from work on Monday and went to wet Mother's towel I found that she had risen to within a half inch of the top of the bowl (the same as it had looked on the previous Friday). I was so surprised I just stared at it for several minutes. We ended up having breakfast for dinner. I took out enough starter to make the Sourdough Pancakes (which were absolutely delicious!) She seemed very active again yesterday. Has anyone else experienced this?

Erica

Happiness is not something ready made. It comes from your own actions.
-Dalai Lama


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 04 2009 06:47:36 AM
Message:

Julia - keep at it! this seems common with the youg starters. Give it another week or so and you will see better results.

Jane - I experience a lot of spreading when doing the free form style loafs. If you use a pan that holds the bread tight it will have more of a vertical rise. You could also put your pan in a cold oven with the light on while you let it rise. The warmth from the light will help with the rise.

Erica - I have noticed a lot of rise in my starter on some days. When I stir it is seems to settle back down. I don't think it is a problem. We are having the waffles on Saturday and I cant wait cause they are so good!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: curbside
Replied on: Feb 04 2009 07:29:30 AM
Message:

Thanks Julie -

The article said to either use a covered cast iron pan, which I don't have...or a cookie sheet. I figured the stoneware sheet was the closest thing I had but I think you're right, something with sides would probably help. I'm still thinking that it's probably too cold in here. It's usually 60 in the house. I'll try the light in the oven and see if that helps. Usually when I bake bread, I stick a pan of hot water in the oven and place the dough in there to rise. It keeps it warm and free from drafts. I'm just not really sure if the starter is where it should be because I'm not getting it to rise at all...ever. This weekend will be my third attempt. Wish me luck!

Jane


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 04 2009 08:04:40 AM
Message:

Jane I used a stoneware pan and placed heating pad on low underneath it. I still got a lot of spreading though.

Where is Milan, NH? I grew up in Quechee VT right over the border from Lebanon, NH.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: curbside
Replied on: Feb 04 2009 09:03:36 AM
Message:

Hi Julie -

I took the cloth off today to add the flour and water and I saw 2 spots of blue mold on the top 1/3 of the bowl where the starter had splattered when I'd mixed it. I'm thinking that maybe I'll pitch it and wait until it's warmer. The heating pad idea is a good one. I used to heat my oven to the lowest it would go, turn it off, put in a pan of hot water on the bottom rack and then put my bowl of dough on the next rack up covered in a warm damp cloth. worked every time. This no yeast thing is new to me and I was so hoping it would work, but I'm getting a little discouraged.

Quechee, Vermont is beautiful. My son lives in Woodstock! I moved from CT to Milan 7 years ago. Milan is about 12 miles north of Berlin. An hour east of St. J and maybe 2 hours north of Quechee. Where are you now?


Reply author: lara916
Replied on: Feb 04 2009 09:54:11 AM
Message:

I have a question about what can be put back into the Mother. I read online that in the past a piece of the bread baked from the Mother would be folded back into it. I like the continuity of this, the full circle. That we give back a part of what we take from the Mother in order to sustain her.

So has anyone ever done this? If I do will it be broken down and dissolve or just leave me with dried crusty bread in my Mother sponge?

Thanks! Lara

Lara #327

"Boots" Becker Homestead Farmgirls


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 04 2009 10:48:47 AM
Message:

Jane that is so funny! My mom worked in Woodstock at Billings Farm as I was growing up and I was born in Connecticut and lived there until I was 9!!!!! Funny! I live in Arkansas now.

I'm not sure about the mold on the side. I try to keep my sides scraped down pretty well so I haven't seen this. Maybe someone else can chime in here.

Lara - I have not heard of this. I'll do some research and see what i can find out.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: K-Falls Farmgirl
Replied on: Feb 04 2009 11:02:53 AM
Message:

I posted earlier that my third attempt using the original mother worked best.
Alee, I used Bob's Red Mill organic flour also and I baked it in a Pampered Chef deep dish pie pan this time and it. It spread out a bit in the dish and baked to about 2 1/2 inches high. Great flavor and texture. I let it rise all day from 7 am-5 pm baked until internal temp was 200 on the parchment paper. The first time I forgot to fill the cupcake tin with water to give moisture while cooking. I do not now if I would use the "mother " if there was mold on it. I thinkk I would start over.

Cheryl
Farmgirl #309


Almost daily posts at:
http://www.k-fallsfarmgirl.blogspot.com/
Come visit the barn at http://barndoorcreations.blogspot.com/

The secret of staying young is to live honestly, eat slowly, and lie about your age... Lucille Ball


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Feb 04 2009 12:35:20 PM
Message:

I would throw away any starter that has mold growing as well.

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: kristin sherrill
Replied on: Feb 04 2009 12:36:53 PM
Message:

Why was my dough not gooey? It's very firm and I did exactly like the recipe says for the farmhouse white. But it's just not sticky gooey like in the picture in the mag. It's rising nicely on the fireplace mantle again. But it's not a gooey bubbly mass like Alee's is. I am baking mine today in a heavy bread pan. It's so cold here the past few days I've moved my starter in to the dining room where it's warmer.

Kris



Turn your face to the sun and the shadows fall behind you. Maori proverb


Reply author: pearlgirl
Replied on: Feb 04 2009 12:45:51 PM
Message:

Well, my second loaf I made from 1 1/2 week old starter turned out bea-u-tiful! It only took two hours to double its size since I gave it a very warm environment (the heater/laundry room)and slightly warmed my cast iron pan on the stove top. It wasn't very sour either.

Last night I read for about an hour on sourdoughhome.com about all the whys and hows of sourdough. It was really enlightening. He said on there that the longer it takes to rise (i.e. the less natural yeast is in your loaf) the more sour it will be. The faster rise (like my 2 hour batch) don't give the bacteria long enough to make it sour. Today when I made the Farmhouse Wheat (I use half or more Prairie Gold - hard white - wheat) I let it rise in a cooler area and it took 4 hours to double in size and it is more pleasantly sour than my last batch. I just took it out of the oven, heavenly!

Now here are some pictures of my bread from Monday at 1 1/2 weeks old. I used half or more white wheat and let my stand mixer knead it about 5 minutes (to develop the gluten or elasticity). I baked it in a cast iron chicken fryer and make only 1 loaf instead of 2 small ones. It spread out and was only about 2 or 3 inches high, but it had perfect texture inside so I was satisfied. If I want to make it for sandwiches I will use my glass bread pan.


Ready to Rise




Ready to Bake



Ready to Eat!!


Favour is deceitful, and beauty is vain: but a woman that feareth the LORD, she shall be praised. Give her of the fruit of her hands; and let her own works praise her in the gates.
Pro 31:30,31

http://pearlsgleanings.blogspot.com/
http://www.pearlgirl901.etsy.com/


Reply author: Julia
Replied on: Feb 04 2009 4:41:35 PM
Message:

Thanks Alee and Julie, I will keep at it. The Ravens did enjoy the first loaf this morning in the backyard. Hopefully the next one will be for me!

For tomorrow and its needs I do not pray, but keep me, guide me, love me, Lord just for today.
St. Augustine

#440


Reply author: Ronna
Replied on: Feb 04 2009 6:00:28 PM
Message:

Using a piece of "old bread" is more commonly used in making rye bread. The common practice in old days of saving a chunk of the dough for the next baking is what is correctly a 'mother'. Many here have chosen to call a starter a 'mother' and there is a difference. I believe I related many pages back that my MIL (born in 1904)told me of her mother and grandmother saving dough from one baking to next on the shelf above the cookstove. The pioneers would put the mother in the flour barrel to keep it safe and insulated from heat or cold.


Reply author: maerwert
Replied on: Feb 04 2009 6:08:32 PM
Message:

Hello everyone,
I have had good results with Bob's Red Mill unbleached organic flour and a glass bread pan, sprayed with oil and dusted with cornmeal. My kitchen temperture varies between 60 to 70 degrees and Mother has kept working. Rising has been in the oven with the light on. Best results for browning the bottom of the loaf were obtained when using 2 small muffin pans placed on the bottom rack and on each side of the loaf pan (the loaf is on the middle rack). In this way the steam can surround the loaf but the heat gets to the bottom of the pan to brown it. The top sometimes gets a little too brown so it gets a foil cover after 15 - 20 minutes. Haven't found a cast iron pan yet. Internal temp. of 200 degrees is perfect. Baking temp. for the glass pan was 400 degrees.
I tried the rye recipe today and it is awesome. Appreciate the information you have all given. One hint: make sure to spoon your flour "loosely" into the measuring cup for accurate measure.
Thank you all for your help.
I posted a Herman recipe on the Herman Topic page. It is much more cake like and not calorie concious.

berrypatchmom


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 04 2009 7:25:31 PM
Message:

Thanks Ronna! I understand about saving some of the dough but how does it work to use an old piece of bread? I don't get that part!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Ronna
Replied on: Feb 04 2009 7:34:46 PM
Message:

Julie, I believe it's supposed to add to the flavor, but would have to research my ever shrinking brain cells or the book where it's specifically part of the process. Think it's "Secrets of a Jewish Baker" or close to that title. I honestly don't know that I've heard of it being done with sourdough. I was looking for a specific Mexican cookbook today and realized I have about 40 just on bread. They're mostly grouped together, but need to do the same with the rest for easier reference..and also clear out a whole bunch.


Reply author: curbside
Replied on: Feb 04 2009 7:47:02 PM
Message:

Julie -
I tossed the starter. Those two drops of mold on the side of the bowl bothered me. Too bad, I've been at it for almost 3 weeks and never got a loaf. Oh well, maybe I'll try again in a month or so when it's hopefully warmer.
I've never posted to this site until today and I have a feeling bread is the topic here but I have to ask you where in CT you're from. I lived there all my life until I moved north 7 years ago. What a small world. We hiked the trails behind my sons house in the fall and ended up on top of a mountain. From where we were there was a beautiful view of the Billings museum. I've never actually been there but I think I'll check it out this spring. I really like Woodstock.


Reply author: chessie
Replied on: Feb 04 2009 7:55:22 PM
Message:

Ronna - I am so impressed with you, your knowledge and your library. Please tell me a little about yourself and how you came to be so interested in baking and sourdough...are you a professional chef? If not, then may I ask, what are you?
Don't you love how MaryJane's sourdough example has brought us all this fun, fellowship and flavor?
I'm lovin' it. -Karen

www.edgehillherbfarm.com "where the name is bigger than the farm, but no one seems to mind"
blog http://edgehillherbfarmer.spaces.live.com/default.aspx?wa=wsignin1.0
happy farmgirl #89


Reply author: Celticheart
Replied on: Feb 04 2009 8:29:21 PM
Message:

I just used regular unbleached flour--because I had it and didn't want to buy more--and mixed it with my own home ground flour--about half and half. So far it's worked great. This week is even better than last week. I get my red wheat from a farmer friend. We trade for eggs.

"Nature always has the last laugh." Mrs. Greenthumbs


Reply author: Ronna
Replied on: Feb 04 2009 8:56:55 PM
Message:

Karen, I have to laugh...what am I??? A 62 yr old mother and grandmother who is a sales rep for Hasbro Toys, which has nothing to do with baking bread. I first learned to bake bread from my future MIL when I was 8 and spending the summer with my Dad here in NV. Had no clue she would be my MIL 8 short years later..don't know that I even knew her sons then. I started to cook about that time and have always been an avid reader of anything educational, including cookbooks. Mother did not care what I made as long as I cleaned up the kitchen when I was done. My first pie was Lemon Meringue because my older sister loved it and that was quite an adventure. By 9, I was making dinner for the family, including doing the grocery shopping. All these years later, I still love to cook and bake. Is that more than you wanted to know?
Yes, it is gratifying to know woman (and men) are still wanting to bake bread and all the other "back to basic" skills. Our grandmothers had no choice unless they were wealthy and could pay hired help. All in all, MaryJane has allowed us a wonderful forum to learn, visit, share and enjoy so much that is important. I've made some life long friends along the way. For that alone, I'm grateful for the opportunity.
I've somewhat backed out of the discussions because not all of my bread thoughts are the same as MaryJanes and don't want to interfere with her wanting to share her methods. I don't want to confuse anyone, but more than happy to share what I've learned all these years.


Reply author: chessie
Replied on: Feb 04 2009 9:20:49 PM
Message:

Wow, Ronna, thanks for sharing! Exactly what I wanted to know. I can only imagine how great it is for your grandkids that you are a Hasbro toy rep! My grandmother was a bank teller and as a kid, i can remember wishing she was a sales clerk at the toy store two doors down from the bank.
My first pie was pumpkin at age 14 or so and I am still spending all my time in the kitchen all these years (36 [almost]) later.
I love learning about baking, reading about baking, talking about baking, eating my baking and, of course, actually baking.


www.edgehillherbfarm.com "where the name is bigger than the farm, but no one seems to mind"
blog http://edgehillherbfarmer.spaces.live.com/default.aspx?wa=wsignin1.0
happy farmgirl #89


Reply author: Ronna
Replied on: Feb 04 2009 9:34:14 PM
Message:

My grandson is nearly 19 and never did care about action figures, which means I don't know one Star Wars/Transformers/IndianaJones/GIJoe/Hulk/etc from another..not true, I do know Yoda, R2D2 and a few of those guys. My son (nearly 35) was/is a Diecast collector and daughter (46)still loves Barbie, so guess I'm with the wrong company...but I do love my job.
Love my baking and cooking and it shows, too :) Eating out just to be eating out is not always a pleasure for those who are good cooks.


Reply author: lara916
Replied on: Feb 05 2009 06:16:13 AM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by Ronna

Using a piece of "old bread" is more commonly used in making rye bread. The common practice in old days of saving a chunk of the dough for the next baking is what is correctly a 'mother'. Many here have chosen to call a starter a 'mother' and there is a difference. I believe I related many pages back that my MIL (born in 1904)told me of her mother and grandmother saving dough from one baking to next on the shelf above the cookstove. The pioneers would put the mother in the flour barrel to keep it safe and insulated from heat or cold.



Ahh, thank you Ronna this is very interesting!

Lara #327

"Boots" Becker Homestead Farmgirls


Reply author: AuntPammy
Replied on: Feb 05 2009 06:55:27 AM
Message:

Tomorrow will be another big test day for me.I have doubled the recipe and I am planning on using my glass "bread" pans this time around. While the free formed loaves were delicious I would like some for sandwiches and so I am going to try the pans. I thought of using my cast iron dutch oven but I'm afraid it is too big. The glass pans I have came with lids so they should do o.k..I guess the pans aren't really bread pans as they are round like the cast iron sauce pan that Mary Jane used. I hope I get the same delicious flavor as last week-I have noticed though that I don't seem to have the "hooch" on top this week. I do notice the beer smell though and last week I thought it was just faint.

"Keep your face to the sunshine and you will never see the shadow." Helen Keller

www.auntpsalmostheaven.blogspot.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 05 2009 08:20:45 AM
Message:

Pam I am noticing less hooch and more bubbling/rising of my starter during the day. This is an indication that the starter is being well fed. Hooch indicates the starter is hungry.

I am wondering if there are any cast iron loaf pans out there!? I haven't seen any but that would be nice to have!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 05 2009 08:32:18 AM
Message:

Jane - I am sorry about the mold problem. I try to keep the sides of the bowl scraped down. MaryJane recommends transferring the starter and washing the bowl out once a month or so. I try to do mine every two weeks. That is a real bummer. I don't think the cool temperatures should effect it. Mold tends to grow better in a warm, moist environment. Were you covering it with a damp towel? You should use cool or cold water for this. I hope your next attempt goes better.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: chessie
Replied on: Feb 05 2009 08:39:50 AM
Message:

Julie, Guess what? I found a cast iron loaf pan on monday at HomeGoods! I am so excited. It is preseasoned and, according to the bottom, it is made by "Old Mountain" c.2008. It was less than ten bucks and really nice. I'll be trying it out on sat...
this week, my hooch is less too and more bubbly. I strive to be like her today -bubbly because I'm well fed.

www.edgehillherbfarm.com "where the name is bigger than the farm, but no one seems to mind"
blog http://edgehillherbfarmer.spaces.live.com/default.aspx?wa=wsignin1.0
happy farmgirl #89


Reply author: AuntPammy
Replied on: Feb 05 2009 08:56:51 AM
Message:

I found the 2 qt. sauce pots at Kitchen Collection. I haven't bought any yet as I gave my DH a big,no hugh hint that I wanted one or two!!! I'm thinking it won't be candy and roses this year for Valentines day-cast iron for me all the way!!!lol

"Keep your face to the sunshine and you will never see the shadow." Helen Keller

www.auntpsalmostheaven.blogspot.com


Reply author: gardenmaam
Replied on: Feb 05 2009 09:20:36 AM
Message:

Julie - Hi there! How would you describe HOOCH in the starter? I am guessing it is the liquid that I see on top of the mother sometimes.Not sure though. Is it OK to stir that in during the day? Or once I've added the flour n water in the AM does one need to not disturb it?

ALSO - anyone....my first batch of dough Monday was very thick; not stickey. I am wondering if it could be our dry, warm weather out here on in SoCal. Today I added just a touch more water than the 1/4 cup to see how that goes. Every morning I come into the kitchen...lift her towell and hope that it looks good. So far, so good! Thank everyone...this is a fun project.


Reply author: gardenmaam
Replied on: Feb 05 2009 09:23:30 AM
Message:

Lydia -Very nic pics of your bread! Looks so yummy :@)


Reply author: Suzan
Replied on: Feb 05 2009 09:24:52 AM
Message:

Cathy, This is what Mary Jane said a few pages back, and this described mine exactly:

"So you have your 2 cups of mother in a bowl. First, stir in the other ingredients like salt or honey or raisins or garlic/olives depending on what kind of bread you're going to make, then dump in the amount of flour the recipe calls for and stir again with the spoon. You'll only be able to stir it so long. When you can't stir it any more because it's essentially a ball with a spoon stuck in it, it's ready to be put into your baking vessel. The consistency at this point would be a handful of dough that you could start to knead on a board (with the addition of some flour) but you aren't going to do that. It'll be a little sticky but not overly so. It won't be runny AT ALL like a batter. It's a nice ball of dough that has pulled back from the sides of the bowl. Does that help???? Go back to the pics I posted of my dough in a bowl (with a spoon). I wish I had time to produce a quick video. It's on my list of things to do! But everyone here is doing such a good job. I love how a community of women gets the job done!"


Reply author: gardenmaam
Replied on: Feb 05 2009 09:59:16 AM
Message:

Suzan - Yeah, I had read that about the lump of dough with a spoon stuck in it - and it was just like mine in that way! HA!

I think what had me questioning or stumped was that in the mag. article it had said.....

Spoon your mass of sticky, gooey bread dough into the pan.

I think I kinda got hung up on thinking mine should have been a bit stickier. We'll see how this coming Monday - baking day goes. Thanks again!


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 05 2009 10:46:47 AM
Message:

Cathy - Yes the hooch is the liquid that forms on top. It is fine to stir it back in. It is actually an alcohol byproduct caused by the feeding process. It will help add to your "sour" in the sourdough. If you have excessive amounts you want to add a little extra flour (about a tbs.)when you feed. You can also pour a little of the alcohol off if there is a lot. I have found that as mine gets older the hooch has gotten to be less.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: kristin sherrill
Replied on: Feb 05 2009 1:26:45 PM
Message:

Hey this is where my pictures are about the sourdough bread that I made last week. Check it out.
http://s378.photobucket.com/albums/oo221/outbackfarm/


Turn your face to the sun and the shadows fall behind you. Maori proverb


Reply author: sunflowercritters
Replied on: Feb 05 2009 1:48:36 PM
Message:

Hi all I baked off my second attempt of bread. It came out better then first time around but still haveing hard time for it to rise. It looked like flat pancakes. Your loafs of bread looks.....so....good and nice looking. what am I doing wrong

Worry ends Where Faith in God begins.


Reply author: sunflowercritters
Replied on: Feb 05 2009 1:54:00 PM
Message:

Hi Kristin your pictures of your sourdough was beautiful...My is very sadlooking. help what did you do to make it look like that?

Worry ends Where Faith in God begins.


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 05 2009 1:58:15 PM
Message:

Debra what kind of flour are you using? How long are you letting it rise? What is the temperature in the house? What kind of container are you putting it in to rise/bake? I'll see if we cant narrow down the source of the problem.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: urban farm girl
Replied on: Feb 05 2009 4:50:06 PM
Message:

Hi girls! I'm a newbee and also trying the bread and like you Debra my second loaf did not turn out. Both times I set the bread on a baking sheet with the parchment paper and it never did rise and I did bake it...will make a good door stop. I'm going to get a cast iron pot and try that. The flour I'm using is Arrowhead Mills organic unbleached white flour and using the distilled water. I also set the baking sheet on top of the cabinets where its warm. I'm stumped?


Reply author: lara916
Replied on: Feb 05 2009 5:06:45 PM
Message:

Can someone help please? The bubbles in my Mother are suddenly VERY small. I thought that happened when she has used up most of her food?
Will she need to be fed more often if in a very warm location? Please let me know! Thanks! Lara


Lara #327

"Boots" Becker Homestead Farmgirls

eta: I have been keeping her on top of the oven and I do bake alot. Could it be too hot there? thanks in advance!


Reply author: Pearlsnjeans
Replied on: Feb 05 2009 5:30:12 PM
Message:

This was my second baking last Saturday. I tried someone's (can't remember who) tip on turning the oven light on and letting the dough rise inside the oven. Much better than the first week! The flavor was very good and I've enjoyed every bit. However I think it was a bit too done on the bottom. Can I turn down the heat some for baking? Will it have to bake longer that the 20 minutes?




Vicki
Farmgirl Sister #120
Today well lived makes every yesterday a memory of happiness and every tomorrow a vision of hope.


Reply author: lara916
Replied on: Feb 05 2009 5:44:18 PM
Message:

Those looks beautiful Vicki!

Lara #327

"Boots" Becker Homestead Farmgirls


Reply author: lara916
Replied on: Feb 05 2009 6:09:17 PM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by willowtreecreek

Cathy you started will smell very sour. Kinda vinegary or alcohol like. As long as it doesn't smell bad like a nasty gym sock or old chicken it should be fine. Here are a few things to check though: make sure you are using a ceramic (or glass in a pinch) bowl and a wooden spoon. Metal is BAD! Don't let it near your starter! Be sure you are measuring correctly. You started can start to sour too much if it is not fed enough. Check the temperature of your kitchen. The ideal temperature for your started is between 65 and 75 degrees. A little colder is fine but you want to avoid going much warmer. Do not set your starter to close to the stove or oven where temperatures can rise to over 100 when it's in use. Also be sure you are using Purified water. Bottled water is not necessarily purified so make sure it says so.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com




Darn darn! I've been keeping my Mother on the stove. I've moved her can she still be saved? Her bubbles are almost pinpricks right now!

Lara #327

"Boots" Becker Homestead Farmgirls


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Feb 05 2009 6:17:12 PM
Message:

I have noticed that my starter's bubbles are smaller as she has consumed her food. Does she bubble a lot after being fed?

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 05 2009 6:35:21 PM
Message:

Lara if her bubbles are still there you are probably okay. High heat will kill the natural yeast which is why you don't want to get it too warm. If you are getting bubbles after feeding her you should be good to go. Mine seems to have a mind of its own, small bubbles one day, big the next, hooch on some days and then not on others. Just stick with her! Near the stove is okay but if you are baking you probably want to move her away for a little while.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 05 2009 6:36:28 PM
Message:

Melissa - the "free form" type loafs done on a baking sheet are going to spread more than "rise" especially with a young starter.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: urban farm girl
Replied on: Feb 05 2009 6:40:57 PM
Message:

Julie it didn't even spread....it didn't move one bit. Do you think I should start a new starter?


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 05 2009 6:59:49 PM
Message:

How old is your starter? What type of flour and water are you using?

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 05 2009 7:02:18 PM
Message:

Okay I just saw what flour and water you were using so I don't think that is the issue although I am not familiar with that brand of flour. Since this was your second baking I am assuming that your starter is 2 weeks plus old. Are you getting bubbles on top?

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: lara916
Replied on: Feb 05 2009 7:23:54 PM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by willowtreecreek

Lara if her bubbles are still there you are probably okay. High heat will kill the natural yeast which is why you don't want to get it too warm. If you are getting bubbles after feeding her you should be good to go. Mine seems to have a mind of its own, small bubbles one day, big the next, hooch on some days and then not on others. Just stick with her! Near the stove is okay but if you are baking you probably want to move her away for a little while.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com




Okay good, thanks so much ladies!

Lara #327

"Boots" Becker Homestead Farmgirls


Reply author: whimseyc
Replied on: Feb 06 2009 04:47:02 AM
Message:

"In our most recent MaryJanesFarm Feb/March magazine (themed Simply Bee), we tell you how to make no-knead artisan bread the MaryJane way! If you don't have your magazine yet, click here for the article, complete with recipes and things like where to purchase organic flour, etc."

OK gals, after a false start and throwing my original starter away, I now am not worrying about the watery substance on top each morning. But...my starter seems to get thinner each day - is that the way it's supposed to be? It's about the consistency of thin pancake batter now (6th day).



Sometimes you just have to take the leap, and build your wings on the way down.


Reply author: sunflowercritters
Replied on: Feb 06 2009 05:00:28 AM
Message:

Hi Julie kind of flour I use arrowhead mill organic unbleach white flour and dish I used ceramic and second time around using glass. House is about 68-70. now today taking care of my "mother" she has no bubbles on top . but I'm going to keep trying. My husband loves the taste but sure doesn't look nice and pretty to serve.
Vickie yours looks so yummy! I'm just like you Melissa I could use it for a door stopper or the kids in are neigbhor could use it for ice hockey Hope to have my bread like you ladies. I will be back on Sunday. going dog racing with my husband

Worry ends Where Faith in God begins.


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 06 2009 05:52:34 AM
Message:

Jill it WILL get thinner as time goes on. Mine was really "doughy" at the beginning and is now more like a pancake batter. This is normal.

I'm not sure Debra. MaryJane mntioned some flours (even Organic ones) did not work well. Perhaps this is one of them. Check it about an hour after you feed it to see if you have bubbles then. Have fun at the races. Are you going to Scarborough? Were going to the horse races this weekend.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: sunflowercritters
Replied on: Feb 06 2009 06:53:54 AM
Message:

Hi Julie
I quess when I get back from dog sled racing in farmington I should pick up or use just white flour that I get at Sam's club. I will let you know how it turns out. Have fun at the horse races. Do you or your husband race?
Have fun and I'm not giving up on this sour dough, I will keep on keeping on.
Have a great week-end all.

Worry ends Where Faith in God begins.


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 06 2009 07:13:35 AM
Message:

Debra as a Farmgirl Sisterhood member you can get up to 5, 5# bags of MaryJanes flour right now as the February Sisterhood special. You should have gotten an email. Let me know if you didn't and I can forward it to you. I have been using MaryJanes flour along with the King Arthur flours and it is my favorite of the three.

No we just watch the horse races.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: urban farm girl
Replied on: Feb 06 2009 07:27:41 AM
Message:

Ok I've kept my starter and added to it this morning and checked it and it has small bubbles. I'm doing the ceramic bowl and basically everything as according to the magazine. I keep the starter on top of the fridge its warmer up there . The flour is organic and unbleached.


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Feb 06 2009 07:38:33 AM
Message:

Melissa- is there lots of tiny bubbles or just a few? Mine is only producing tiny bubbles right now but there are a lot of them.

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: urban farm girl
Replied on: Feb 06 2009 07:42:59 AM
Message:

Alee - there is just a few small bubbles and the batter is lumpy, normally I smash the lumps, this time I didn't.


Reply author: ruralfarmgirl
Replied on: Feb 06 2009 07:58:29 AM
Message:

http://www.faqs.org/faqs/food/sourdough/starters/

This is an article that I like about the "science" of sourdough... and it is a science, you will need to find flour, pure water source that work well for you and your area... If we had a taster test of Melissa's, and Julie's, Deb's, Jill’s, alee's, Lara's and mine... they would all be different even though we used the same ingredience.... This is a GREAT science lesson.............I haven’t had any issues with the bread
MaryJanes Way, but we live close by and the climate is similar etc. Ceramic or glass bowls/jars work best to get the starter started and WOODEN SPOONS... metal can kill any starter... Water source is HUGE.........if you are using a source that has chlorine (in any amount) it will kill your starter (by the way, chlorine will kill the good bacteria in your body as well... just a thought)........I recently read that some water that has been in plastic containers could leach chemicals that would kill starter as well... They recommended, re-boiling the water.......letting it air stand to cool and then placing it into a glass jar to use while feeding the starter...

Dont you just love Science?


Rene~Prosser Farmgirl #185
http://farmchicksfarm.blogspot.com/


Circumstances made us FRIENDS; MaryJane's has made us SISTERS :)


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 06 2009 08:12:51 AM
Message:

Also keep in mind that if you have highly chlorinated water and you are using it rather than the purified water to wet the towel you are covering your starter with this COULD cause some issues. My tap water has relativly low chlorine levels so I haven't had any issues. If you are concerned but don't want to use bottled water to wet your cloth fill a bowl with tap water and let it sit out at least 24 hours. If you have a sunny spot this is even better. The chlorine levels will lower somewhat (but not completely) as some evaporation takes place.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: urban farm girl
Replied on: Feb 06 2009 08:15:25 AM
Message:

Rene', I basicaally went to Whole Foods and bought Arrowhead organic flour and used the ceramic bowl and of course wooden spoon and use distilled water. When I first started the starter I put the plate on, duh, and reread the article and it doesn't take much to confuse me. Well any way after a few days I was on the right track. It smelled sour and after the first week I made the bread and it never did rise and I baked it any way and it was a brick. This week same thing didn't rise and another brick. Your right this is definately a science project. I'm not going to give up though.


Reply author: lara916
Replied on: Feb 06 2009 09:16:57 AM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by prosserfarmgirl

http://www.faqs.org/faqs/food/sourdough/starters/

This is an article that I like about the "science" of sourdough... and it is a science, you will need to find flour, pure water source that work well for you and your area... If we had a taster test of Melissa's, and Julie's, Deb's, Jill’s, alee's, Lara's and mine... they would all be different even though we used the same ingredience.... This is a GREAT science lesson.............I haven’t had any issues with the bread
MaryJanes Way, but we live close by and the climate is similar etc. Ceramic or glass bowls/jars work best to get the starter started and WOODEN SPOONS... metal can kill any starter... Water source is HUGE.........if you are using a source that has chlorine (in any amount) it will kill your starter (by the way, chlorine will kill the good bacteria in your body as well... just a thought)........I recently read that some water that has been in plastic containers could leach chemicals that would kill starter as well... They recommended, re-boiling the water.......letting it air stand to cool and then placing it into a glass jar to use while feeding the starter...

Dont you just love Science?


Rene~Prosser Farmgirl #185
http://farmchicksfarm.blogspot.com/


Circumstances made us FRIENDS; MaryJane's has made us SISTERS :)



Thanks for posting this link Rene you rock!

Lara #327

"Boots" Becker Homestead Farmgirls


Reply author: urban farm girl
Replied on: Feb 06 2009 10:30:56 AM
Message:

Hey my starter is really looking good and I'm definately having a good feeling about it. Yeah Rene' your link is sooo cool, wish I lived near you. I love all the stuff you all are doing, right up my alley. thanks for sharing.


Reply author: chicken necker
Replied on: Feb 06 2009 10:37:43 AM
Message:

I am so excited! I read the magazine as soon as I got it in the mail, and loved the thought of making my own bread, but I kinda put it on the bottom of the list of to-do's. Then I saw MaryJane's Sisterhood special on the flour and of course I just couldn't pass that up.
Now that my order is on it's way, I logged on this morning to see what you ladies had going on with advice. Holey moley! Since I've never made bread before, I decided to start with page one. Now that I've finished reading each and every post, checking everyone's blogs and pictures, I've rediscovered a couple of things...
1. Having all these wonderful sisters willing to share advice gives me the confidence to tackle anything.
2. If you are going to read that much while sitting at the computer, make sure you don't sit indian style for the entire time. Your lower half will go completely numb and the trip to the bathroom will be much more difficult.
3. I love MaryJane and all her wonderful helpers! My daughters can roll their eyes and tease me about being a member of the MaryJane cult all they want. If my first batch comes out too dense and brick like, I'll just threaten to brain dust them with it!

FarmGirl Sister #123

Crafty Bay FarmGirls Chapter

"Whether you think you can or think you can't, either way, you're right." Henry Ford


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 06 2009 10:46:13 AM
Message:

HAHAH Sherry! I hate when my legs fall asleep! So glad you are joining us in this adventure. I look forward to your contributions on this forum!

Melissa - I am glad you are feeling better about it!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: gardenmaam
Replied on: Feb 06 2009 11:00:27 AM
Message:

Julie - thanks so much for the info on the hooch that gathers on top.
Helps to know it is OK. 3 more days till get to try 2nd loaf!! YAY


Reply author: urban farm girl
Replied on: Feb 06 2009 12:02:25 PM
Message:

thanks Julie and this weekend my dh said we'll get the cast iron pot oh yeah!! Sherry my daughter called me a dork about this hey Whatever!! I absolutely love this whole thing. A few years ago I bought MJ's book and man she is my mentor. I just wished I would have joined the farm chat along time ago.


Reply author: Quintessential Kate
Replied on: Feb 06 2009 12:08:15 PM
Message:

Greetings to all you new farmgals......this is a wonderful place!!!

Great article Rene'....thanks!

Ciao, Kate

Heart of Texas
Chapter
AKA: Hot Farmgirl #234
http://quintessentialkate.blogspot.com

Today is my best day!


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 06 2009 1:55:11 PM
Message:

I am trying a pizza dough recipe as we speak! If it is a success I will post it, along with pictures later tonight or in the AM!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Quintessential Kate
Replied on: Feb 06 2009 4:22:50 PM
Message:

I'm getting ready to mix up the sourdough waffle recipe......it needs to sit at room temp for @ 14 hours. I KNOW they are going to be great! I found several more recipes, and once I have tried them I will post them.
Have a wonderful weekend all you beautiful FarmGals!!!
Ciao, Kate

Heart of Texas
Chapter
AKA: Hot Farmgirl #234
http://quintessentialkate.blogspot.com

Today is my best day!


Reply author: urban farm girl
Replied on: Feb 06 2009 4:47:53 PM
Message:

Thanks for the welcome Kate and good luck on your waffles and you too have a great weekend.
Also do you have to wait a week to use the starter in a recipe such as Kates for the waffles or Julie's for the pizza?


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 06 2009 6:35:50 PM
Message:

Hi Girls! I made the pizza for dinner tonight and we LOVED it. I made two batches and had two pizzas. One crust was made with my MaryJanes Farm Flour starter and flour. The other was made using my King Arthur All Purpose Flour and starter. Both baked up beautifully with a fairly thin bottom crust that was just the right amount of chew and crunch. The flavor was great as well. Not overwhelmingly sour.

Sourdough Pizza Crust
Makes 1 Large Pizza
1 1/2 c. Sourdough Starter
2 Tbs. olive oil
1 tsp. kosher salt
1 1/2 c. flour
Preheat oven to 500. In an 8 cup measure or mixing bowl combine starter, olive oil, salt, and flour. Use a wooden spoon to combine until it blends and forms a ball. If the dough is to wet, add more flour, if it is too dry, add more starter. Allow the dough to rest about 30 minutes. Do not expect the dough to rise much during this time. Roll out the dough on a lightly floured surface with a rolling pin and transfer to a pizza stone or baking sheet. Pre-bake the crust 5-7 minutes, then remove from the oven. Before adding toppings, brush the crust with a little bit of olive oil. Top pizza as desired and bake until the crust is golden and the cheese has melted.









Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Buffalomary
Replied on: Feb 06 2009 6:40:51 PM
Message:

Hey Julie,
I did not get the email with any offers for the flour. Would you kindly send one my way?

Thank you!!

Buffalomary
Farmgirl Sister #293

You can take the farmer's daughter off the farm but you can't take the farm out of the farmer's daughter!!

Please visit me at my blog: http://buffalomaryscorner.blogspot.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 06 2009 8:03:43 PM
Message:

Mary I just emailed you. Let me know if you don't get it.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: kristin sherrill
Replied on: Feb 06 2009 8:36:38 PM
Message:

Julie, i have never gotten e-mails about anything. I would love to know about the flour special, too.

Kris

Turn your face to the sun and the shadows fall behind you. Maori proverb


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 07 2009 05:48:26 AM
Message:

Kristin, I emailed you too. Let me know if you don't get it.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: chicken necker
Replied on: Feb 07 2009 07:07:46 AM
Message:

Oh Julie! Those pizzas look to die for! I'll definitely have my girls support if I can make those.
Thanks for sharing!

FarmGirl Sister #123

Crafty Bay FarmGirls Chapter

"Whether you think you can or think you can't, either way, you're right." Henry Ford


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 07 2009 07:27:13 AM
Message:

Thanks Sherry. I forgot to mention that I precioked the onions just slightly before baking so they weren't raw. The rectangle pizza had ground beef, bacon, hot Italian sausage, red onion and pineapple. The round pizza was bacon, mushrooms and onions. I used a combo of shredded prepackaged mozzerella and fresh mozzerella. Of course the fresh was way better but a little to pricy for me to use alone on the whole pizza. I like lots of cheese.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: kristin sherrill
Replied on: Feb 07 2009 07:35:38 AM
Message:

Julie, thank you for the e-mail. And now for another question. I just made another loaf this morning of the bread. Can I still take some starter out to make pizza today, too? I have a double batch going of the starter. If I can, do I add three x's the flour and water tomorrow?

That pizza looks too good to pass up.

Kris

Turn your face to the sun and the shadows fall behind you. Maori proverb


Reply author: urban farm girl
Replied on: Feb 07 2009 07:48:30 AM
Message:

Wow Julie those pizza's are fantastic! Can I use the starter anytime for a recipe? This morning mine looked bubbly still then I fed it. Wet the towel and hopefully stays bubbly right?


Reply author: ruralfarmgirl
Replied on: Feb 07 2009 08:33:39 AM
Message:

Julie, the pizza's look awesome!

Melissa, I am glad that you are finding success. It truly is a science, sometimes you just have to find the right combination of flour and climate. It is one one of the things I love about getting the flour from the farm, we know that it is fresh and high quality, I can make all the differnece.

Rene~Prosser Farmgirl #185
http://farmchicksfarm.blogspot.com/


Circumstances made us FRIENDS; MaryJane's has made us SISTERS :)


Reply author: khartquilt
Replied on: Feb 07 2009 08:42:08 AM
Message:

So, I am making my first loaf today. But I think I added too much four. My husband started asking my question as I was adding the flour. I was using a 1/2 cup measures. My dough is no way close to sticky. I placed it in the pot. (which is way too big) And I will just pray for the best.
I hope it comes out ok.
I will post photos this evening if I have time.


Kathy H
Farmgirl Sister #81
"To the world you may be one person, but to one person you may be the world..." (anomymous)
http://khartquilt.blogspot.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 07 2009 09:26:48 AM
Message:

Melissa - My baking day is Sunday and I made the pizzas last night(Friday). I fed my starter right after I removed the 1 1/2 cups needed for the dough and gave it a double feeding. I will give it a double feeding again tonight.(I feed mine at night. I'm not much of a morning person!) It looks like I will still have pleanty to do a baking tomorrow.

Also - the bubbles will get less as the day goes on. It will be most active in the hours just after feeding.

Kristin - as long as you have enough starter left and enough to make the dough you should be fine. If today is your rest day you may just want to add a little extra when you feed the next couple of days to make up for the difference.

Kathy - not sure if the extra flour will be a problem or not. I'll cross my fingers for you! Cant wait to see pictures!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: khartquilt
Replied on: Feb 07 2009 11:49:20 AM
Message:

Ok, I am back (the kitchen floor is drying. Just mopped it)
1) My "mothers" home.
I keep it in a large bowl with the cotton towel as instructed. But I added the wide elastic band to keep the towel from falling off.

2) Just before I removed my first two cups.
I have been getting a rather heavy skin on top. I started to dampen the cloth each day once in the morning and them at night when I got home from work. Our house is very dry. Forced hot air heating.

3) Removed two cups. Added some honey and salt. Then added the flour. I think I added 1/2 cup too much. Not very sticky...


Well what do you all think??
I now have it in a 5 quart cast iron Dutch oven. I could not find anything smaller with out porcelain. Would that have been ok to bake it in? The porcelain?
The roaster is in my microwave. It tends to be warm in there if I keep the hood light on. I also added two coffee mugs with boiling water. I hope I am not messing this up.
To be honest, I did take a quick peek. It is looking a lot better. It has risen a little.
My fingers are crossed.


Kathy H
Farmgirl Sister #81
"To the world you may be one person, but to one person you may be the world..." (anomymous)
http://khartquilt.blogspot.com


Reply author: olive610
Replied on: Feb 07 2009 12:11:27 PM
Message:

Well week 2 is over with and I have my second loaf rising. Week one sat there like a brick and never rose.

Loaf number 2 was mixed up this morning early. I set it in my oven with the lid cocked to let it breathe and rise. I checked on it about 11 AM and was shocked. There was dough all over the floor of my oven and cascading down the sides of my cast iron pot. Holy Moly what happened. I pulled it out, cleaned up the oven and this time set it on a cookie sheet to catch the spills.

Hubby and I had to run out to get some errands done. We just got home and I was anxious to check my rise again after another 2 and 1/2 hours of rising time. It was about to blow the lid off the pan again. So there is definitely not a problem with the rise at the end of week 2.

Has anybody else had this happen? I am curious about how this loaf is going to bake up. It is going to be full of air holes? We will just have to wait and see. Oh BTW, hubby thinks this is a riot! You should have seen him when I opened the oven and discovered the dough all over the place. He did help me clean it up.......nice guy! He probably figured if he didn't, he wouldn't get any of it.

The squirrels and the birds are enjoying my brick-like loaf from last week. They thinks it's the bee's knees!

I will report back and let you all know how this turned out. I have to charge up my camera so that I can take a picture of it.

"Life is a great big canvas, and you should throw all the paint on it you can." Danny Kaye


Reply author: lara916
Replied on: Feb 07 2009 12:18:09 PM
Message:

How do I go about doubling the size of my mother? anyone know?

Thanks~

Lara #327

"Boots" Becker Homestead Farmgirls

eta: I just checked on my bread from this morning, it's been in a bowl to rise wince 5am this morning and it looks exactly the same, I am wondering if I did something wrong!


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 07 2009 12:51:07 PM
Message:

Lara - is this your first time to bake with it? Most girls were having little to no rise the first week. It seems the starter likes to mature a liitle more. If you wish to dough me your starter add 2/3 cup flour and 1/2 cup of water everyday. This will yield enough for two loaves or give you extra to pass to a friend.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: lara916
Replied on: Feb 07 2009 1:11:59 PM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by willowtreecreek

Lara - is this your first time to bake with it? Most girls were having little to no rise the first week. It seems the starter likes to mature a liitle more. If you wish to dough me your starter add 2/3 cup flour and 1/2 cup of water everyday. This will yield enough for two loaves or give you extra to pass to a friend.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com




It is my first week! Thanks for the tips and have a great weekend!

Warmly, Lara


Lara #327

"Boots" Becker Homestead Farmgirls


Reply author: lara916
Replied on: Feb 07 2009 2:33:01 PM
Message:

Here's my first attempt:









It wasn't quite cooked all the way-it was still great though!


p.s sorry I am unsure why those first two shots are soo big!





Lara #327

"Boots" Becker Homestead Farmgirls


Reply author: Pearlsnjeans
Replied on: Feb 07 2009 4:05:09 PM
Message:

Wow - miss a few days on this forum and there are so many message to catch up with. Julie the pizza looks wonderful! Makes me hungry! I tried baking my bread in a loaf pan this morning so I could make sandwichs like MaryJane. It had a good rise, tastes great, but like the two small loaves from last week, still seems too done on the top. I know sourdough bread is supposed to be crusty, but mine is hard! What can I do different?

Vicki
Farmgirl Sister #120
Today well lived makes every yesterday a memory of happiness and every tomorrow a vision of hope.


Reply author: kristin sherrill
Replied on: Feb 07 2009 5:19:19 PM
Message:

Well, I have to say my pizza was so good. My hubby says thank you, Julie. I had dehydrated tomatoes and mushrooms that I used in place of sauce and I used our sausage. Cooked the sausage and sauteed onions with the mushrooms. I used a small cookie sheet. So I put the tomatoes (after rehydrating them)and then sausage, then the onions and mushrooms, then lots of cheese. It was so good! And not hard or time consuming at all. But it was alot for 2 people, so next time I will cut the recipe in half or wait till the kids come to eat. I did take pictures but again will have to get my DD to help.

And for my bread this time I added 1/2 a cup of whole wheat flour and made 2 small loaves in my small cast iron skillets. It rose all day and never really did much. But the flavor is great. Very sour.

And Vicki, try putting tin foil on top the last 10 or so minutes to keep from browning too much. I had to do that, too.

Turn your face to the sun and the shadows fall behind you. Maori proverb


Reply author: olive610
Replied on: Feb 07 2009 5:37:41 PM
Message:

My loaf from week 2 turned out okay. On page 33 of this topic I posted my "I Love Lucy" rising fiasco today and I wasn't sure how this would turn out. I was very pleased with the end results and it was delicious.

The texture was wonderful and it was not too sour. I had read where quite a few people thought it was too sour. I did increase the honey up to 1 Tablespoon. I baked mine in a 2 quart cast iron pot.

Here are some photos.







"Life is a great big canvas, and you should throw all the paint on it you can." Danny Kaye


Reply author: khartquilt
Replied on: Feb 07 2009 5:51:52 PM
Message:

Well I baked my first loaf. We too had a lot of things to do today. I did not get it into the oven until 7pm.
It did not rise too much. But it did raise some.



I cooked it for 20 minutes. It felt rather firm. So I took it out. It did not brown too much. And it did not rise much more then what it had before I put it in the over. Oh and I used 2 muffin tins with water.




When I cut it open, it was still a little raw or doughy. But it was good. I just had some with butter. I think tomorrow I will try toasting a slice and have a little honey or jam on it.



I am letting it cool all the way. I will place it in a brown bag.
I know next week it will be even better.
Thanks for taking some time to read my thoughts and look at my photos.



Kathy H
Farmgirl Sister #81
"To the world you may be one person, but to one person you may be the world..." (anomymous)
http://khartquilt.blogspot.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 07 2009 7:10:54 PM
Message:

Kathy and Mary-Alice those look yummy! I am really enjoying all the pictures.

Kristin - glad your hubby and you enjoyed the pizza. My favorite part was how easy the dough was! I mixed mine up and began prepping my other ingredients and by the time I was done my dough had rested 30 minutes! My hubby is a big eater so one would feed the two of us! I had made two because I was trying to compare taste and texture between the two types of flour. Plus my MIL had come to eat with us. We have leftovers which we will take for lunch on Monday.

Vicki - It sounds like your oven might be running a little hot. Try kicking the temp down a little (25 degrees should do the trick)and using a thermometer to check the internal temp of your bread. With the lower temp you may need to cook it a little longer. You are right it should have a crust but should not be HARD on top. Let me know if this works for you.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: kristin sherrill
Replied on: Feb 07 2009 7:31:17 PM
Message:

Julie, the crust around the edges was very crispy and that got me to thinking about making sour dough crackers. I might try the same pizza dough and just roll it out real thin and make crackers next time. Something to think about, huh?

Kris

Turn your face to the sun and the shadows fall behind you. Maori proverb


Reply author: olive610
Replied on: Feb 07 2009 7:33:03 PM
Message:

Julie, Thanks. BTW, I loved your pics of your pizzas too. They looked very professional and perfect. I am going to have to try the pizza too.

I can't wait for the next bread baking. I think I am going to try being a little inventive and see if I can come up with a good raisin bread.

This was really a fun day today.

"Life is a great big canvas, and you should throw all the paint on it you can." Danny Kaye


Reply author: gramax18
Replied on: Feb 07 2009 9:30:11 PM
Message:

I was gone for a week and put the mother in the refrig. When I got home last night I added the flour and water. This morning I mixed up the white bread and it really rose nicely. This is my 3rd week to bake and it did much better.
My dough is not sticky even if there is not the full amount of flour it. But I like the way it is.
This has really been a lot of fun and I have learned a lot about bread baking even though I've been doing it for 50 years +. It is good to see all the gals that are tring bread for the first time. KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK.


Reply author: whimseyc
Replied on: Feb 08 2009 03:40:55 AM
Message:

[quote]Originally posted by willowtreecreek

Jill it WILL get thinner as time goes on. Mine was really "doughy" at the beginning and is now more like a pancake batter. This is normal.

Thanks for the info. I baked a loaf with walnuts and dried cherries last night. I did knead it for a few minutes and then put it on a cookie sheet on parchment paper. It's pretty heavy but done inside and maybe edible LOL I'm thinking about cutting it up into slices since it's so thin and baking them again kind of like biscotti. We'll see what happens next week - I'm not giving up!

Sometimes you just have to take the leap, and build your wings on the way down.


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 08 2009 09:26:10 AM
Message:

Jill what a great idea about biscotti! Making a sweeter bread and cooking it free form that slicing and rebaking would make great biscotti!

Kristin I think crackers would be very doable with that pizza dough recipe. You may want to poke some little holes in them with the tines of a fork to keep them from puffing up. One of my pizza doughs got a big bubble in it during the pre-bake but I just poked a little hole and it went back down. I'm looking forward to having that last piece of pizza for lunch tomorrow!

Yesterday we had the sourdough waffles again. They were so yummy! Real crispy on the outside with great cell wall structure on the inside. Probably the BEST waffles I have ever had.

I'm gonna bake a loaf of bread or two a little later today. With three starters going I am really busy with sourdough!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: jpbluesky
Replied on: Feb 08 2009 09:37:39 AM
Message:

I am really enjoying all the pictures of your breads, too. My daughter and I had a discussion yesterday about exactly what constitutes a ceramic bowl. We have some glass bowls from the 60's that are large, and wondered if that was alright for the mother to live in. Our ceramic, vintage bowls....they seem too old and I have heard that some of them have mercury in the paints....anyway, do you think a pyrex type big glass bowl from the 60's will work?

Yummy breads here! Makes me hungry.

Farmgirl Sister # 31

www.blueskyjeannie.blogspot.com

Psalm 51: 10-13


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 08 2009 10:42:58 AM
Message:

I think MaryJane suggested ceramic because she want us NOT to use metal (bad for the starter) or plastic (may leech chemicals). She will have to correct me if I am wrong but I think glass would be okay. I know nothing about glass from the 60's!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: chessie
Replied on: Feb 08 2009 11:40:49 AM
Message:

Sourdough Success! I am so excited. Used my new cast iron bread pan lined with parchment and let it rise overnight in oven with the light on, about 10 hours. Baked it for 20 mins and used thermometer. Ultimately it took another 20 minutes to reach 190 degrees- for a total of 40 minutes. I rubbed butter on top crust as it rested. We had half of it for breakfast with scrambled eggs. The Best! I am so, so proud. Thank you MaryJane.






www.edgehillherbfarm.com "where the name is bigger than the farm, but no one seems to mind"
blog http://edgehillherbfarmer.spaces.live.com/default.aspx?wa=wsignin1.0
happy farmgirl #89


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 08 2009 2:24:29 PM
Message:

Looks Yummy Karen! I LOVE that blue and white plate!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: LoraFLeming
Replied on: Feb 08 2009 5:49:39 PM
Message:

Well ... I tried the sourdough and bake the first two loaves yesterday ... go to my blog to see the pics and results of my first attempt ...
http://loralynn7.blogspot.com/


Reply author: gardenmaam
Replied on: Feb 08 2009 5:50:54 PM
Message:

Hi Karen - nice looking loaf! And I agree with some elses comment- sweet blue plate ;^)
Kathy H - yours looks much like my loaf looked.
It is really nice to see the pics of everyones bread. Very helpful. My first one was in a cast iron round pan...although I confess overbaked mine first time. Tomorrow I think I will try a glass loaf pan and see what happens. I will be more mindful of baking time than I was before. Hoping we get a great loaf for sandwiches.
Thanks Ladies!


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 08 2009 6:51:05 PM
Message:

Hi lora. This was a common experience with everyone during the first week. Keep at it and I promise you will see better results next week.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: antoinette
Replied on: Feb 08 2009 7:34:49 PM
Message:

Hi Everyone,
I finished my bread on Saturday, my husband said I am only eating it because I went
to the trouble of making it. It wasn't much trouble making and it did look like the
picture but it was a little flat. I am going to try again also. One of the other girls
had written about using spelt flour does anyone know if that will work or should I just
experiment. Does anyone know the calorie content of this bread? Also does anyone know
where I can get cookie or cake recipes make WITHOUT white sugar or white flour?
Thanks for any info. Toni


Reply author: Gaelic Gardener
Replied on: Feb 09 2009 05:43:25 AM
Message:

I started my mother yesterday -- but even 2 hours after adding the water and flour this morning (2nd day) I've got no bubbles. It's just a thick dough-like consistency. Is it too soon to be worried? I'm using Whole Foods 365 Organic flour (no organic KA anywhere) and for the water I got gallon jugs from the babyfood aisle -- they say "purified" so I'm assuming it's OK. I don't have any ceramic bowls big enough so I'm using a Pyrex bowl -- and a bamboo spoon. I live in New England and it's a nasty winter. Heating oil is $2 a gallon so the heat stays at 60 degrees in my house. My kitchen counter is bisected by the chimney and does have some radiant heat from the furnace so I've snuggled the bowl up against it. Should I leave the towel off for a bit? This is all a big adventure for me and I'm probably going to be really anxious and anal until I get a good loaf from it. I don't usually bake -- the precision of it gives me agita. I'm a dumper -- I love recipes where I just have to dump this or that and get good results -- my favorite dump recipe is Hawaiian Wedding Cake -- if you want the recipe let me know -- deelish! And my mom never baked anything that didn't come as a "kit" in a box. And my grandmother's specialties were Shepherd's Pie and American Chop Suey which should give you an idea of my culinary genes. And the most hilarious part of this whole venture is... I don't even really eat bread. I like it, but I try to limit my carb intake to whole grains. Plus I've had Lap Band surgery for weight loss and bread doesn't go down the gullet so well. But I was so inspired by the magazine (my first MJF experience)that I had to try it! I've read all 35 pages of this post and the discussion has been great. I must say, I never thought I'd find so many women hoping for yeast!
Good Bread Luck Everyone!
--Kelly


Reply author: sunflowercritters
Replied on: Feb 09 2009 06:56:42 AM
Message:

Hi all I'm back from dog sled racing. Had a great week end with my humby. When I got back on Sunday, my mother didn't look good. So I'm starting new batch of sourdough starter today, trying different flour. Hope mine will come out this time. (Getting kind of down on this) But not going to give up.. Julie your pizza crust looks so...good. Great Job!


Worry ends Where Faith in God begins.


Reply author: ennoid
Replied on: Feb 09 2009 07:24:21 AM
Message:

Last week, my bread was awful so I began a new mother. This week my loaf was great! It had a nice rise to it and we devoured most of it last night (sorry...no picture). I used the same cast iron 2-Quart casserole dish (picture on page 9) but was out of parchment paper to line it. I must say, I liked the results so much better without the parchment paper. I buttered my dish instead. The bottom and sides were nice and soft, while the top was hard and crusty. It was so much easier to cut by flipping it upside-down and slicing from the soft bottom.

Also, I wasn't getting much of a rise since the cast iron got cold. After three hours, I moved it beside my warm Crockpot and it poofed right up by the 8th hour. It was a little too sour, but I drizzled honey over mine. I think someone else mention previously that the longer the bread rises, the more sour it is. Next week I'll try to shorten the rise time or maybe try the cinnamon raisin recipe.


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 09 2009 07:51:58 AM
Message:

Kelly - I wouldn't be too worried. Keep feeding it daily. It will be thinner and more active by the end of the week. I would also suggest that you use your starter for pancakes or waffles this week and wait an extra week before making the bread. That will give the starter plenty of time to develop and you wont be disappointed with the results.

Debra - What do you mean by "it didn't look good"?

I think some of you guys are jumping the gun on starting new mothers and not really allowing them time to develop. Sourdough starters take time to develop natural yeast and bacteria. The performance and flavor increase with time. Unless you are seeing MOLD you should be fine to keep using it. If left to sit a day or two the liquid (hooch) will seperate out on the top. Sometimes it can look a little like dirty water. As long it is not black, red, or green it is fine to mix back in. One or two feedings and your starter will be happy and back to her old self!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: gramadinah
Replied on: Feb 09 2009 08:17:52 AM
Message:

I have baked for the third time and still haven't gotten the loaf of bread I think should have The flavor is great it has begun to rise but still not in a loaf type shape. It did rise to double but still was only 2 inches tall. I am going to keep trying. The cast iron pan was key as it was warm and the rise was good. I still will feed and care for mom and try to find a cast iron loaf pan.

Diana



Farmgirl Sister #273


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 09 2009 08:26:54 AM
Message:

Diana the loaf is going to fit to the pan it is in. If your pan is too large it will spread more than rise. the pan MaryJane uses in the article is taller than it is wider because it is a cast iron saucepan. I am using a dutch oven which is wider than it is tall so my finished loaf is only about 3 inches tall.

I am wondering if anyone has tried a coffee can lined with parchement paper. I was thinging about trying this but don't ahve any coffee cans. I think the round bread would be great for sandwiches. I'm gonna check with the cafeteria ladies at my school and see if I can scrounge up a coffee can.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: olive610
Replied on: Feb 09 2009 09:19:40 AM
Message:

Kelly, I am also using the Whole Foods 365 Organic flour. The first week I didn't get a good rise. This week my second loaf was wonderful. Give it a chance and see what happens. I would think that if you have the bowl nestled against the warm chimney you will get some radiant heat from that. I would definitely keep the towel on it to keep the drafts away from it since you are keeping your house very cool. The Pyrex glass bowl should be fine too as well as the bamboo spoon. Good luck





"Life is a great big canvas, and you should throw all the paint on it you can." Danny Kaye


Reply author: Carrie M
Replied on: Feb 09 2009 11:14:20 AM
Message:

My starter is now three weeks old and I have baked from it several times. I add a couple cups of flour and water at each feeding so that I cam bake more often. I have noticed that the rises are getting much better and my first "no knead" bread came out very well. I still prefer to knead because I just like doing it and need the exercise, but the no knead was fun to do, too.

I accidentally left my starter on the stove top and my daughter did some baking. Now my starter smells awful sour and I don't like the stronger flavor. So...today I used up all but two cups and am starting over with that. I'm hoping to work out the extra sour by over feeding for a couple days. I'll keep you posted.

Can't wait to bake today's bread...made one with molasses and some quick oats!

CArrie M

www.totallykadeshfarm.blogspot.com

Farmgirl Sisterhood #147

Tis better to weep at joy than to joy at weeping--Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 09 2009 1:03:49 PM
Message:

Carrie - if you make up any new recipes, Be sure to post them!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: kristin sherrill
Replied on: Feb 09 2009 1:10:01 PM
Message:

Yes, please do. I'd like to know how you did the molasses and oats bread. Thanks.

Kris

Turn your face to the sun and the shadows fall behind you. Maori proverb


Reply author: gardenmaam
Replied on: Feb 09 2009 4:18:39 PM
Message:

Well, hello girls .... My second attempt turned out pretty good! I used the glass loaf pan with parchment paper in it; buttered. It rose overnight. This morning I put it under the under cabinet halogen lights where it is warmer and it rose a bit better there. About mid-morning today I baked it at 400 for hmmmmm....not sure how long....maybe 35 mins? It is quite tasty! It reminds me of a cross between english muffin bread and sourdough. We'll have it with dinner tonight. Having breakfast for dinner and will toast it. I am pleased with todays bread..YAY!
Oh--two things....
Any suggestions for keeping the top from getting very crunchy?
Thought about putting foil on it after it bakes a little for the remainder of the baking time but not sure if that would work. Anyone tried that?

Next week I think I will make two or three mini round loaves and have them with clam chowder in them. Thought of that today. YUM
I just need to find very small round pans. OR maybe small sized glass pyrex bowls would work?? Am happy for anyones suggestions. Has anyone tried using the bread for a soup bowl? Want to bake in a container so they keep a good shape to use as a bowl. If I just put them on the baking sheet I am afraid they may spread out like my first attempt last week.
Cathy



Reply author: Gaelic Gardener
Replied on: Feb 09 2009 4:19:28 PM
Message:

Thanks all for the advice!
This may be a stupid question... can I ask why no one is using a loaf pan? Is it because you want a more rustic-looking loaf? Or is there a yeasty scientific reason for it? Could I use a loaf pan if I wanted?
thanks again,
Kelly


Reply author: sunflowercritters
Replied on: Feb 09 2009 4:45:02 PM
Message:

Hi Julie why I said it didn't look good is for couple of days no bubbles very flat.
shouldn't it have bubbles after a week and half?

Worry ends Where Faith in God begins.


Reply author: Ronna
Replied on: Feb 09 2009 5:24:00 PM
Message:

Julie, forget the coffee/tin can baking. It was done in decades past when people did not know about the solder holding the can together leaching and being toxic. Same with the old apple pie baked in a paper grocery bag..too much recycled matter to be safe.
You might come across one of glass Pyrex bread tubes in a thrift shop. They came with a metal stand to hold it. Trick with that is to grease it really well or the bread will stick like glue. Butter, which I know was instructed for greasing the bread pan, can cause sticking too. Best would be clarified butter, where it's melted and the solids have settled to the bottom. Use just the clear part.


Reply author: Ronna
Replied on: Feb 09 2009 5:30:18 PM
Message:

Cathy, you need a fairly stiff dough to make bread bowls. Otherwise, they will just slide into a "puddle". Best way to do bowls is to lay the dough over the outside of a bowl turned upside down and greased. Can do it in braids or lattice also for a decorative bowl (that won't hold soup, for sure). Not sure I'd even try this with sourdough, especially one without any yeast and not kneaded. Need a strong gluten structure for it to hold it's shape.
If soft top crust is desired, brush the loaf with butter as soon as it comes out of the oven. Sourdough has a thicker/crunchier crust than most breads, so it will soften just a bit.


Reply author: Quintessential Kate
Replied on: Feb 09 2009 5:32:16 PM
Message:

Kelly......yes, you can use a loaf pan. I used my glass pyrex loaf pan the other day and the bread turned out just fine. There is no "yeasty scientific reason" for the freeform loaves that some of the gals are making. One of our Farmgirl sisters found a castiron loaf pan...which I think is neat. She posted a pic of the loaf and it was beautiful! Gonna have to look for one.
Anyway....good luck with your bread.
I have to tell you......the "yeasty scientific reason" made me chuckle. You're funny!!! and I mean that in a "funny haha" kinda way.
Ciao, Kate


Heart of Texas
Chapter
AKA: Hot Farmgirl #234
http://quintessentialkate.blogspot.com

Today is my best day!


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 09 2009 5:43:37 PM
Message:

What a bummer about the coffee can. Thanks for that info Ronna.


Ronna/Cathy - I believe Cathy is talking about a round loaf of bread that once baked you cut out the middle and pour the soup in, rather than shaping the loaf like a bowl. Cathy I think you could do this because there is a restaurant around here that serves soup in sourdough bread bowls. (YUM) The trick would be keeping the loaf from spreading too much before you bake it. I am wondering if you would be able to make a small ring (like out of foil???) to place around the loaf while it rises to hold it in place but then remove the ring when you bake it??? MMMMmmm...I'll have to keep thinking.

Kelly - I think a loaf pan would be fine. You just want to make sure it is well greased or use parchment to keep it from sticking.


Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Ronna
Replied on: Feb 09 2009 5:53:32 PM
Message:

aha, yes, scooped out bread bowl...thanks for the memory jolt. Still will need a fairly stiff dough to be sturdy enough when baked to hold the soup or such. I worked at a restaurant in SoCalif years ago and we served beef stew in the small individual loaves of bread hollowed out. All bread was made with frozen Rhodes dough or mixes for the date nut loaves, but the customers thought it was wonderful. Owner had great ideas for serving low cost food in a way that high prices could be charged and it was very successful.


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 09 2009 6:01:36 PM
Message:

Ronna do you think she could try adding some extra flour to make the dough a little sturdier or is that going to change it's structure too much?

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Ronna
Replied on: Feb 09 2009 6:17:46 PM
Message:

Yes, more flour to make the dough thicker, but also would need some kneading to develop gluten too. Just adding more flour, the dough will take even longer to rise. I'd suggest that SF sourdough recipe I posted way back in this thread rather than the no knead no yeast "Bread the MaryJane Way".


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Feb 09 2009 9:39:39 PM
Message:

I made the French Bread recipe out of a sour dough book that Ronna sent me almost 2 years ago now! I forgot to put the water in and it made a nice hard crust. It would certainly have made great bread bowls if I had shaped them that way. The dough was sticky when I let it rise and had the most awesome interior structure. In fact I made two loaves and while I was gone for about 10 minutes getting my husband from work, the dog stole and ate half a loaf!

I will experiment in making bread bowls tomorrow. I will let you know how I fair!

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: Quintessential Kate
Replied on: Feb 10 2009 05:28:32 AM
Message:

Cathy,
I agree with Ronna. The No Knead MaryJane bread is WONDERFUL....and what a great opportunity she created for all of us to get together, yet once again. With that being said....Ronna's San Francisco Style Sourdough Bread would be PERFECT for your bread bowls. I have made it twice and it turns out perfect everytime. It really makes a big loaf, and I imagine you could get 4-6 nice size soup bowls. The crust is, well, crusty and crunchy and the bread in the middle is soft. Great combo for bowls. Oh, and it will hold it's "freeform"....no need for pans or molds or anything like that.
This is week 4 for my start......and due to the "conditions" here at my house, it has taken it I feel, longer to mature than a lot of the other gals. I have now been successful in making a MaryJane loaf...and am going to make another today, but prior to that, when everyone was turning out their first "doorstop loaves"....I KNEW mine wasn't ready for making it MJ's way just yet, so I made the San Francisco...which I think is on page 13 of this thread. I was sooo stoked about making a loaf of bread and didn't want to wait any longer.
Good luck with the bowls...and let us know how they turn out.
Ciao, Kate

Heart of Texas
Chapter
AKA: Hot Farmgirl #234
http://quintessentialkate.blogspot.com

Today is my best day!


Reply author: Quintessential Kate
Replied on: Feb 10 2009 05:35:04 AM
Message:

Alee,
I would LOVE Ronna's French Bread recipe....
Would you mind either posting it...or send it to me in an e-mail???

Thanks....and Ciao,
Kate

P.S.......Shame on the dog!! But I imagine he/she was thinking......"Wow, Mom left me a yummy treat....slobber, slobber, slobber!!!"

Heart of Texas
Chapter
AKA: Hot Farmgirl #234
http://quintessentialkate.blogspot.com

Today is my best day!


Reply author: farmmommy
Replied on: Feb 10 2009 06:37:21 AM
Message:

hey kate, I agree with you about the dog.....lol....anyhow, this is Kelley over in Quitman, I emailed ya!!! Thanks, Kelley


Reply author: ddmashayekhi
Replied on: Feb 10 2009 07:37:24 AM
Message:

My first attempt at the sourdough bread came out just fine, so I decided to make the sourdough cinnamon rolls next. They came out perfect and are delicious! I made them two days ago and they are still yummy!

Dawn in IL


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 10 2009 07:40:03 AM
Message:

Great Dawn! Glad to hear it!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Ronna
Replied on: Feb 10 2009 07:41:35 AM
Message:

The San Francisco Sourdough Bread recipe is at the bottom of page 13 of this thread. It's a Sunset magazine recipe, I can't take credit for anything but sharing it. For those having problems getting a good loaf with just starter or if you don't want quite so much sourdough flavor. Also if you don't have time to wait for dough to rise without added yeast. Not at all to take away from the original concept of Bread the MaryJane Way.


Reply author: mollybee
Replied on: Feb 10 2009 07:49:14 AM
Message:

Help!!! I followed the instructions using the organic flour and my bread came out hard and awful. This was my first attempt at home made bread and it was a disaster. My husband smiled and tried to be nice enough to eat it, he's sweet. I used the King Arthur's flour and well water. I can use some advice girls. Thanks..


Reply author: LoraFLeming
Replied on: Feb 10 2009 08:02:39 AM
Message:

I am so happy I found this site after picking up a couple of issues of the magazine in the grocery store! I have one suggestion though ... when you talk about someone else's photos etc could you list their website or at least the page # you got their link from? As this post grows it's going to be hard to go through them all to find one posting! When I read "so&so's bread turned out great and looks delish" I want to rush over and see it too! When I start looking through the posts for it, I get sidetracked and end up forgetting what I was looking for in the first place! LOL! I'm glad that I am not the only one who thinks making bread from scratch is still a worthwhile activity ... sometimes it feels that way! If you want to see my first batch and it's disastrous ... yet humorous ... finish, go to my blog! If nothing else, you'll feel superior to me or realize you're not the only one who's first batch failed, and I've been baking bread for 30 years! I think my mistake was covering it with the damp towel the first week ... I got the directions mixed up ... thought "damp first week, dry after that ... I'm using the dry towel now for week two and it already looks much bubblier! Can't wait for Sat ...again ... maybe I'll try a heart shape for V-day!? <3
http://loralynn7.blogspot.com/


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 10 2009 08:20:45 AM
Message:

JoAnn - you didn't do anything wrong. This was a common problem with everyone the first week. The issue is that the starter hasn't had enough time to mature. Give it another week or so and you will see GREAT results. In the meantime I would suggest you at least skim through the last 36 pages of this thread. You will find LOTS of great information. There are several recipes you might want to try that work great even with a young starter. The Pizza dough, waffles and pancakes are all wonderful. You could take that hard bread and turn it in to crutons. In another week or so your starter will be much better and ready for making bread. Your hubby will be glad to eat it!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: lara916
Replied on: Feb 10 2009 10:25:28 AM
Message:

I love reading everyone's Sourdough Adventures! This is a great thread

Lara #327

"Boots" Becker Homestead Farmgirls


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Feb 10 2009 10:56:47 AM
Message:

I found a recipe in the Sour Dough book that Ronna gave me for bread that bakes with a hollow center specifically for putting soups, chili and other things in. I will try it before sharing the recipe so I know if it works or not! On my way to the kitchen now!

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: campchic
Replied on: Feb 10 2009 12:04:10 PM
Message:

Do you think we can make "frenchbread" out of our mother? Has anyone tried this? Do you have to have any special "tools"?

Erin

Farmgirl #190
www.concrete-and-grace.blogspot.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 10 2009 3:59:56 PM
Message:

The recipe MaryJane has given us for the Farmhouse Bread is very similar to a traditional french bread recipe. I would suggest that you add a little more flour and that you knead it a little before forming your loaf if you want something more traditional in size and shape.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Feb 10 2009 4:55:54 PM
Message:

I made french bread yesterday with the starter and it was lovely! Absolutely perfect!

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: dmiller2003
Replied on: Feb 10 2009 5:48:24 PM
Message:

This is my first time to do a starter. Started last wed. and followed instructions and the starter was super thick. I never noticed bubbling and it doesn't look anything like the pics I saw of the other starters here. I started a new one today and it still seems a little thick. Could I be doing something wrong? I use well water and KA organic white flour, the brown and white package.


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 10 2009 6:05:22 PM
Message:

It will get thinner and more bubbly as time goes on. Give it time to work it's magic!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: gardenmaam
Replied on: Feb 10 2009 7:45:23 PM
Message:

Alee-Yes, you're right-it is a small round loaf I want to make to hollow out the inside and serve clam chowder in....individual size is what I am looking to do. Did you get to try the bowl/bread recipe?

Ronna-thanks for info on Sunset Mags SF Sourdough-saw recipe on pg. 13 of this topic (thanks) and will try that next week for the bread/bowl. I did butter my baked loaf when it got out of oven...but it was still quite a bit crunchy. After cooled - I put in plastic zip bag to keep moist and soft. I think it just may be the nature of this bread, huh? The Farmhouse recipe is what I've used.

Kelly - I have used a glass loaf pan; turning oven temp down 25 degrees. I used parchment paper and buttered it and it worked just great.


Reply author: kristin sherrill
Replied on: Feb 11 2009 07:30:23 AM
Message:

I just made crackers from the pizza dough recipe on page 32. I thought the dough would be great for crackers because it was so crispy. So I made some this morning. They are SO good and crispy and crunchy! The only thing wrong with them is I can't stop eating them. So we're having crackers for breakfast!

I just rolled them out really thin and I have a little flower pick thing that you stick flower stems in a vase to make them stand up. I just cut out the crackers and poked them with the flower thing, but you could use a fork. I put them in the top middle of the oven on 400 for about 8-10 minutes. I checked them in between. Cool on a wire rack and munch away! Very good. And since they have salt in the dough I didn't add any to the top, but I'm sure you could get creative and add other things to the dough.

Ya'll have got to try this. Super EASY!

I am also trying the riasin nut bread but I'm using dried cranberries, since I'm not a raisin lover. It's rising u[stairs under the sink in the cabinet with a lamp on. It's warm in there!

Happy baking day! Kris

Turn your face to the sun and the shadows fall behind you. Maori proverb


Reply author: shover1970
Replied on: Feb 11 2009 07:39:26 AM
Message:

I am making the starter for the first time and it is looking great. It is bubbly and smelling so good. i can't wait to make bread with it this weekend. I am loving it.


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 11 2009 07:40:40 AM
Message:

Kristin - I am glad the crackers worked out. I really thought they would. Keep us updated on how long they last without going stale. That is if you don't eat them all before then! HAHAH! Maybe you could set one aside for science!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 11 2009 07:43:39 AM
Message:

Tracy - please keep in mind that many of us had less than ideal results with the bread the first week. Don't get discouraged if your bread doesn't turn out like you expect this first week the starters seem to be taking more like two weeks to mature enough for making bread. If you are worried you might want to try the pancakes or waffles instead this weekend and wait another week on the bread.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Daisy
Replied on: Feb 11 2009 08:03:26 AM
Message:

This is week 3 of baking for me. My bread has worked fine each week, but it is way too sour. I mean get you in the back of your jaw sour. So anyway, this week when I made bread we used it to make french toast. YUMMY! And the homemade syrup evened out the sour nicely. I am going to start weaning myself off the pricey KA flour now that my mother is well developed and use my own fresh ground ww flour. Any ideas on how to cut down on the sour? A little is good but this is way too much! D

Thistle Sprig Farm


Reply author: AuntPammy
Replied on: Feb 11 2009 08:08:40 AM
Message:

My DH loves the sour, but I can't handle it either. I would welcome any suggestions as well. Blessings, Pam

"Keep your face to the sunshine and you will never see the shadow." Helen Keller

www.auntpsalmostheaven.blogspot.com


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Feb 11 2009 08:15:25 AM
Message:

If you bake with it more often it will reduce the sourness of the bread. I have been baking with mine every couple of days and so using higher volumes water and flour to replenish the starter. And my bread is much less sour than before (which is fine with me!) This seems to keep the sourness down. If you can't bake with it as often, think of dumping a cup or two a day before you are going to use it and then replace it with about the same volume in flour/water mix. That way your starter stays fed, but you get rid of the matured sour taste.

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: Carrie M
Replied on: Feb 11 2009 08:16:26 AM
Message:

My molasses bread turned out great in texture and all, but I had added flax meal to boost the nutritional value and I added too much. A tablespoon or so would be good but I went over that :)

The molasses worked well and gave me a nice dark loaf. Also, adding some quick oats in place of some of the flour was good. That loaf had a great taste and texture and the oats were a nice little bit of chewiness that I like. It was excellent toasted for breakfast!

Also-I think the molasses over came the sourdough flavor a little so that if anyone doesn't care for the sourness this may be a trick to use. I like the flavor, but also like the taste of molasses, so it is good either way for me. If anyone wanted to make a marble loaf, you could mix some molasses in half or make two separate recipes, one with molasses and one with honey, then roll them out and layer them, roll them up together, rise and bake. It would make one of those fancy loaves that I see all the time!

CArrie M

www.totallykadeshfarm.blogspot.com

Farmgirl Sisterhood #147

Tis better to weep at joy than to joy at weeping--Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


Reply author: Carrie M
Replied on: Feb 11 2009 08:18:11 AM
Message:

Kelly-

I sometimes use loaf pans--they work for no knead to help reduce the spreading out. Use oil on the sides and parchment in the bottom to help get it out, though!!

CArrie m

www.totallykadeshfarm.blogspot.com

Farmgirl Sisterhood #147

Tis better to weep at joy than to joy at weeping--Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


Reply author: Carrie M
Replied on: Feb 11 2009 08:22:09 AM
Message:

Cathy-

I made some rolls that would work for soup bowls. They needed to be kneaded to get enough firmness into them. I let them rise for only a couple hours, then baked at a little higher temp for less time, like 20 min. What I did was I made a regular recipe of dough and then cut it in half, cut each half in half and then kneaded each piece of dough individually until it was firm. It was fun! They were excellent!!

carrie m

www.totallykadeshfarm.blogspot.com

Farmgirl Sisterhood #147

Tis better to weep at joy than to joy at weeping--Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


Reply author: Carrie M
Replied on: Feb 11 2009 08:27:45 AM
Message:

Dear Lora-

Your loaves looked so lovely!! I'm so sorry they were not as yummy a treat as they look in the photos!!! They had nice shape and the slits in the top worked well, too. They look just like Rock Hill Bakehouse's sourdough loaves!

Hope your next adventure brings you a full stomach!

PS- I need to use higher heat--about 15 degrees-- than what is called for, as well as 5-10 extra minutes. Try that next time:)

CArrie

www.totallykadeshfarm.blogspot.com

Farmgirl Sisterhood #147

Tis better to weep at joy than to joy at weeping--Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


Reply author: Carrie M
Replied on: Feb 11 2009 08:32:00 AM
Message:

Daisy-

I find that using whole wheat flour cuts the sour somewhat. Whenever my mother gets too pungent smelling I just use the whole wheat to feed her and over a couple days I notice a huge difference. whole wheat flour will also reduce the rising, however, and may require a little more "working" to get a rise. Just knead a bit or use a dough hook and work it in the mixer before adding the final cup of flour.

Let me know if you get the same results with the sour reduction.

Carrie

www.totallykadeshfarm.blogspot.com

Farmgirl Sisterhood #147

Tis better to weep at joy than to joy at weeping--Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


Reply author: gardenmaam
Replied on: Feb 11 2009 10:01:55 AM
Message:

Carrie -
Thanks for the info on how you did the bread rolls. I am looking forward to trying that on Monday.
Good to hear the suggestions on how to cut down the sour taste. I will try some and see how next weeks batch is in that regard.

Freezing bread loaves - Anyone have luck freezing this bread with good results? I know if I make small rolls ("bowls") for the soup we will only use two. Can save the others for following week maybe.


Reply author: pearlgirl
Replied on: Feb 11 2009 2:42:35 PM
Message:

If you aren't using your starter very often refrigerating it may help it stay mild.

Here are some instructions for keeping it in the refrigerator from sourdoughhome.com : Feed your starter until it will double in size between feedings, feed it one more time and then refrigerate it. The storage starter will need to be fed from time to time. I do not suggest leaving a storage starter in the fridge for more than two months without feeding it and reviving it. Let starter you are going to use come to room temperature and use it.

Also, feeding it twice a day helps keep it lively. I bake at least twice a week so I just feed my 1/4c. water and 1/3c. flour when I wake up and before I go to bed. It hasn't been very sour at all for me.

Also, I noticed a big difference in sourness between my two, four, and six hour rises. By giving it a nice warm environment with no draft it can rise in two hours and hardly be sour. I just heat up my cast iron before putting the dough in it (you could warm glass up by filling it with boiling water) and put it in a warm oven to rise. Leaving it four hours I think gives the best flavor.

Favour is deceitful, and beauty is vain: but a woman that feareth the LORD, she shall be praised. Give her of the fruit of her hands; and let her own works praise her in the gates.
Pro 31:30,31

http://pearlsgleanings.blogspot.com/
http://www.pearlgirl901.etsy.com/


Reply author: MaryJane
Replied on: Feb 11 2009 4:38:34 PM
Message:

Hello bread enthusiasts!
I had time for a few quick photos so I wanted to share a few more bread and pan options. Below is a double batch of my olive-garlic bread recipe found on page 72 of the Simply Bee issue. (I used all organic white and no rye.) I could tell a double batch was too much for my loaf pan so I grabbed one of my antique cast iron muffin pans and loaded it with dollops of dough also. (I buttered it first. For the loaf pan, I lined it with parchment paper because it’s an old pan with a few chips. If you smear a bit of butter in the pan before you put the parchment in, it will stay in place better while you’re putting the dough in.) For this recipe I used gourmet deli olives that I chopped up. I used fresh garlic and fresh rosemary and thyme. Yum. The aroma as it baked was, well, salivary.




In the next pic you can see how much it rose during the day, about 8 hours. I kept a wet towel over them.



Here are the rolls. They tested done at 15 minutes with my instant read thermometer. We slathered them with soft artisan cheese. (Next issue of the magazine, I’m going to teach you how to make soft gourmet cheeses using milk, cream and vinegar.)



I left the loaf pan in the oven a lot longer than the rolls--almost another 15 minutes. I wanted a super thick hard crust. But even with the extra oven time, I made sure my thermometer read at least 195 degrees before I pulled it out and called it done.





Notice the exquisite texture on this loaf. It was divine--chewy, not crumbly, but perfectly DONE. My granddaughter ate not one but three slices this morning! Just remember that you want your dough a little sticky going into the pan (and yes, obviously a loaf pan works.) It isn’t necessary to knead it. This loaf was not kneaded AT ALL. Starters (mothers) vary in terms of thin/thick so you might have to make a tiny adjustment in the amount of flour you add to make a batch of bread. Don’t make it too dry or too wet. Hey, why don’t you all just come here for one of my week-long Pay Dirt Farm School sessions and we’ll bake bread the entire week






Next week, I'll show you how to make French baguettes w/o kneading. Easy Peasy.

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~


Reply author: gramadinah
Replied on: Feb 11 2009 5:07:58 PM
Message:

When is the Pay dirt farm school for bread making Im am in.

Diana

Farmgirl Sister #273


Reply author: FarmGirl~K
Replied on: Feb 11 2009 5:15:07 PM
Message:

Well I jumped on the bandwagon this past Sunday. My starter was looking great. Getting bubbly already. But today when I came home from work to add my flour & water my DH notice an area that looked dark. Almost black. It didnt look like mold, but I dumped it anyway just in case. Just wondering, could leaving the spoon in the mother have caused this? I am using organic unbleached flour & purified water. Not sure of the brand of flour but its not KA as I couldnt find it here.

Not giving up, will start again on Sunday. I am so looking forward to trying this. Everyone's pictures look wonderfully yummy!

Thanks for sharing this with us MaryJane. I love the fact that I will be able to make fresh bread for my family & do it easily without always using my breadmaker. It actually seems to take less time with the sour dough. A co-worker also gave me a friendship bread starter today too so I will work on that until I can move on w/my sourdough.

"I have an irrepressible desire to live till I can be assured that the world is a little better for my having lived in it."
– Abraham Lincoln


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 11 2009 5:28:07 PM
Message:

Kelly - I wouldn't suggest leaving the spoon in. The spoon could have some bad bacterias deep inside that leech out while it sits there. I'd have to see it to be sure if what was going on was bad or not. If it was BLACK you probably did the right thing by dumping it. However, after several days you will start to get hooch (an alcohol liquid) that will seperate on top. Sometimes it can appear grayish in color. That is normal.

MaryJane - the breads look fabulous! Thanks for showing the different pan options. I've got a fun recipe up my sleeve for this weekend that I will be sharing early next week. I am SO excited about the cheese you mentioned! I think cheese making is going to be the next big thing I try. YUM!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: chessie
Replied on: Feb 11 2009 5:31:07 PM
Message:

Dear MaryJane, A week of bread baking with you? Are you serious? Oh my gosh, heaven on earth! How much moola and when?

Homemade Cheese? I am giddy with anticipation (well, even more giddy than I was already) for the next issue...

BTW- My sisterhood special MaryJanesFarm organic flour just arrived, and I am over the moon, with happiness.

Love, Karen

www.edgehillherbfarm.com "where the name is bigger than the farm, but no one seems to mind"
blog http://edgehillherbfarmer.spaces.live.com/default.aspx?wa=wsignin1.0
happy farmgirl #89


Reply author: kristin sherrill
Replied on: Feb 11 2009 7:26:23 PM
Message:

Thanks for all the pictures, Mary Jane. It's always nice to see other people's bread.

My cranberry-nut bread is SO good. I had bought a loaf at Whole Foods when I was in Col. and have tried to get the same thing using my whole wheat recipe, but it was never the same. It must have been a sour dough bread, because it takes just like it. I am so glad I made it. I am going to try the olive garlic bread next.

And the crackers are almost all gone. I told my husband to save one to see how long they lastbefore going stale. We'll see. All in all, a good baking day for me here.

Kris

Turn your face to the sun and the shadows fall behind you. Maori proverb


Reply author: FarmGirl~K
Replied on: Feb 11 2009 7:33:54 PM
Message:

Thanks for the quick answer Julie. I definitely dont think it was hooch because it wasnt liquid. My mother was still pretty thick.

I think it was the spoon. The spoon changed color as well. Which I noticed while washing everything. It was a new spoon. I know not to do that next time.

Guess I should have known better to begin with. I was encouraged though to see how quickly the bubbles started to form. Can't wait to get started again!

"I have an irrepressible desire to live till I can be assured that the world is a little better for my having lived in it."
– Abraham Lincoln


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 11 2009 8:08:10 PM
Message:

Kelly - was it a wooden spoon? Make sure you don't use metal. Also you can go ahead and start your starter now. Just make pancakes next Saturday morning after you set your dough to rise and that will take care of the extra. Plus that will give your starter a little extra time to mature and you will get a better rise on that first loaf. Good luck !

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: FarmGirl~K
Replied on: Feb 12 2009 05:26:32 AM
Message:

Julie- Yes it was wooden. I may start on it tonight when I get home. I'll let you know how my first loaf turns out! Thanks again for all of your help & advice. You sure have put a lot of time into answering all of our questions.

"I have an irrepressible desire to live till I can be assured that the world is a little better for my having lived in it."
– Abraham Lincoln


Reply author: Quintessential Kate
Replied on: Feb 12 2009 05:40:41 AM
Message:

Gosh....It's been a month since I joined in with this awesome breadmaking adventure. I have enjoyed it so much and have learned so much and eaten (and given away) so much bread. On bread making days...that is supper. I mix up some herbs and olive oil and some hard cheeses......maybe some sun dried tomatoes...and that's what hubby and I have. I very seldom drink alcohol (anymore)...but I have to admit, on "bread night" we have a glass of red wine....(and of course, a small square of dark chocolate). It's almost become "date night".....we savor our bread, sip our wine while we are curled up watching a movie. It's great!
MaryJane....I am so excited about the cheese making. We will incorporate cheese into our bread night! Thank you for your dedication and vision.
Ciao, Kate

Heart of Texas
Chapter
AKA: Hot Farmgirl #234
http://quintessentialkate.blogspot.com

Today is my best day!


Reply author: Amie C.
Replied on: Feb 12 2009 05:56:03 AM
Message:

Yeah, I can't wait for the cheese making directions! Thanks for putting this info out in such an accessible way, Mary Jane.

I got a really successful sourdough loaf yesterday. Best one yet. I made a double batch in my cast iron dutch oven (it's 5 or 6 quart size, so too big for a single batch). I've been holding off on using it, because I keep forgetting to buy parchment paper, but yesterday I decided to just slather the bottom and sides with butter and give it a try. The bread is delicious, and I had no trouble getting it out of the dutch oven. Came out just like a sandcastle.


Reply author: nancylee
Replied on: Feb 12 2009 07:21:34 AM
Message:

I've tried making the bread twice now following the directions using king arthur bread flour each time it did not rise, what could be wrong? Would altitude have any bearing on it we live at the 7000 ft elev.


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 12 2009 07:38:30 AM
Message:

Nancy - I don't really know anything about elevation. Maybe someone else can chime in on that. How old is your starter? Are you feeding it everyday and are you seeing bubbles on it after feeding? What type of water are you using?

Also - personally I was not a big fan of the KA Bread flour for making bread. I would suggest you use the KA All purpose flour if it is available in your area. The bread flour seemed very doughy even after a good rise and baking to 200.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: urban farm girl
Replied on: Feb 12 2009 09:14:14 AM
Message:

Ok I've made my third loaf today and I'm sure hoping everything turns out ok. last week went to look for a cast iron pot or whatever and nothing....so I lined a regular loaf pan with parchment paper and as some of the others did i put it in the oven with the light on and we'll see what happens. I love your photo's MaryJane!!


Reply author: jpbluesky
Replied on: Feb 12 2009 09:25:01 AM
Message:

I wondered about altitude and humidity, too. In FLorida, we live at almost sea level, and in a very humid climate. That must make a difference than out west where it is so dry and much higher? I will let you know when my bread is ready to bake, if it behaves any different....also some climates must have a lot more natural tendency toward mold, ours being one....

I got the organic all purpose flour. I am really looking forward to getting started!

Farmgirl Sister # 31

www.blueskyjeannie.blogspot.com

Psalm 51: 10-13


Reply author: little.fish
Replied on: Feb 12 2009 11:25:25 AM
Message:

I've been having a great time with this sourdough recipe, too! I decided to try making my starter and bread with fresh ground (fine setting), organic whole wheat, and I think it turned out really well. I added a little more than 1/4 cup water to the starter each time since it seemed to need it (I don't know if this is b/c of the whole wheat).

The first loaf I baked after 7 days was really flat, but still chewy and good. The second week I made 2 loaves (added extra to my starter during the week). I made a loaf of the regular and one of the cinnamon raisin. They both rose nicely and the cinnamon raisin was gone before the week was done! The texture is more dense than normal white-flour sourdough would be, but is nice.

Like someone mentioned earlier, I also used molasses instead of sugar. Also, my bread needed 1 to 1 1/4 tsp. salt (I'm guessing b/c of whole wheat, again?) The second 2 loaves I made, I baked in 1. a small cheesecake pan and 2. a bread pan. Both worked really well.

Thanks so much for a wonderful recipe!

"...plain Kate, and bonny Kate, and sometimes Kate the curst..."


Reply author: pearlgirl
Replied on: Feb 12 2009 1:07:46 PM
Message:

My starter is 3 weeks old and she improves with age! Today it made the most beautiful loaf of bread. I used 1 1/2 c. whole wheat (prarie gold) flour and kneaded it in my stand mixer for 8 minutes. I think the kneading helped the center rise. I am quite delighted!
Last weeks bread:

This weeks bread:


I made another loaf of cinnamon-raisin bread and it was much more dense than my other breads, has anyone else noticed that recipe being more dense? Maybe my starter just wasn't in a good mood Tuesday.

Favour is deceitful, and beauty is vain: but a woman that feareth the LORD, she shall be praised. Give her of the fruit of her hands; and let her own works praise her in the gates.
Pro 31:30,31

http://pearlsgleanings.blogspot.com/
http://www.pearlgirl901.etsy.com/


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 12 2009 1:48:15 PM
Message:

That is beautiful Lydia! Thanks for sharing pictures!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: campchic
Replied on: Feb 12 2009 5:03:03 PM
Message:

Alee, did you use a french bread form or just free form it?

Erin

Farmgirl #190
www.concrete-and-grace.blogspot.com


Reply author: urban farm girl
Replied on: Feb 13 2009 06:27:19 AM
Message:

Well I did my third try and no luck....hmmmm. i truly don't know what the problem is, do it very accordingly, at least i think i am. Some had a rise after 4 hours at 5 hours or so nothing. I know others are using different flours and getting results. I really don't know.


Reply author: Suzan
Replied on: Feb 13 2009 06:56:13 AM
Message:

I'm with you, Melissa, I did my second loaf yesterday and it still didn't raise much, my mother looks great but I can't get it to raise...used a smaller pan on second thinking it would raise higher but no.


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 13 2009 08:12:08 AM
Message:

Girls please give me specifics - outline your process for me and I can try to narrow down the problem. Likely it is something very simple.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Feb 13 2009 08:34:44 AM
Message:

Hi Erin-

I just free-formed it. It was 1 1/2 cups starter, 4 cups flour, 2 teaspoons salt and 1 cup warm water. Warm water should be around 90 degrees but not hotter than 95.

With starter in bowl, stir in one cup flour, sprinkle in salt and continue to add in more flour 1/2 cup at a time until dough starts forming up and leaving side of bowl.

Turn onto floured board and knead in more flour until smooth and elastic.

Put in warm 4 quart bowl with steep sides to rise until doubled in bulk, around 2 hours if you have a really active starter, but don't panic if it takes up to 8. Cover bowl during rise with plastic wrap or damp cloth as the dough has no oil to prevent dryness.

Bowl should be proofed or set to rise in an 85 degree environment.

When dough has doubled, turn it out on a slightly floured board and knead for 30 seconds. Cut in half and from into an oval in your hand by folding it over on itself and pinching shut the bottom. Then roll on board like play dough to lengthen until it is almost as long as the baking sheet. Place on lightly greased sheet that has been sprinkled with cornmeal.

Use glasses to drape a wet cloth around the bread but not touching. Set to rise again in the 85 degree environment for another hour or until double in bulk.

Slash the top 3 times with sharp knife or razor blade. Brush tops with cold water and then place in 400 degree oven. Set a muffin tin of boiling water (use a kettle to pour the water in after you put the tin in please!) on the bottom of the stove and place the bread on the rack just slightly above center. After 10 minutes carefully remove tin of water and bake for an additional 30 minutes or until browned and done.

Recipe in abbreviated form from "Adventures in Sourdough Cooing and Baking" By Charles D. Wilford.



Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: urban farm girl
Replied on: Feb 13 2009 09:29:04 AM
Message:

Ok Julie.....I take out 2 cups of mother and do the basic white Farmhouse bread to the exact ingredients. This week I lined a regular loaf pan with parchment paper.....before putting in the pan I mixed it in glass 8c measure bowl. I didn't knead it..right...but it was not sticky when I put in the loaf pan. I followed the directions from the mag. for the bread. Then I put it in the oven with the light on for about 5 hours and no rise what so ever. I'm just about out of flour so I'll try and get the KA flour. Next time I try can you come over please:)!


Reply author: Cowgirl Jess
Replied on: Feb 13 2009 11:03:23 AM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by nancylee

I've tried making the bread twice now following the directions using king arthur bread flour each time it did not rise, what could be wrong? Would altitude have any bearing on it we live at the 7000 ft elev.



Dear Nancylee, I am convinced that elevation makes a difference. I am at about 3000 ft and I have found that I almost always have to add more liquid to get the best results. I hope this helps- of course you will have to experiment but possibly your bread is too heavy to rise.

Do not worry about tomorrow, today has enough worries of it's own.


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 13 2009 12:57:49 PM
Message:

Melissa - I would love to come over but its a little far. I was just in Rockton/Rockford last week. It sounds like you are doing all the right stuff for the baking process. What is the process you are doing for the starter and what brand and kind of flour are you using?

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: urban farm girl
Replied on: Feb 13 2009 1:20:39 PM
Message:

Julie....the flour is organic Arrowhead Mills unbleached white flour and was using distilled water. Each day I would add 1/3 cup of the flour and 1/4 water in the morning. Throughout the week it looked and smelled like it should. Today I went out and could not find organic KA flour just the regular KA all purpose flour. Hmmm. I'll keep trying. By the way my brother and sister-n-law live in Rockford so I go there once and while.


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Feb 13 2009 3:18:32 PM
Message:

Melissa- how old is your starter. The older it gets the runnier it seems to be (I think this is because you have a yeast colony metabolizing the flour starches and the yeast "float" in the water) so if you have a younger starter I would suggest only adding flour until you get to the consistency of the bread show in the pictures. MaryJane mentioned this towards the bottom of her post on page 38 of this thread.

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: ruralfarmgirl
Replied on: Feb 13 2009 7:12:00 PM
Message:

I know that there are some KEY things here 1) the quality of the water you are using even if you think you have good water, try using purified water... 2) the quality of the flour, 3) the freshness of the flour. All flour isn’t equal and even all Organic flour isn’t equal. Make sure that you check the "ingredients" and that the company isn’t using fillers.... (Barley or other heavier grains), also check the date... sometimes; if your grocer is selling organics and they don’t move quickly, the oils in the flour can go stagnate. When you start the mother... day 2 you should get a "sweet smell” if it starts to smell rancid... then possibly you are working with an old flour.

For those that are struggling, I would encourage you to get some of MaryJanes Flour because we KNOW that this is freshly milled in Montana using a high quality PURE grain....If you still struggle then try adjusting your water source.

Lastly, if you spray or use a disinfectant or other chemicals in your kitchen, this will kill your "mother", as the fermentation, is absorbing the air... to help feed the mixture....also......make sure the cover you are putting over the mixture is chemical free....as it is being absorbed as well....

While is can be discouraging when you can’t get the mother to take...... I promise once you find the right combination it will be totally worth it....


Rene~Prosser Farmgirl #185
http://farmchicksfarm.blogspot.com/http://renenaturallyspeaking.blogspot.com/



Circumstances made us FRIENDS; MaryJane's has made us SISTERS :)


Reply author: urban farm girl
Replied on: Feb 13 2009 8:55:50 PM
Message:

Good info I'm going to check it all out,thanks, appreciate it. I sure do love this farm girl thing!!!!!


Reply author: campchic
Replied on: Feb 14 2009 05:35:07 AM
Message:

Thank you, thank you, thank you, Alee! I'm going to try the french bread recipe today for Valentines day supper! I'll let you know how it turns out.

Erin

Farmgirl #190
www.concrete-and-grace.blogspot.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 14 2009 05:59:31 AM
Message:

Melissa - Rene said it all really well! In addition if the mother looks and smells well it could just be that it is slow to mature. The difference between my bread the first week and now is AMAZING. I have a starter going with the KA organic AP flour. It works pretty well. They do offer online ordering if that is something you are interested in. I also agree with Alee. If your dough is too dry you might want to add less flour so it looks more like MJs pictures. Addingmore flour will increase the need to Knead!

My sister and BIL and my 2 nephews live in Rockton!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: urban farm girl
Replied on: Feb 14 2009 07:14:52 AM
Message:

Hey Girls.....Yes maybe I'm adding too much flour plus I'm going to look into ordering the flour, I used distilled water before and just picked up purified water. I'm heading out to Farm and Fleet this weekend to see if they have any cast iron pots...

Yeah Rockton is right near Rockford,huh!Cool!


Reply author: Meadowflower
Replied on: Feb 14 2009 10:25:46 AM
Message:

Hi everyone!

OK I have a question.

I started the sourdough starter two weeks ago. Last weekend I made pancakes from a recipe on this thread, since everyone said bread the first week didn't come out as nicely as expected. The pancakes were not fluffy at all - more like crepes but everyone ate them.

My starter, instead of smelling sweetly sour, smells now like vinegar! It's a hard, vinegar smell. My kids even asked "What smells so sour?" in the kitchen. Is my sourdough supposed to smell like vinegar?

If so I'll go ahead and make the bread with it. However, if it's going to come out badly I'd rather not waste the new flour and try and start it again.

Here's what I've done:
* Week one - dry cloth over top
* Saturday - removed starter for pancakes and let it rest
* Sunday - put wet towel over top.
* During this week I missed one day of feeding flour+water. It was after this day when things started to go bad.
* Starter has been out on the counter the entire time.

Please tell me if I've done something incorrect. Or if the starter is really supposed to smell like vinegar. :D

Thanks!

*~Lisa~*

My farmish blog: http://meadowflowerfarm.blogspot.com/


Reply author: Firemama
Replied on: Feb 14 2009 11:51:30 AM
Message:

I must admit, I have given up. I might try again when it warms up. My mother looks good,smells sour and hoochy ; ) .Starts to rise and then poops out.I've tried the heating pad under it, but she just isnt doing good.I have Organic Flour, and the right water, the dough just doesnt do good.So poo, I guess I just have to knead it out....

Mama to 2
FarmGirl# 20

People can only make you feel inferior with your permission, and you dont have my permission......

Dont let the chain of love end with you.....

http://myfarmdreams.blogspot.com/


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Feb 14 2009 1:17:43 PM
Message:

Amanda- how old is your starter? *hugs* I miss popping up to Spokane to see you!

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: Firemama
Replied on: Feb 14 2009 1:34:04 PM
Message:

Alee my starter was 3 weeks old. The second batch rose nicely, but I wasnt working that day so I could leave the stove on to warm it. The other times the dough just got harder than a puck.So I am looking at some different starters, because I really loved the taste of it. Had never made it before this. I really think its just too cold in our house right now.

Mama to 2
FarmGirl# 20

People can only make you feel inferior with your permission, and you dont have my permission......

Dont let the chain of love end with you.....

http://myfarmdreams.blogspot.com/


Reply author: Gaelic Gardener
Replied on: Feb 14 2009 1:57:51 PM
Message:

I am at the end of the first week of the process. My starter is still doughy, not liquid like in the pictures, although it is less solid and more liquid than the first couple of days. It does have a "tangy" smell. I'm going to give it another week -- I think it's because my house is on the cold side. Should I keep the towel dry or should I switch to the wet towel now?
thanks,
Kelly


Reply author: olive610
Replied on: Feb 14 2009 2:19:34 PM
Message:

I want to make the pancakes tomorrow and I just can't find the recipe within this thread. Can somebody point me in the right direction? I am bleary-eyed trying to locate it. Thanks in advance for any help.

"Life is a great big canvas, and you should throw all the paint on it you can." Danny Kaye


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 14 2009 3:38:10 PM
Message:

Lisa I'm not sure what to tell you about the pancakes mine came out very fluffy. It sounds like you are doing everything right. My starters have a vinegary smell which is strongest just before they get fed. This is normal.

Kelly the wet towel is just to keep the top of your started from drying out and getting a skin on in. If it is rtaying moist you could probably stay with dry. I only wet mine every other day.

Mary-Alice the pancake recipe is on page 13 about half way down.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: olive610
Replied on: Feb 14 2009 4:20:42 PM
Message:

Thank you so much. It's pancakes for our breakfast tomorrow. Thanks again Julie.

"Life is a great big canvas, and you should throw all the paint on it you can." Danny Kaye


Reply author: Suzan
Replied on: Feb 14 2009 4:43:53 PM
Message:

Julie, My mother looks great, not sure what is going wrong, but not giving up. I'm using KA organic all purpose flour and well water, like I said the starter looks just fine. My first week I baked in my dutch oven so I wasn't surprised when it didn't get very high, but the second week I baked it in a pyrex casserole that was smaller width and it still didn't raise much. I always scoop up my flour and shake off the measuring cup, I'm thinking maybe I get too much flour in? Tomorrow I'm off to see if I can locate a smaller cast iron pan, as I definitely could see a difference between using the cast iron and the pyrex (I preferred the cast iron). Another question, do you think if I used a double batch I could use my bigger cast iron pan as long as I baked it until it reached the 195-200 degrees in the middle?


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 14 2009 5:19:29 PM
Message:

Yes doing a double batch is just fine. You will need to add extra "food" to your starter during the week to make up for the extra you will be removing. You will also want to watch closley as you add your flor before baking. You may need mor and youmay need less depending on the thickness of your starter. I have a small 2 at cast iron Dutch oven and it works pretty well. I'd still like to get my hands on a saucepan like MaryJane uses. Hers is narrower and taller and would be better for sandwich bread.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Pearlsnjeans
Replied on: Feb 14 2009 5:39:19 PM
Message:

Hi all. Today I made pancakes. They were light, fluffy and delicious. My kids came over just before noon and ate quite a few cold with raspberry jam! My bread is baking now. I used a little less flour today and the rise was great. Hopefully, it will not be quite so hard.

Vicki
Farmgirl Sister #120
Today well lived makes every yesterday a memory of happiness and every tomorrow a vision of hope.


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 14 2009 7:23:06 PM
Message:

Great to hear Vicki! I have 2 new recipes I'm working on that I hope to share with you all on Monday.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: gardenmaam
Replied on: Feb 14 2009 9:26:53 PM
Message:

I read something interesting today in the May June '08 COOKs Magazine; It says that there's a french tool, called a lame used to slash the top of the bread just before baking.(I used a serrated knife) The magazine states that using a single edged razor blade works perfectly. Use the tip only.
I'll try that Monday when I bake.
Anyone heard of using a razor blade for that?


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 14 2009 9:48:05 PM
Message:

I have used a razor blade and it makes a much smoother cut. Honestly though a really sharp paring knife works just as well if it has a fairly thin blade.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Meadowflower
Replied on: Feb 15 2009 03:54:39 AM
Message:

Julie,

Thank you so very much for answering my question.

Since it's right that my mother smells vinegar, I'm going to give the bread a go today! I'll post what happens here. :)

I don't know why my pancakes didn't come out fluffy either. Maybe my baking powder was old? I never use it so it's ancient. Maybe it had no more energy left in it

*~Lisa~*

My farmish blog: http://meadowflowerfarm.blogspot.com/


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 15 2009 05:24:17 AM
Message:

Lisa - I have really learned that fresh baking powder is important! I wish it cam in smaller containers! I replace mine every 6 months regardless of whether it is all gone or not. Also when I made the pancakes I mix my batter and then let it rest while I made bacon and potatoes. When I got ready to make the pancakes it was already bubbly and "rising" some. It looked active. I'll work on getting some pictures made of the batter.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Suzan
Replied on: Feb 15 2009 05:40:41 AM
Message:

Thanks, Julie. Have any cinnamon roll recipes using the starter been posted here or have I missed them?


Reply author: kristin sherrill
Replied on: Feb 15 2009 05:49:01 AM
Message:

Has anyone made the crackers yet from the pizza dough recipe? I had to make more yesterday b/c hubby ate all the ones I made Wed. They are so easy to make and don't take but a few minutes to do. And they are so good, too.

Kris

Turn your face to the sun and the shadows fall behind you. Maori proverb


Reply author: Gaelic Gardener
Replied on: Feb 15 2009 07:12:39 AM
Message:

Lisa & Julie -- Make your own baking powder:
1/2 teaspoon cream of tartar
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon cornstarch


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 15 2009 07:22:25 AM
Message:

Suzanne - I haven't posted a cinnamon roll recipe yet but have on in the works. I haven't tested it yet but would be happy to email it to you off the forum if you are interested in trying it. I prefer not to post it until I have actually tried it myself incase my measurements are off on anything.

Kristen - I haven't tried the crackers yet.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: jpbluesky
Replied on: Feb 15 2009 10:16:30 AM
Message:



Well, it is Sunday, and let there be the "mother starter"! I began my starter dough today, and when I was done I thought.....hmmm..I used a metal spoon to measure the flour into my plastic dry measuring cup before adding it to the ceramic bowl. I hope that did not make a difference. Otherwise, I used wood to stir and the ceramic bowl and now I am thinking. "Do you all use a glass wet measure to measure your cups of flour or do you have glass dry measuring cups?"

Farmgirl Sister # 31

www.blueskyjeannie.blogspot.com

Psalm 51: 10-13


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 15 2009 10:32:23 AM
Message:

I use a metal measuring cup and haven't had any problems.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Suzan
Replied on: Feb 15 2009 11:14:52 AM
Message:

Julie, If you wouldn't mind emailing it I would love to test it! Thanks.


Reply author: K-Falls Farmgirl
Replied on: Feb 15 2009 11:23:52 AM
Message:

Well fellow farmgirls, I have been making "Bread the Mary Jane way" now for several weeks, My advice to all is Keep trying it, If you don't at first suceed. Each loaf I have made gets better each time. Yesterday I made 2 small loaves & 2 medium loaves. They were the best yet. I baked them in glass baking pans all different sizes. and this morning we ate one small loaf which when cut lengthwise in 4 long suts fir nicely in my toaster. Yummmmmmy! I used some of the starter Friday for Pancakes they were very good too. This sourdough "mother" crock will remain on my counter indefinately just bubbling with Love...

Cheryl
Farmgirl #309


Almost daily posts at:
http://www.k-fallsfarmgirl.blogspot.com/
Come visit the barn at http://barndoorcreations.blogspot.com/

Every time I hear the dirty word 'exercise',
I wash my mouth out with chocolate.


Reply author: Mountain Girl
Replied on: Feb 15 2009 11:25:39 AM
Message:

Here's my two cents worth. My husband is the breadmaker but I did some "googling" about sourdough starts and found this interesting --

"Many people complain about their home-baked sourdough breads that they are not sour enough. This is based on a misconception. The "sour" in "sourdough" refers to the acidity of the starter, not to the finished product. Many breads made from sourdough starter are actually sweet, and should be, if you are baking muffins or cake. Yes, some breads made with sourdough starter are more sour, because there was more acidic starter in the dough to begin with, or because it had longer to act on the flour because there was less starter. Professional bakers wanting to please the public's desire for "sour" sourdough get a more sour taste by forcing the yeast to work longer. There are several ways to do this, so try them all: 1) use much less starter, and then allow more time (as much as 20 hours) for the dough to rise; 2) punch the dough down more times (three or four times, rather than two), which also forces the dough to work longer. 3) use more starter. It will require some experimentation to find out what works best for you"

I found that the acidic part interesting because another site said if the started gets to acidic it will not rise well. Also (too lazy to look back on all the comments) does it say to scald your container you will be putting the starter in. You're suppose too. JoAnn


Reply author: knittingmomma
Replied on: Feb 15 2009 11:26:33 AM
Message:

We have been using Mary Jane's recipe since the day we received the magazine and love it! It is soooo simple. Enjoy.

Warm wishes,
Tonya

Handmade Treasures - http://knittingmomma.etsy.com
Blog - http://www.homesteadblogger.com/naturalearthfarm


Reply author: Ronna
Replied on: Feb 15 2009 12:17:32 PM
Message:

A Lame works a bit different from a sharp knife or razor blade. It has a curved blade, which undercuts the top layer of dough, allowing it to expand without a big split in the crust $6.95 from King Arthur catalog with no shipping charge. A sharp knife or razor blade works, just not as well and can leave ragged edges in the crust. The trick is to get just a very thin layer and not split the loaf.


Reply author: campchic
Replied on: Feb 15 2009 1:54:24 PM
Message:

The french bread turned out wonderful!! Thanks Alee for the guidance and the recipe. I will add it to my recipe file!

Erin

Farmgirl #190
www.concrete-and-grace.blogspot.com


Reply author: jpbluesky
Replied on: Feb 15 2009 2:02:22 PM
Message:

This afternoon I found a cast iron big loaf pan, and gotit for 12.00. It does not have a lid, but I plan to come up with something to cover it with while the dough is rising.....has anyone used a cast iron loaf pan?

Farmgirl Sister # 31

www.blueskyjeannie.blogspot.com

Psalm 51: 10-13


Reply author: Cowgirl Jess
Replied on: Feb 15 2009 2:25:12 PM
Message:

jpbluesky It's not ideal but if you begin to bake your loaf (about 5min) it should be firm enough by then to place tin foil over it. You can re-use the foil each time until you can get a lid.

I wondered if anyone has tried the sourdough with gluten free flour? I am about to bake my first loaf using fresh milled organic brown rice, I think this week when I feed the starter I will need to use a different ratio of water to flour because it seems quite dense and dry - will let you know how it goes!

Also a note about the starters that are having difficulty getting going - I wondered if you are all using warm water when adding to the "Mother", mine is doing well but I always use lukewarm water, it helps her stay humid!

Do not worry about tomorrow, today has enough worries of it's own.
visit me at www.glutenfree4goofs.wordpress.com


Reply author: Deni
Replied on: Feb 15 2009 4:16:58 PM
Message:

Hello and thanks for having me! I'm new to Mary Janes Farm. Picked up a copy of the mag - first time I've seen it in Missouri - a little over 2 weeks ago. BECAUSE of the Artisan Bread cover - mostly! So I immediately went to my local health food store and bought three kinds of organic (yes, whole wheat) flour, bread, pastry and just plain.

I followed the directions for week one carefully, up until time to bake it. Then I overbeat it - even put it in my standing mixer because the starter went from workable to stiff too fast - and undoubtedly killed the poor thing. I let it rise - well, sit - over 8 hours, then baked it and ate it anyway. It tasted good.

On to week two: now covered with damp cloth, looked bubbly and great every day - smells just like sourdough should. Put the bread together this morning. Again, the flour seemed to dry it out, but I put it in a caster iron pot this time (oh, yeah, last week I put it on parchment) and put it close to a light bulb to help with warmth. I waved my magic wand over it and left it alone. Five hours later it appeared exactly as before.

So I heated the cast iron lid over a burner, turned the burner off and put the lid on and moved the pot onto the warm spot on the stove top. I also turned on the oven.

I feel like the starter is doing just fine, except for making the bread rise. Should I use less flour? What about kneading it a little more. Does that help or hurt? I've read about 8 pages of posts from the beginning and a few from more recently. I hope this isn't really redundant.

I really loved my first exposure to MJF. Found it inspirational. I'm happy to be joining such enterprising and industrious women.

Thanks for the assistance.

sunshinedreamkitchen.blogspot.com


Reply author: khartquilt
Replied on: Feb 15 2009 4:18:06 PM
Message:

Well I made my second loaf yesterday. Well, it was more of a rock then a loaf. I dont know what went wrong. My starter is much more looser. It smells great. But after adding the flour, It did not raise. And It was terrible. But...I am not giving up. I will try again next weekend. By then I should have my smaller pot. I am currently using a 6 quart roaster.



Kathy H
Farmgirl Sister #81
"To the world you may be one person, but to one person you may be the world..." (anomymous)
http://khartquilt.blogspot.com


Reply author: jpbluesky
Replied on: Feb 15 2009 4:35:23 PM
Message:

wow - this is really an art, isn't it? All kinds of results, some so easy, and others not so much. I hope I can make it work! My daughter and I both started ours today....it will be fun to compare our results since we live in the same climate.

Farmgirl Sister # 31

www.blueskyjeannie.blogspot.com

Psalm 51: 10-13


Reply author: Quintessential Kate
Replied on: Feb 15 2009 4:57:36 PM
Message:

Welcome from Texas, Deni!!! You're gonna love it here.
Ciao, Kate

Heart of Texas
Chapter
AKA: Hot Farmgirl #234
http://quintessentialkate.blogspot.com

Today is my best day!


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Feb 15 2009 5:07:28 PM
Message:

Deni- I believe that whole wheat has a much harder time rising then white flour. It will almost always create a denser bread and I think the yeast have a harder time accessing the energy from the wheat. Maybe as your starter continues to mature it will do better?

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 15 2009 5:43:18 PM
Message:

Deni you really should be using white flour for your starter. If you want a wheat bread add wheat flour when you mix to bake. It has something to do with gluten and blah,blah, balh! Also take a look at the picture in the magazine. I fear many of us may be adding too much flour. It should look moist like the picture. Remember this is a NO KNEAD bread so the properties of the dough may be slightly different than what you are used to.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 15 2009 5:45:27 PM
Message:

All right girls I have a YUMMY recipe to share again this weekend!

Sourdough Bagels
1 Cup starter
1/4 Cup vegetable oil (I used canola oil)
1/4 Cup warm water
2 tsp. Salt
2 – 2 1/2 Cups flour
Egg
Spices and seeds for topping.
Salt for water (about 1/8 cup)


In a handled mixing bowl combine starter, oil, water, 2 tsp. of salt and the flour. Start with 2 cups and add more if needed. Mix dough with a spoon. Turn dough onto a floured surface and knead just until all the flour is incorporated and the dough is smooth. Place dough in a bowl and cover with a moist towel. Allow to rise several hours or overnight. Turn dough out and divide into 8 equal pieces for standard bagels or 4 – 6 pieces for jumbo bagels. Work each piece of dough into a pancake shape, poke a hole in the middle with your finger and shape the bagel. Set aside and repeat for each bagel. Allow bagels to rest about 30 minutes. While bagels rest, preheat your oven to 425 and put on a big pot of water to boil. This is also a good time to mix up your topping(see below). When water has come to a boil add 1/8 cup of salt to the water and stir well. Making sure you maintain a full boil add bagels 2-4 at a time (depending on the size of your pot) to the boiling water. Boil 2-3 minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon to a rack. Repeat. Mix an egg until light yellow and brush over the tops of the slightly cooled bagels. Bake plain or dip into a spice and seed mixture. Place on a sheet pan coated with cornmeal and bake 12 – 15 minutes or until golden in color.

Toppings
You can use your imagination with the toppings or you can leave your bagels plain. For my bagels I used a combination of black pepper, kosher salt, poppy seeds, dill seeds and onion powder.

These have a wonderful thin crunchy outside and a moist chewey center! They were so good!

















Enjoy!
Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Deni
Replied on: Feb 15 2009 7:30:13 PM
Message:

Kate, Alee, Julie -- Thanks for the welcome and advice. Here is the update on my bread -- it made!! Yes, indeed, 8 hours and an increase in heat caused it to double. I think that's fabulous. And it is all-wheat. I think using the pastry flour really helped. I haven't used white flour in so long - even unbleached - that I was willing to be experimental. But, I think I will get some and add it to my Mother.

Anyway - looking forward to homebaked sourdough this week. Will let you know how it crumbs when it cools.

By the way - I saw the first Robin on Friday. Spring is surely on its way!

sunshinedreamkitchen.blogspot.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 15 2009 7:47:47 PM
Message:

Wow glad to hear the wheat worked well for you!

The robins winter here so we see them all year. We do have some daffodils blooming though!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: chessie
Replied on: Feb 15 2009 9:00:07 PM
Message:

Somebody asked...
....I use a cast iron loaf pan and i don't worry about not having a cover. I line the pan with parchment and put it to rise in my cold oven with the light on about 12 hours. I take it out to preheat oven and then back into hot oven to bake over a full muffin pan of water. Wonderful!

www.edgehillherbfarm.com "where the name is bigger than the farm, but no one seems to mind"
blog http://edgehillherbfarmer.spaces.live.com/default.aspx?wa=wsignin1.0
happy farmgirl #89


Reply author: jpbluesky
Replied on: Feb 16 2009 05:37:16 AM
Message:



that somebody was me, and thank you Karen!

Farmgirl Sister # 31

www.blueskyjeannie.blogspot.com

Psalm 51: 10-13


Reply author: dkelewae
Replied on: Feb 16 2009 05:41:19 AM
Message:

Deni-Welcome to MJF from a fellow Missourian! Glad to have you here with us :)

Yay-Hubby got me a cast iron dutch skillet so now I can jump in on the MJF bread bandwagon!

Diana
Farmgirl Sister #272
St. Peters MO
Country Girl trapped in the city!

http://farmgirldreams.blogspot.com/


Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Feb 16 2009 07:05:53 AM
Message:

Well, months ago I tried MJ's recipe from her idea book and did not fare well at all! But I did not use organic flour so I finally found some. It is Hodgson Mill organic flour at Walmart of all places and I started my "Mother" yesterday afternoon about 3:00 p.m. I spent yesterday reading all 43 pages of this post and this time I will be using the right ingredients and having more patience! I am DETERMINED to have this work. Years ago I made starter in a mason jar with cheesecloth over it set outside in the summer and I used regular flour and had that starter for years but I don't remember the particulars anymore but when I saw Mary Jane's recipe I KNEW I wanted to get back to it. Thank you Julie, Ronna, Alee and Mary Jane and all of you for your posts...it is so inspiring to keep going until we are ALL successful which of course builds that confidence muscle which we can all use.
The recipes look fantastic and I will keep you updated on my progress too.
Shirley Jean...I think we started our starter on the same day so let's keep in touch! Good luck and happy, healthy bread-making to all!
P.S. Julie....I lived in Rockford for 13 years! Small world....and now I'm here in AR with y'all!

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: pearlgirl
Replied on: Feb 16 2009 07:14:22 AM
Message:

The beagles look wonderful! I would like to try them Julie, but your fractions all turned into question marks so I don't know how much of each ingredient to use. If you could re post them I would really appreciate it. Thanks so much, the pictures look beautiful.

Favour is deceitful, and beauty is vain: but a woman that feareth the LORD, she shall be praised. Give her of the fruit of her hands; and let her own works praise her in the gates.
Pro 31:30,31

http://pearlsgleanings.blogspot.com/
http://www.pearlgirl901.etsy.com/


Reply author: jpbluesky
Replied on: Feb 16 2009 07:23:35 AM
Message:

Day two for me - and I think I already see some mold forming on the sides of the bowl where the batter stayed after mixing it......but I added anyway, and will see tomorrow.....north Florida is highly famous for the ability to create mold.....we shall see! :)

Farmgirl Sister # 31

www.blueskyjeannie.blogspot.com

Psalm 51: 10-13


Reply author: K-Falls Farmgirl
Replied on: Feb 16 2009 07:26:40 AM
Message:

Deni, Welcome to our farmgirl site from Klamath falls Oregon. The bagels look delicious. I have posted this before but willsay it again..If your first batch doesnt turn out like you think it should , don't give up.. I have made several loaves and each one has gotten better. Follow MJ instructions and be patient.

Cheryl
Farmgirl #309


Almost daily posts at:
http://www.k-fallsfarmgirl.blogspot.com/
Come visit the barn at http://barndoorcreations.blogspot.com/

Every time I hear the dirty word 'exercise',
I wash my mouth out with chocolate.


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 16 2009 08:58:53 AM
Message:

Lydia - they look fine to me and I am on a different computer at work right now. Is anyone else having touble viewing the Bagel Recipe?

What browser are you using Lydia?

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Feb 16 2009 09:21:37 AM
Message:

Yes, I can't read it either, Julie. I use Firefox but can see it in Internet Explorer. I would suggest re-typing them in the forum so they don't form the fractions. That way all could read them.

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: chessie
Replied on: Feb 16 2009 09:22:07 AM
Message:

Julie, I can see the fractions clearly...


www.edgehillherbfarm.com "where the name is bigger than the farm, but no one seems to mind"
blog http://edgehillherbfarmer.spaces.live.com/default.aspx?wa=wsignin1.0
happy farmgirl #89


Reply author: Deni
Replied on: Feb 16 2009 09:32:36 AM
Message:

Good Morning, Farmgirls. After resting yesterday, my Mother smelled particularly sour this morning. I gave it a stir and added UNbleached organic white flour - no lightning did not strike me, so I guess it's okay to have in the house - and changed tea towels. I started getting a spot or two of pennicilin (sp?) last week. I just removed it with a towel. I figured better to take it out than let it blossom. As my Mother matures she seems to separate, leaving water on top with a lumpy dry crust of flour, just a skim of flour really. Is that what y'all are experiencing. The first week this did not happen. Have I screwed up my water to flour ratio?

I too am having trouble with fractions in the recipe. I use Firefox as well.

Think I'll spend a minute today getting acquainted with some other forums. Any suggestions from you True Blues'? I'll throw down some info about me in the intro section, and learn more about you. Looking forward to forming rewarding relationships here in farmgirl land.

sunshinedreamkitchen.blogspot.com


Reply author: pearlgirl
Replied on: Feb 16 2009 10:26:14 AM
Message:

I was using Firefox for my browser and sure enough, in Internet Explorer they all showed up fine. Thanks.

Favour is deceitful, and beauty is vain: but a woman that feareth the LORD, she shall be praised. Give her of the fruit of her hands; and let her own works praise her in the gates.
Pro 31:30,31

http://pearlsgleanings.blogspot.com/
http://www.pearlgirl901.etsy.com/


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 16 2009 10:43:46 AM
Message:

The problem is firefox. It supports a different font than IE does. I'll see if I can fix them. Those of you using Firefox let me know if it helps.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Feb 16 2009 11:09:51 AM
Message:

Much better! Thank you.

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Feb 16 2009 11:11:46 AM
Message:

Deni- the "water" floating on the top is actually called Hooch. It's an alcohol water that is a by product of the sourdough. You can either stir it back in or pour it off.

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: Gaelic Gardener
Replied on: Feb 16 2009 3:06:42 PM
Message:

How about if I pour my mother a beer and put it next to her on the counter so they can discuss yeast? Will she get bubbly then, do you think? I know I always get bubbly after I drink beer....
--Kelly ;)

“We can complain because rose bushes have thorns,
or rejoice because thorn bushes have roses.”
Abraham Lincoln


Reply author: gramax18
Replied on: Feb 16 2009 3:09:28 PM
Message:

Hi everyone. I have a question that I don't think has been asked sofar. I have made the farmhouse bread for 4 weeks and it is very tough. I don't mean the crust but the inside. Yes the crust has been hard until I found a plastic container to keep it to keep it fresh. The last loaf raised real well and the taste is good. I hope someone can help me.
Thanks

Elinor


Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Feb 16 2009 3:34:24 PM
Message:

Kelly.....what a GREAT idea about the beer! LOL! I had mine on top of the frig and decided to bring her down. I thought she might be lonely. I talk to my plants and anything living so I figured I better start talking to "Mother"....we'll see if it helps...she does seem to be a bit more "bubbly" now! Let me know how the beer companion works...I don't have any in the house right now so you'll have to do THAT research.
Good luck!

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: urban farm girl
Replied on: Feb 16 2009 4:22:49 PM
Message:

I sure like that idea too!!!


Reply author: nin1952
Replied on: Feb 16 2009 4:46:34 PM
Message:


Hi I'm new to this type of thing. Hope I'm not doing anything wrong.
I started "Mother" about three weeks ago. I've done everything it says to do down to the last letter and I just have not had any success. I may sound dumber than a rock, but maybe someone can answer a couple of questions. My starter has a thin layer of liquid on top when I uncover it. Should it? Is "Mother" supposed to be thin? It just won't rise. What am I doing wrong? Please help.


Reply author: K-Falls Farmgirl
Replied on: Feb 16 2009 5:01:34 PM
Message:

Hello Donna. Welcome. No questions are dumb ones. See the posts a few before yours,. The Liquid is called hooch it can be stirred back into the mother. Mother is not watery but like thick pancake batter. The bread dough when ready to raise is like a sticky ball, It will resemble the feel of a water balloon..pat it gently with a bit of flourand leave it covered maybe 8 hours. Be sure to bake it with a muffin tin of water. It needs the moisture while cooking. bake no hotter than 200 degrees internal temp. Sourdough will not rise like yeast kneaded bread. Keep trying it will get easier. My first loaf looked like foccaccia bread. each week the mother gets stronger and better...Check back a few pages on this thread Mary Jane gave some great advice.

Cheryl
Farmgirl #309


Almost daily posts at:
http://www.k-fallsfarmgirl.blogspot.com/
Come visit the barn at http://barndoorcreations.blogspot.com/

Every time I hear the dirty word 'exercise',
I wash my mouth out with chocolate.


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 16 2009 5:43:07 PM
Message:

Donna - the first week the starter will be fairly thick but will eventually thin out to be like batter. The liquid is normal and fine. I have not had much experience with my started itself rising. But I feed them at night and don't look at them during the day.

We are so glad you have joined us! No dumb questions. Go back and read this forum. There is so much good info.

Ladies I am working on a carrot cake recipe I will be sharing with you later in the week.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: urban farm girl
Replied on: Feb 16 2009 6:03:57 PM
Message:

Julie....you said you give the starter liquid every other day. I thought I would try that but it didn't get any of the bubbles so I added the liquid(purified water).
Donna I'm just where your at...but I am determined to succeed at this. Everyone is so helpful too... I really enjoy this!


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Feb 16 2009 6:04:31 PM
Message:

I have had to stir down my starter about 3 times today! I am waiting for a delivery of flour tomorrow so I can do some bread baking! Hurray!

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 16 2009 7:28:25 PM
Message:

Melissa I give my starter water EVERY day except it's rest day and then it doesnt get anything. I only wet my towel every other day. Perhaps I wasn't clear when I posted that. I was responding to someones question about how often to wet the towel.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: olive610
Replied on: Feb 16 2009 8:03:24 PM
Message:

Hello Farmgirls,

I have been off the message board for 2 days as I have been ill.

Deni, I just now read that you are new. You discovered Mary Janes Farm the same way I did by finding the magazine because of the Artisan bread on the cover.

Julie, I did make your pancake recipe and it was WONDERFUL! As soon as I mixed up the batter it got nice and bubbly right away. The pancakes turned out light and fluffy. My hubby loved them. Thanks so much for sharing that recipe with all of us. I will be making these all the time now.

See you all tomorrow.



"Life is a great big canvas, and you should throw all the paint on it you can." Danny Kaye


Reply author: antoinette
Replied on: Feb 16 2009 8:57:08 PM
Message:

Is anyone making any other kinds of bread with the sour dough other than the farmhouse white? If so would you mind sharing your recipe. Thanks Toni


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Feb 16 2009 10:04:09 PM
Message:

Toni- I shared the french bread recipe (I'll have to go find it- it is back about 3-4 pages) and that works really nicely. Any sour dough recipe should work well.

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: Suzan
Replied on: Feb 17 2009 09:51:35 AM
Message:

Success!! I mixed up the cinnamon raisin bread last evening and let it sit overnight, baked it this morning before work - it raised beautifully! I haven't had a chance to try it though as I was fasting for a dr appointmtent this morning...Can't wait until I get home!


Reply author: gardenmaam
Replied on: Feb 17 2009 11:34:37 AM
Message:

RONNA~ Thanks for sharing the recipe! I had success with the San Francisco "style" french bread recipe. The small round loaves turned out just PERECT! The texture and taste were both great. The loaves worked well to use for soup "bowls". Just cut a bit off the top then scooped out much of the middle leaving a bowl shape...filled with hot chowder. Topped each filled "bowl" with the cut off portion of the loaf. Everyone liked it alot. Next time I will make 5 rounds out of the batch so they are just a little smaller.

Alee~ The recipe that Ronna posted should be on page 13 of this topic dated Jan. 22.


Reply author: FarmGirl~K
Replied on: Feb 17 2009 11:37:27 AM
Message:

Thanks Julie for the bagel recipe. I started my mother again on Sunday. I think the bagels will be a good recipe to try for my first bake since so many have had troubles with theirs. Can't wait to try them. I have never made bagels before either. :)

"I have an irrepressible desire to live till I can be assured that the world is a little better for my having lived in it."
– Abraham Lincoln


Reply author: gardenmaam
Replied on: Feb 17 2009 11:40:24 AM
Message:

Elinor~ My Farm House white has been tough too on the outside. The first week was very dense and short.
Second week used a loaf pan and it had a better rise but still very crunchy on top. But the inside was more like a dense french bread.
This last time I used the San Francisco french recipe posted on pg. 13 and it was great. I wrote about this loaf here just a moment ago.
Next week I wil try the Farmhouse white again and see what happens.

quote:
Originally posted by gramax18

Hi everyone. I have a question that I don't think has been asked sofar. I have made the farmhouse bread for 4 weeks and it is very tough. I don't mean the crust but the inside. Yes the crust has been hard until I found a plastic container to keep it to keep it fresh. The last loaf raised real well and the taste is good. I hope someone can help me.
Thanks

Elinor


Reply author: strawberyarn
Replied on: Feb 17 2009 11:57:32 AM
Message:

FINALLY SUCCESS this is my third loaf. My first two were bricks with no rise. But this week the bread rose. I did nothing different mine just took longer. Why? don't know, don't care. Is it because my house is colder and I live at 7000 elevation. Could be. Just stick with it it works. In the third week the mother really bcame active more bubbles etc. I have not checked this post for about a week so now I cannot wait to try the pizzas and the bagels which both look wonderful. Thanks to you all for support pictures and knowledge because without this I would have chucked this project after week one. Christine


Reply author: Ronna
Replied on: Feb 17 2009 12:49:43 PM
Message:

I'm going to share a good sourdough English Muffin recipe.
Was adapted from a King Arthur recipe, not by me. Enjoy!
The more you use your starter, you'll realize how versatile
and tasty it is.
Ronna

1 cup sourdough starter
1 ½ cups milk
5 1/2 to 6 cups flour
1 T sugar
1 T sea salt
1 tsp baking soda

To make sponge: In a ceramic or glass bowl, mix starter, milk and 5 cups of flour. Cover with plastic wrap, and let sit UNREFRIGERATED for 7-24 hours.

To make dough: Mix sugar, salt, baking soda and ½ cup flour, kneading into the sponge – it will be too thick to stir – no more than 2 minutes. Cover with plastic wrap, letting it rest for an hour. (There’s still ½-cup remaining flour. Some of it can be added in if this dough feels too sticky. You want a dough that resembles a good biscuit dough – not too sticky, not too dry.

Kneading & Shaping: Lightly flour your kneading board and hands – dough will be “soft”. Knead for only 2-3 minutes, just until the dough is smooth, no longer lumpy. Roll it out between ¼ and ½-inch thickness.

Cut out 3 to 4-inch diameter circles. Place on a cornmeal sprinkled cookie sheet, letting rest for at least 15-minutes, but 30 is better. Note: I didn’t use cornmeal as I don’t care for the flavor. Ronna's notes..use Semolina flour, not so crunchy on the teeth and yet gives a bit of texture. Great for pizza too. Use a large biscuit cutter, if it's smaller than 3-4", that's okay. They'll bake/cook a bit faster and you'll have more of them to enjoy. Special EM cutters/forms are not needed. Specific type of flour (bread or all purpose) was not specified when the recipe was adapted, use what you have and they should be fine.

There are two cooking methods – either works well.

1. Stove top: Heat a lightly greased skillet, using a very low flame. I used ghee. Place cornmeal side down in the warmed skillet, cooking slowly for 10-minutes. Flip, cooking other side for another 10-minutes. Check for a light-brown color. Poke the sides to see if they’re cooked – not gooey.

2. Oven: Heat oven to 425-degrees. Place dough rounds on cornmeal dusted cookie sheet. Bake 8-10 minutes. Check bottom side for light brown coloration. Flip rounds over, cooking 6-8 minutes on the other side.

I tested both methods and preferred the oven method. The outside was more crispy, the inside more “fluffy” and light in texture, given the greater amount of heat that expanded the dough. Having said that, the skillet method resulted in English Muffins that were still superior to any store-bought.



Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Feb 17 2009 1:23:24 PM
Message:

Oh! I LOVE English muffins! Thank you for the recipe, Ronna! My Mother is only 3 days old and the first time I bake I am making your San Francisco recipe or Julies pancakes and then the next week I'll venture further. This is day 3 and I have a dry thin cotton towel over it and there is quite a crust on it. Is it alright to wet the towel with purified water now? There are big chunks of crust in my starter now. MJ says to not wet the towel until the 2nd week but maybe since it is winter makes it dry out faster? Advice appreciated!

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: nancylee
Replied on: Feb 17 2009 1:29:35 PM
Message:

nancy

quote:
Originally posted by willowtreecreek

Nancy - I don't really know anything about elevation. Maybe someone else can chime in on that. How old is your starter? Are you feeding it everyday and are you seeing bubbles on it after feeding? What type of water are you using?

Also - personally I was not a big fan of the KA Bread flour for making bread. I would suggest you use the KA All purpose flour if it is available in your area. The bread flour seemed very doughy even after a good rise and baking to 200.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com



Reply author: Ronna
Replied on: Feb 17 2009 1:39:58 PM
Message:

Nancy, elevation should not make a difference for your starter. I'm at nearly 5000 ft here. Bread does not require the exact measurements of a cake or quick bread for rising. I really don't think it's of importance. We have ladies at nearly sea level in SoCal and those in the Rocky Mountains of CO using sourdough and have not heard or read of any problems.


Reply author: gardenmaam
Replied on: Feb 17 2009 8:11:31 PM
Message:

Ronna - What is the approximate yield on the English Muffin recipe?
Cathy


Reply author: Quintessential Kate
Replied on: Feb 18 2009 05:08:33 AM
Message:

Sandra,
The dry towel allows the little "yeasties" to get through and permeate your starter. If you're home during the day I would suggest maybe stirring it every then and again as you pass through the kitchen. I have the opposite problem....I live in a very HUMID climate right now and my "Ma" is over a month old and I very seldom have a "crust" on her. I probably wet her towel about 2-3 times during the week. But part of that is that we really like the "sour".
Hang in there for this first week so you can capture all the available yeast you need.
That's just my 2 cents worth......
Good luck!
Ciao, Kate

Heart of Texas
Chapter
AKA: Hot Farmgirl #234
http://quintessentialkate.blogspot.com

Today is my best day!


Reply author: Quintessential Kate
Replied on: Feb 18 2009 05:14:46 AM
Message:

Ronna,
Thanks for posting the English Muffin recipe......which will be my next venture. Tell me, have you ever frozen them once they are made? We are a tribe of two.....and most recipes make way more than we can eat. BUT....when I get a new recipe I always follow the recipe to the nth degree the first time around. If I get good results the first time around then I can cut it back some the next time I make it.
Thanks again for your wonderful recipes!! I have been having such a good time making different breads....and taking care of "Ma".
Ciao, Kate

Heart of Texas
Chapter
AKA: Hot Farmgirl #234
http://quintessentialkate.blogspot.com

Today is my best day!


Reply author: kristin sherrill
Replied on: Feb 18 2009 06:40:25 AM
Message:

Hey Julie, I am making the pancakes this morning and I knew I should have halfed the recipe. So I have a lot left over. Can I keep it in the fridge and if so how long will it last in there??

Thanks. Kris

Turn your face to the sun and the shadows fall behind you. Maori proverb


Reply author: olive610
Replied on: Feb 18 2009 06:55:31 AM
Message:

Kristin,

I made the full recipe too and it's just me and my hubby. I just cooked up the pancakes and let them all cool on a wire rack. Then I wrapped them in batches of 4 and put them in the freezer. When I want pancakes in the morning I take them out, defrost them and warm them in the oven. They are just as good and when I am in a rush they come in so handy.

"Life is a great big canvas, and you should throw all the paint on it you can." Danny Kaye


Reply author: DeepsouthMamma
Replied on: Feb 18 2009 07:06:18 AM
Message:

Hey, just popping in to comment on the English Muffin recipe-
I made them yesterday and they were fantastic. It was a different recipe than Ronna posted,I think, but similar-this is the one I used(just so you can compare for yield)

http://webpages.charter.net/rhamley/bread/engmuffins.htm

They freeze and reheat perfectly! This recipe made 11(large biscuit cutter)
They looked the same size as reg store bought ones-just a hundred times better tasting!!!!



Blessings,
Autumn
Farmgirl #49
http://simplytoday-autumn.blogspot.com/

Isaiah 40:31
But they that wait upon the LORD shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings as eagles; they shall run, and not be weary; and they shall walk, and not faint.


Reply author: kristin sherrill
Replied on: Feb 18 2009 07:07:22 AM
Message:

Well, what a good idea, Mary-Alice. I will have to do that now. Thanks.

Kris

Turn your face to the sun and the shadows fall behind you. Maori proverb


Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Feb 18 2009 07:19:30 AM
Message:

Kate...thanks for your advice....when I went to stir yesterday...no more crust and lots more "hooch"...I fed her and then checked a couple hours later and getting lots of bubbles and that yeasty smell I love! I can't wait for Sunday! I'm going to make Ronna's San Francisco French bread for starters....get it...starters...I crack myself up! Have a great day everyone and don't forget to Love Your Mother!

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 18 2009 08:00:14 AM
Message:

Kristin it is a lot of batter. I made them all and fed the leftovers to our dogs and chickens. I wasn't sure how it would hold up in the fridge. I will try it next time we make them.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: pearlgirl
Replied on: Feb 18 2009 08:07:10 AM
Message:

I made Julie's pancakes yesterday and they were still wonderful today after being refrigerated. I think there are still some in the fridge for tomorrow. I made 2/3 the recipe and it has fed 3 of us for two breakfasts.

Favour is deceitful, and beauty is vain: but a woman that feareth the LORD, she shall be praised. Give her of the fruit of her hands; and let her own works praise her in the gates.
Pro 31:30,31

http://pearlsgleanings.blogspot.com/
http://www.pearlgirl901.etsy.com/


Reply author: EarthKind
Replied on: Feb 18 2009 3:08:47 PM
Message:

Hi Gals! Here's a photo of Ronna's delicious French Bread recipe. It was so good, I'm making more today! It came out great the first time and my mother was only about a week and a half old. I might try the English Muffin recipe next, it sounds really good. I like the sour too, and made a post about it earlier this week. It's under Sour?+ photos thread, I guess I should have posted it over here. Somebody mentioned that the larger the mother, the more likely it is to be sour and that keeping the towl wet helps. I've been doing that and my mother is definately getting more sour and fragrant too!


Angel

Farmgirl Sister #481


Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Feb 18 2009 5:57:29 PM
Message:

Angel...your bread is gorgeous!!!! That's the recipe I am going to use this Sunday when my "MOM" will be a week old! YES!!!! Can't wait....I've been drooling over the pics and descriptions all week! Thanks for sharing!

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: K-Falls Farmgirl
Replied on: Feb 18 2009 6:11:27 PM
Message:

That bread looks wonderful Angel.
Kris, The pancakes freeze wonderfully, I made them last Friday and froze the extra's. I only used 1 cup of the "mother"starter and had 4 pancakes left over DH & I both had our fill. I always freese them after I make them & let them cool. Just like Mary-Alice (Olive610)said. wrap & freeze what you don't eat. reheat & eat!

Cheryl
Farmgirl #309


Almost daily posts at:
http://www.k-fallsfarmgirl.blogspot.com/
Come visit the barn at http://barndoorcreations.blogspot.com/

Every time I hear the dirty word 'exercise',
I wash my mouth out with chocolate.


Reply author: acairnsmom
Replied on: Feb 18 2009 9:00:58 PM
Message:

Thanks for all you who have taken the plunge and worked out the kinks for the rest of us. I'm jumping on the band er bread wagon and I'm proud to announce that "Ruby" was born at 4:39 this afternoon. She's named after my Grandmother who more than likely made her own sourdough. I was going to name her after my late mother when I realized Mom wouldn't be caught dead making her own bread (I'm apparently a throw back). Wish me luck! Looking forward to pancakes next Tuesday.

Audrey

Toto, we're not in Kansas any more!


Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Feb 19 2009 06:27:03 AM
Message:

Audrey...you GO Girlfriend! I am still just calling mine "MOM"...I guess I should name her after my mother but she didn't have a lot of time for hanging out in the kitchen! Although after she retired she did start making bread but mostly French bread but that counts for sure so I guess I will officially announce here that my Mother is "Lizzie"! In memory of my REAL Mother who always tried to "do it all"! I hope my starter does half as well!

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 19 2009 08:11:00 AM
Message:

Glad to hear you all are having some great success. Keep the pictures coming! I think they are a great motivator.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Gaelic Gardener
Replied on: Feb 19 2009 08:11:23 AM
Message:

This just in from Health magazine:

" A 2008 study from researchers at the University of Massachusetts Medical School showed that people with type 2 diabetes who followed a low-glycemic index (GI) diet lost weight and reduced blood sugar."

"Not all whole-wheat bread is low-GI, but real sourdough bread is because of the acidity of the dough."
So eat up!
--Kelly


“We can complain because rose bushes have thorns,
or rejoice because thorn bushes have roses.”
Abraham Lincoln


Reply author: janiee
Replied on: Feb 19 2009 08:17:48 AM
Message:

THANK YOU!Kelly for posting that information! I went to a dietician yesterday for my diabetes and she tried to tell me that I have to give up my sourdough bread (from Ethel-husbands grandmother's name) and I was searching the threads this morning to see if she was right or not! Yipee! I can still do my baking and have yummy bread!!!!! dancing in the kitchen.....:)
janiee
farmgirl #390


Reply author: Farmers Daughter
Replied on: Feb 19 2009 08:48:10 AM
Message:

Well my mother has been going since Monday. Kind of off the schedule, but it took me a little time to find organic flour. She is doing "OK" not a lot of bubble action. House is on the cool side. I seen the post about maybe stirring it more often to stop the crust from forming and yesterday I did it 3 time. It really made a difference. Seems like it made her bubble more. I don't know if the crust was keeping her from breathing? I just blamed the lack of bubbling action on the cool, might be both.
I want to thank all of you ladies for the great post and tips. It took me several days to get through all the pages. My husband kept wondering what I so interested in on the computer. I have learned so much and am enjoy this whole process to sour dough bread.
Thanks to all you gals. Can't wait till the next venture. Did I read something about making cheese in the next magazine? oh boy!


Reply author: gspringman
Replied on: Feb 19 2009 3:03:10 PM
Message:

I made my first MJ bread today. I only found organic wheat flour when I was given the starter from kfalls farmgirl last week. It looks real pretty in the new cast iron pan I bought. I just tasted it and it tastes pretty good too although I think I added too much salt. My eyes were'nt quite awake this morning when I put it together. Will have to look around for organic white flour next time and make sure I read the salt portion better.

Gail
Farmgirl #486


Reply author: LoraFLeming
Replied on: Feb 19 2009 4:49:09 PM
Message:

Success! Week two my bread turned out perfectly! It was delicious and Sat is now going to be my favorite day ... fresh bread! YUM!! If you'd like to see pictures of my first two weeks and a video go to my blog ... http://loralynn7.blogspot.com /font id= blue " target="_blank"> font color= blue http://loralynn7.blogspot.com /font id= blue


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 19 2009 6:28:04 PM
Message:

Sourdough Carrot Cake
2 - large carrots, grated to equal 1 cup
1/4 cup butter
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 egg
dash of salt
1/4tsp. ground nutmeg
1/4 tsp. allspice
1/2tsp. ground cinnamon
2 tsp. baking soda
1 cup starter
1/4 cup of milk
1 1/2 cups flour
1/2 cup raisins and/or 1/2 cup chopped walnuts (optional)
In a small saucepan add carrots and just enough water to cover. Simmer 20 minutes until carrots are tender.
In a large bowl cream together butter and sugars. Add one egg and beat until smooth. Add salt, spices and baking soda and mix well.
In a separate bowl combine starter, milk, flour and the carrots plus their cooking liquid(to make 1 cup total). Mix to combine and add nuts and raisins if desired. Add to the butter and sugar mixture and stir until well combined. Pour batter into a prepared 13x9 inch pan and bake at 350 about 40 minutes or until it tests done.
Cool and serve. Top with cream cheese frosting if desired.

Cream Cheese Frosting
(If making a layer cake, double this recipe)
1 – 8oz package of cream cheese
1/4 cup butter, softened
1 cup powdered sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
In a large bowl use a blender to cream together all ingredients.















Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: gspringman
Replied on: Feb 19 2009 6:33:54 PM
Message:

Julie, your carrot cake recipe looks great. Can't wait to try it.
Thanks

Gail
Farmgirl #486


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 19 2009 6:59:54 PM
Message:

Thanks Gail. I forgot to mention that is was absolutly delicious! I am taking the rest to a pot luck at school(work) tomorrow. If I keep eating everything I make I will gain 100 pounds!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: urban farm girl
Replied on: Feb 19 2009 7:02:40 PM
Message:

That is sooo cool Julie...your cake looks fabulous ! You and the others have shared such awesome recipes!


Reply author: acairnsmom
Replied on: Feb 19 2009 9:18:13 PM
Message:

Oh man! That carrot cake looks fabulous. Come on Ruby! You've got work to do mother! Don't know if I can wail until next week to give her a try...bread, cake pancakes, I don't know if I've made enough! And yes, all the pictures are great motivators (that's why I jumped in on this!).

Audrey

Toto, we're not in Kansas any more!


Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Feb 20 2009 06:59:19 AM
Message:

Okay....I admit it...I was drooling over that carrot cake! You are great, Julie, to make all these things and share your recipes with us! It is truly motivating and salivating! Thanks so much!

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: kristin sherrill
Replied on: Feb 20 2009 07:14:48 AM
Message:

Hey ya'll. I googled "health benefits of sour dough bread" last night and got all kinds of good info there. I don't know if anyone else has done this yet. But there is a site about diabetes and sour dough.

Just thought I'd mention this. Kris

And the cake recipe looks good. Thanks, Julie.

Turn your face to the sun and the shadows fall behind you. Maori proverb


Reply author: Deni
Replied on: Feb 20 2009 07:31:45 AM
Message:

Good Morning, Ladies! You and your "Mom's" are doing fabulous work. I'm collecting the recipes, but also trying to lose a few pounds ;-)

So, here's my question, When you take a cup of Mother out midweek to make a cake or pancakes, etc, do you just add back a cup plus the daily 1/3 cup? How often can you do this before Mother gets upset - that is, doesn't have time enough to sour-up? Or did you just double the batch at the beginning so now there's plenty. I started with the amounts given in the magazine article and am only doing the 1/3 cup add.

Thanks for helping out, and for your continued dedication to my education.

Deni

A house in the country is not the same as a country house. Gertrude Stein (1874 - 1946)

sunshinedreamkitchen.blogspot.com


Reply author: janiee
Replied on: Feb 20 2009 07:41:06 AM
Message:

Julie, your cake is awesome! can't wait to make one for my mom (her favorite of all) .thanks for sharing!
janiee
farmgirl #390


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 20 2009 07:59:51 AM
Message:

Deni If I take some out mid week I just double up for the next few days. However, several of the recipes I have posted only require 1 cup of starter, so if you plan to make 2 recipes in the week that only need 1 cup you really dont need to "make up" for any.

Thanks everyone for your compliments on the cake!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: EarthKind
Replied on: Feb 20 2009 10:01:07 AM
Message:

Well, I had it all planned out that Saturday was going to be English Muffin day and then midweek I'll be making loaves again.... but now I've seen these carrot cake photos (and I LOVE carrot cake), I've got a real problem on my hands!

Deni, I had to double the size of my mother to accomodate 2 baking days a week. So after week one and the first "rest" day, I started adding 2/3 C flour and 1/2 c water. So far it's working well. I'm in the 3 week now.

If everyone keeps adding such yummy recipes and photos, I'll have to move my mother to the tub!!

Farmgirl Sister #481


Reply author: vicki Cothren
Replied on: Feb 20 2009 12:21:44 PM
Message:

After 5 weeks of experimenting with pans, I finely have good starter and bread. My house is old and usually on the cold side even though I live in So. Cal. so I ended up using a heating pad on low to help the bread rise. My question is, I need because of economics, find a less inexpensive flour - I have been using King Arthur unbleached all-purpose flour,at a little over $4.00 for 5lbs up to now. Has anyone tried other flour brands and what was your results? I did see that Mary Jane did make arrangements with a company for her customers, but never heard who or how much. Gold Metal unbleach all purpose at Winco in our area is around $2.00 - has any one tried that. We have truely enjoyed our bread and this website. Blessings - Vicki


Reply author: pearlgirl
Replied on: Feb 20 2009 12:30:00 PM
Message:

Vicki,
I have been using whatever unbleached flour or wheat flour I have on hand (which is either store brand or gold medal) to make my bread and they work fine. I do use organic unbleached flour though to feed my starter since I don't want any chemicals building up in there that could kill it.

Favour is deceitful, and beauty is vain: but a woman that feareth the LORD, she shall be praised. Give her of the fruit of her hands; and let her own works praise her in the gates.
Pro 31:30,31

http://pearlsgleanings.blogspot.com/
http://www.pearlgirl901.etsy.com/


Reply author: jpbluesky
Replied on: Feb 20 2009 12:34:48 PM
Message:

tomorrow is rise and bake day! Both my daughter's and my batter is bubbly, and a little "ripe" smelling, and so now we get to see if the baking is successful! I just love looking at the bowl on the counter, that has been a pleasure all to itself so far!

Farmgirl Sister # 31

www.blueskyjeannie.blogspot.com

Psalm 51: 10-13


Reply author: vicki Cothren
Replied on: Feb 20 2009 1:08:55 PM
Message:

Thank-you pearlgirl, for the prompt feed back - Vicki


Reply author: urban farm girl
Replied on: Feb 20 2009 1:22:12 PM
Message:

Well..... there is definately something wrong with my starter....my fourth try and this morning at 4:30 I mixed two cups of starter with the 1 1/2 cups of flour little salt and honey put it in the cast iron pot and this afternoon when I came home from work 3:00 no rise...nothing. I sure don't get it. I just can't figure it out.


Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Feb 20 2009 1:42:29 PM
Message:

Vicki, MJ's organic flour was like $7.95 I think for 5 lbs. and free shipping but it was only offered to "sisterhood" members I think and there was a limit of 5 bags/boxes. I ordered it but I didn't have it when I started my "Lizzie"...my starters name. I found Hodgson's Mill organic white flour at Walmart for about $2.00 for 4 or 5 lbs. so I used that. It seems to be working fine but then again I haven't made anything with my starter yet. Tomorrow is my first day baking! I can't wait but I am making the San Francisco french bread recipe the first time as was posted earlier. I will wait until week #3 to try the farmhouse recipe.
Good luck!
Melissa - have you tried that San FRancisco french bread recipe from Ronna here on this thread? LOts of the gals who had no success with MJ's recipe the firs few times tried that one and it worked until weeks later when their sourdough got much stronger. They had great success with Ronna's recipe, you might want to try that. Is your starter bubbly and smelly?
Are you using a wooden spoon? Organic white flour? The first time I tried anf failed I had used regular flour and tap water, not purified and it made ALL the difference in the world! Hope this helps. Have you read all the posts? There are lots of hints and tips throughout this entire thread!
Good Luck!

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: Deni
Replied on: Feb 20 2009 1:50:51 PM
Message:

Melissa - I had the same thing happen last Saturday. I fixed it by applying heat. I heated the top of my cast iron pot on the stove top over a gas burner until it was fairly warm. Then I turned off the burner, put the pot on it, the lid on the pot, AND turned on the oven. Then I got a RiSe out of it in a couple of hours time.

I also think I'll try a little more honey tomorrow when I bake my next straight up Artisan loaf. My sourdough is sooo sour, and is some honey helps the rise, won't more honey help more? Hopefully . . .

A house in the country is not the same as a country house. Gertrude Stein (1874 - 1946)

sunshinedreamkitchen.blogspot.com


Reply author: urban farm girl
Replied on: Feb 20 2009 2:07:51 PM
Message:

Sandra and Deni..... I have used the organic flour and purified water wooden spoon and ceramic bowl...it's bubbly and smell sour...I just feel disappointed....I will give the S.F. french recipe a try. Thanks girls.


Reply author: Deni
Replied on: Feb 20 2009 2:16:30 PM
Message:

On the discussion of flours -- I've been using unnamed bulk flours from my semi-urban health food store. The organic flours are about $1.50 lb. I'm going to check with the local food buying club and see what it costs to buy in bulk. My experience with organic flour in large quantities is that it's best to freeze it because beasties like to infiltrate - or some actually come in the flour - and freezing keeps them from hatching and ruining the precious stuff. I don't have a deep freeze unit at the moment, but have hope for the future. We're fixing up a utility room for our washer/dryer and sewing!!! If you have grocers that carry bulk food you might check with them. They may be willing to help you out. Or a local baker friend of mine will split orders with me when she gets a 25 lb. bag.

A house in the country is not the same as a country house. Gertrude Stein (1874 - 1946)

sunshinedreamkitchen.blogspot.com


Reply author: jpbluesky
Replied on: Feb 20 2009 2:18:46 PM
Message:

baking bread is a mysterious thing......this I have learned in the past. I have wondered for weeks why it does not work and then all of a sudden it does, and I wonder what made the difference. Do not get discouraged.....keep trying other things.

Farmgirl Sister # 31

www.blueskyjeannie.blogspot.com

Psalm 51: 10-13


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 20 2009 2:59:04 PM
Message:

Melissa I wish I had an answer for you! If you are getting a bubbling starter I don't understand why it wouldn't rise unless it is just too cold in your house. Perhaps you will have better luck once the weather warms up.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: K-Falls Farmgirl
Replied on: Feb 20 2009 3:08:38 PM
Message:

My bake day is tomorrow and I can't wait. "Mona".. My name for my starter is getting really good. She will provide the makings for two good size, loaves one I will take to my SIL Sunday..a surprise for her. Hope she likes the bread.. All I can say is Keep trying ladies, Each week my "mona" gets more sour.. & we love her so much..As shirley said don't get discouraged...


Cheryl
Farmgirl #309


Almost daily posts at:
http://www.k-fallsfarmgirl.blogspot.com/
Come visit the barn at http://barndoorcreations.blogspot.com/

Every time I hear the dirty word 'exercise',
I wash my mouth out with chocolate.


Reply author: chessie
Replied on: Feb 20 2009 7:15:40 PM
Message:

well, this is so not MaryJaneLike- (am a tad chagrined to admit this) I used electricity and I made a bread machine sourdough loaf today. I used Richard Langer's recipe from The Bread Machine bakery Book c. 1991
I didn't make his All-Sour Sourdough recipe because I was experimenting with MJ's starter verses the one he makes which uses milk. So I made this recipe instead and used the express or rapid setting. I know it uses yeast and oil, but for a quick loaf, the sour flavor is very tasty. Will make this again. I will definitely keep experimenting with the "mother and machine".

WHITE SOURDOUGH BREAD
2 cups MaryJane starter
1 tablespoon honey
2 tablespoons olive oil
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
1 3/4 c organic flour
1 teaspoon yeast
~put all ingredients into the bread machine pan fitted with the paddle in the order listed and select the rapid setting.

www.edgehillherbfarm.com "where the name is bigger than the farm, but no one seems to mind"
blog http://edgehillherbfarmer.spaces.live.com/default.aspx?wa=wsignin1.0
happy farmgirl #89


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 20 2009 8:09:43 PM
Message:

Thanks for sharing this Karen. I donthave a bread machine but I know many do. I'm sure this recipe will be helpful!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: boonedesigns
Replied on: Feb 21 2009 07:17:39 AM
Message:

I had a good started I thought.

Then a week and 1/2 ago I got the flu. I completely ignored the starter never feeding it or baking bread. Now I am not sure if it is just me but it has a really really strong odor. It still bubbles when i feed it but I am afraid it has gone bad.

Should I pitch it and start over????

I don't want it to make me sick or anything if I use it to bake bread. Will it?



Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life. ~Confucius

Sandy Boone Murals, Illustration & Graphic Design
www.BooneDesigns.com


Reply author: boonedesigns
Replied on: Feb 21 2009 07:20:33 AM
Message:

I should add it sticks so much it smelling up the kitchen and my husband thought something was dying.

Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life. ~Confucius

Sandy Boone Murals, Illustration & Graphic Design
www.BooneDesigns.com


Reply author: olive610
Replied on: Feb 21 2009 07:36:49 AM
Message:

Sandy,

If it stinks up the kitchen that much that your husband made a comment about it, you should play it safe and ditch it. Start over. You don't want to take a chance and get sick. It's only flour and water so just ditch it.

Hope you are feeling much better from your bout with the flu. That can really knock the stuffing right out of you!



"Life is a great big canvas, and you should throw all the paint on it you can." Danny Kaye


Reply author: olive610
Replied on: Feb 21 2009 07:38:48 AM
Message:

Oh, I forgot to tell you all that I have my loaf rising now. It's all cozy in it's cast iron pot and rising. I put it in the oven to keep drafts away from it. I also have the oven light on to add a little warmth in there.

We should have a nice loaf to eat with our dinner tonight. It gets better and better with each passing week.

"Life is a great big canvas, and you should throw all the paint on it you can." Danny Kaye


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 21 2009 07:53:11 AM
Message:

Sandy - it should smell yeasty or vinegary. If it smells like sweaty gym socks or very unpleasant you probably should toss it. For future reference you can cover it in plastic wrap and store it in the fridge if you are going to be away from it for a few days up to a few weeks. Longer than that and you can store it in the freezer. Just bring it to room temperature before feeding it again and you can continue like normal.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: jpbluesky
Replied on: Feb 21 2009 08:57:00 AM
Message:

Mine is in the oven with the light on, and I keep looking through the glass to see if it is rising.....I can't tell. It has been in there almost four hours now. Smells sour. I also saw on my parchment paper box not to use it for over 400 degree ovens. And our recipe calls for 425. But I used the paper, and I hope it does not burn or anything. Will let you know!

Farmgirl Sister # 31

www.blueskyjeannie.blogspot.com

Psalm 51: 10-13


Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Feb 21 2009 09:58:08 AM
Message:

Okay...I was going to make the San FRancisco french bread but changed my mind this morning and made Julie's pancakes instead....DELISH!!!!! I am freezing the rest after cooking them. Next week the French style bread.
Ahhh.....I think it's time for a nap now. Thanks everyone!

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: Ronna
Replied on: Feb 21 2009 12:07:20 PM
Message:

Just a thought on those who want to use the bread machine for MaryJane's recipe, which needs a long rise time before baking. From more than a few reports on several sourdough baking forums, sourdough has been known to corrode/remove the non stick finish on the bread pans.


Reply author: FarmGirl~K
Replied on: Feb 21 2009 1:53:13 PM
Message:

This morning I made Julie's pancakes as well. They were a huge hit. Normally when I make pancakes we use an IHOP copycat recipe. My DH loved them & said they were better. Also my kids too. Was so glad to see he enjoyed them after being a little nervous to eat something that had been sitting on the counter all week. We won't be making IHOp pancakes any longer. Thanks for the recipe.

"I have an irrepressible desire to live till I can be assured that the world is a little better for my having lived in it."
– Abraham Lincoln


Reply author: chessie
Replied on: Feb 21 2009 2:09:23 PM
Message:

Thanks Ronna for Bread machine caution. I think the rapid method is probably the only way to go if you are going to bake in the machine but I think i will try to use the dough setting for rolls and such and then raise the dough elsewhere.

Shirley Jean, parchment paper can "burn", more like singe really... at extremely high temps but only any exposed edges. You are fine. I have not had parchement burn at 425 degrees- ever! and i use it all the time. I have had it start to brown at 475 and singe at 500 when i make pizza on the stone. Hasn't hurt at thing as far as i can tell.

www.edgehillherbfarm.com "where the name is bigger than the farm, but no one seems to mind"
blog http://edgehillherbfarmer.spaces.live.com/default.aspx?wa=wsignin1.0
happy farmgirl #89


Reply author: chessie
Replied on: Feb 21 2009 3:06:50 PM
Message:

FYI- for those of you with "too sour" issues, i just read that some people put a pinch of baking soda in a "too sour"dough to temper/sweeten the sour. Anyone tried this?

www.edgehillherbfarm.com "where the name is bigger than the farm, but no one seems to mind"
blog http://edgehillherbfarmer.spaces.live.com/default.aspx?wa=wsignin1.0
happy farmgirl #89


Reply author: kristin sherrill
Replied on: Feb 21 2009 5:07:01 PM
Message:

I have had good luck with my dough rising nice and quick when I put it under my bathroom sink with a lamp on. It's nice and warm under there undisturbed and does a great job. That's the only place I rise mine now.

And when I made pancakes Wed. and had lots of the batter left over, i just put it in the fridge. It does not last more that a day or 2 that way. Next time I will cook them all and freeze them. It smells bad now.

That cake looks so good.

Kris

Turn your face to the sun and the shadows fall behind you. Maori proverb


Reply author: jpbluesky
Replied on: Feb 21 2009 5:19:36 PM
Message:

My daughter and I baked our bread at the same time in the same oven. That was interesting. I used a cast iron loaf pan, and she used a crockery pampered chef loaf pan. Mine came out looking almost like whole wheat, and did not raise a lot but cooked nicely and tasted good, but definitely sour. Hers came out lighter in color but heavier in consistency, and tasted sweeter than mine! Hers took longer to get to the desired temp. We had both used the same products, and done the same things each day......but both were yummy good! Butso different!

Farmgirl Sister # 31

www.blueskyjeannie.blogspot.com

Psalm 51: 10-13


Reply author: K-Falls Farmgirl
Replied on: Feb 21 2009 5:23:31 PM
Message:

Ready for the oven I made two loaves today and have them ready to bake in Glass pans..I will post the finished loaves when they are done. I really like the sour taste & we will have it for dinner.

Cheryl
Farmgirl #309


Almost daily posts at:
http://www.k-fallsfarmgirl.blogspot.com/
Come visit the barn at http://barndoorcreations.blogspot.com/

Every time I hear the dirty word 'exercise',
I wash my mouth out with chocolate.


Reply author: K-Falls Farmgirl
Replied on: Feb 21 2009 6:13:30 PM
Message:

Here it is... Beautiful

Cheryl
Farmgirl #309


Almost daily posts at:
http://www.k-fallsfarmgirl.blogspot.com/
Come visit the barn at http://barndoorcreations.blogspot.com/

Every time I hear the dirty word 'exercise',
I wash my mouth out with chocolate.


Reply author: JessieMae
Replied on: Feb 21 2009 6:16:02 PM
Message:

For those of you who are discouraged by your loaves, this is what mine looked like last week (my mother's first batch):

It didn't raise AT ALL. (The photo is after baking.)
This is the photo from today:

I have been using King Arthur Organic Flour - to start my mother, to feed her, and to make the bread this morning - and distilled water from a gallon jug I bought at the store. I followed the MJ Mag instructions to the letter; it just took two weeks instead of one to get going. I baked this week's loaf in a Le Cruset ceramic loaf pan. I let it rise on the top of our cast-iron radiator for about 3 hours. It took about 35 minutes to reach 200 degrees internally.


Reply author: Pearlsnjeans
Replied on: Feb 21 2009 6:19:57 PM
Message:

This morning I tried Karen's bread machine recipe. It was quick and easy. This made about a 1-pound loaf in my machine and it turned out very nice. I had a slice warm with homemade stew! Yum!!

Vicki
Farmgirl Sister #120
Today well lived makes every yesterday a memory of happiness and every tomorrow a vision of hope.


Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Feb 21 2009 6:29:44 PM
Message:

Well...after eating the pancakes this morning that were SO GOOD I vacuum packed the rest (2 to a pack) since it's just me, myself, and I. I left 2 out to have tonight after supper for dessert. I had this Danish imported Cherry Dessert that is like cherry pie filling minus all the sugars but yet not too sour. I had the two pancakes with the cherries on top and then I spinkled some powdered sugar on them...OMG!!!! SO GOOD and I wonder why I can't lose any weight! Ha! Ha! But actually it was pretty healthy compared to some alternatives. I know I want to support local agriculture but I must admit I find imported processed foods to be much healthier and natural then our processed foods....ever notice that?
OBTW.....the pancakes were not sour at all and the recipe has baking soda in it so maybe it does take the sour away?

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: K-Falls Farmgirl
Replied on: Feb 21 2009 6:33:35 PM
Message:

My "mother" is the original one that was started when this thread was posted and we got the MJ magazine. So it has matured..

Cheryl
Farmgirl #309


Almost daily posts at:
http://www.k-fallsfarmgirl.blogspot.com/
Come visit the barn at http://barndoorcreations.blogspot.com/

Every time I hear the dirty word 'exercise',
I wash my mouth out with chocolate.


Reply author: ddmashayekhi
Replied on: Feb 21 2009 6:55:19 PM
Message:

I made the caraway rye bread today and it came out perfect! The best rye bread I have ever eaten and amazingly it was made by me! I'm so thrilled to be able to actually make yummy bread.

Dawn in IL


Reply author: khartquilt
Replied on: Feb 21 2009 8:43:54 PM
Message:

I made my third loaf today, and again, it was a rock. It could not be eaten. Im not sure what to do. I am ready to give up. I would like one nice loaf!!!
My starter smells nice and looks real bubbly. To the two cups I removed to make my bread, I added 1/4 cup of warm water. The batter was sticky and looked like MaryJanes. It grew to twice the size. After baking for 30 minutes it was still hard as a rock. And it was more sour or tangy then before. grumble, grumble...and I just purchased a nice 2 quart pot....I think I am going to just make some with an envelope of yeast. Now I need to figure out how to use my starter with the yeast. Does any one think that will work???

Kathy H
Farmgirl Sister #81
"To the world you may be one person, but to one person you may be the world..." (anomymous)
http://khartquilt.blogspot.com


Reply author: urban farm girl
Replied on: Feb 22 2009 06:36:55 AM
Message:

Kathy.....same here..exactly the same. I actually started over with a new starter. Like you I did everything to the instructions. I did google sour dough bread and there are some links with the recipe with yeast. Any problem let me know I have printed some...but google it and see. Good luck.


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 22 2009 06:54:24 AM
Message:

Kathy here are the directions for making the farmhouse bread

"To the 2 cups you removed into your measuring “bowl,” add 3/4 t salt and 1 t honey (to sweeten the rise). Stir. Add 1 1/2 cups more white flour. Stir with a wooden spoon. It’s a good workout for your arm (the handle on the measuring “bowl” helps you get the job done), but you know you need it—you just don’t knead it, the time-consuming part that I never really came to terms with, even though I know my grandmother kneaded her bread for something like 20 minutes. My ritual takes no more than a couple of minutes."

I am not sure why you are adding a 1/4 cup of warm water. It looks like you could have the recipe wrong so hopefully this could fix the problem! Also - be sure you are using a thermometer to check the temp as you bake!


Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 22 2009 06:57:38 AM
Message:

Here is the link to the Bread directions in case anyone needs it.

http://www.maryjanesfarm.org/Recipes-Patterns-Instructions/no-knead_bread.asp

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: urban farm girl
Replied on: Feb 22 2009 07:13:55 AM
Message:

Julie....I don't add any more water...followed the directions to a T...like you said maybe the house is too cold...I don't know doesn't seem to be... but I made a new starter any way. Like one of the gals said when I'm ready to bake it I will stick in the bathroom to rise...keep the door shut nd no one can go in :)


Reply author: Suzan
Replied on: Feb 22 2009 07:20:48 AM
Message:

Kathy, Try the San Francisco "style" french bread recipe that Ronna posted on this thread, my starter is still rather young so used this and it came out great! It does use yeast with the starter also.


Reply author: khartquilt
Replied on: Feb 22 2009 10:28:22 AM
Message:

Julie,
I followed the direction to the T. (Melissa, I stole your line) I know the extra water was not in the original directions. It’s just that the dough was very dry. It was not a sticky mass as MaryJanes describes. I thought that maybe my house is just too dry.
Remember three weeks ago my first loaf was ok. Good enough with soup or just toasted with butter and honey.
Susan, Thank you. I am going to try the San francisco style.
So this morning I took the balance of my starter, 2 cups, to it added the honey and salt. I also added 1/2 of warm watered yeast. I then added the flour. About two cups.

Let me just say it has doubled nicely. I punched it down, (I know the recipe does not call for that)It is very airy and moist. I will let it grow for another hour or two.
I guess I am just not capable of making a true sour dough loaf.
I will give it one more try next week. I will start all over again.


Kathy H
Farmgirl Sister #81
"To the world you may be one person, but to one person you may be the world..." (anomymous)
http://khartquilt.blogspot.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 22 2009 10:53:49 AM
Message:

Kathy - what is the consistancy of your starter? Is it really thick or is it somewhat thin? You may need to increase the amount of water you add to your starter just a bit. I would also suggest that rather than adding extra water to your dough that you cut back on the flour. Add 1 cup of flour and begin to stir. Then add the remaining half cup of flour a tablespoon at a time until you reach the desired consistancy. Adding extra water can throw off the gluten and yeast balance.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 22 2009 10:56:26 AM
Message:

Here is a link to a cast iron bread pan for 19.99. The picture is near the top of the page. You have to scroll down to order. I know several of you were looking for one of these.

http://www.chuckwagonsupply.com/catpage7.html#cabin

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Deni
Replied on: Feb 22 2009 11:51:11 AM
Message:

It's really great to follow everyone's progress. I would say my artisan bread was a success this time. I took pics, but haven't figured out how to upload them. Do they have to be on a server?

Anyway -
My Mom is three weeks old. Week three, to my well-rested Mom I added unbleached all week, and when I went to bake I added two Tablespoons honey and only 1 cup whole wheat pastry flour. It just didn't seem to need more. After about 7 hours I finally saw some rise. When I touched lightly there was spring-back. Baked it at 8:30 pm. Breakfast proved that the crumb was good and the flavor just the right amount of sour. This week I'm going to reinforce the whole wheat for a couple of days then return to unbleached.

A house in the country is not the same as a country house. Gertrude Stein (1874 - 1946)

sunshinedreamkitchen.blogspot.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 22 2009 11:55:09 AM
Message:

Yes Deni the pics need to be on a server. I like flickr.com but many here use photobucket.com.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Farmers Daughter
Replied on: Feb 22 2009 12:07:16 PM
Message:



Kathy~ I just made my first 2 free form loves of bread today. After reading through the pages of this thread I was worried that my fist attempt would yield 2 paper weights so I followed the recipe given on page 13. It called for 1 1/2 cups of started and 1 pk of yeast. I am happy to report I have two round/oval shaped loaves cooling right now. Well one has the end cut off already, couldn't wait. After letting it rise about 1 1/2 hour then forming my breads and rising again. I am very happy with the result for my first time using my started. Since I only used 1 1/2 cups of starter then I think I should still have 1/2 cup to use on biscuit. Cause the farmhouse white bread called to take out 2 cups. Hope I got that right.
Next week I will see how my mother is doing and plan to make the bread the Mary Jane way. Just got scared cause seemed like the first time everyone was having some rising trouble.

One other thing that recipe called for a total of 5 cups of flour. I only use approx 4 when making my dough. You just have to add a little at a time to see how the dough feels. If I make it again it might need all 5 cups.

Good luck~


Reply author: Deni
Replied on: Feb 22 2009 12:11:30 PM
Message:

Thanks, Julie!

A house in the country is not the same as a country house. Gertrude Stein (1874 - 1946)

sunshinedreamkitchen.blogspot.com


Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Feb 22 2009 1:16:50 PM
Message:

Yes, thank you Julie...those pans are very reasonable! "Lizzie" is doing great....she rested comfortably yesterday and today I gave her a clean bowl, fed her and a clean damp cloth over her (purified water of course). She is already bubbling away again....I think she likes it here!

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 22 2009 4:28:57 PM
Message:

Pecan/Date Bread
2 cups starter
¾ t salt
1/3 cup molasses
¾ cup chopped dates
½ cup chopped pecans
1 cup unbleached white flour
½ cup whole wheat flour
Combine starter, salt, molasses, dates and pecans in a large mixing bowl with a handle. Use a wooden spoon to mix thoroughly. Stir in flour and mix until dough is wet and sticky. It will be like the consistency of a very moist cookie dough. Transfer to a 2 qt. cast iron saucepan or Dutch oven. Allow to rise 6 – 8 hours or overnight if you want this for breakfast. Preheat oven to 425 and cook loaf 20 minutes or until the internal temperature reaches 195 – 205 degrees. Remove loaf from pan and cool on a rack. When slightly cooled, slice and enjoy with some farm fresh butter!


I used local molasses and pecans from our own trees.








This is my dough before rising.


This is my dough after rising. It is from a different angle but hopefully you can see the difference.


I forgot to spray my dutch oven and the bottom of the middle of my loaf got stuck! BUMMER!


But it still tastes delicious!


Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: urban farm girl
Replied on: Feb 22 2009 5:17:50 PM
Message:

Those pictures are so great....you sure got it going on Julie!


Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Feb 23 2009 05:52:49 AM
Message:

You're a whiz girlfriend! Where do you get the Ozark molasses? I keep trying to buy local don't ya know! You're recipes are all so good! Thanks again for sharing them!

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: Gaelic Gardener
Replied on: Feb 23 2009 06:11:14 AM
Message:

Well, yesterday marked 2 weeks for my starter, but I'm still not getting bubbles and it's still thick and sticky.
--Kelly

“We can complain because rose bushes have thorns,
or rejoice because thorn bushes have roses.”
Abraham Lincoln


Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Feb 23 2009 07:32:07 AM
Message:

I have not had a problem getting bubbles....what kind of towel are you using over the top? I used a lightweight open weave sort of cotton dish towel. You might have trouble if you use a heavier towel over the top because the "yeasties" are in the air and have to have a way to get in there from what I understand. I know years ago when I made some it was in a mason jar with cheesecloth over the top and set outside (it was summer). You might want to try cheesecloth. I hope this helps a little. So sorry you're having trouble...I know it can be frustrating but stick with it....you will be SO glad you did when you finally get the finished product and I've only made the pancakes so far but they are the best I have ever had! Good luck and make sure you are following the directions to a "T". Hugs!

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 23 2009 08:16:47 AM
Message:

Kelley if your starter is still very thick after 2 weeks you may not be getting enough water. Try doubling the water over the next few days until you get the consistancy of about a pancake batter or a little thicker. Then see if you start getting bubbles. Are you getting any of the Hooch (liquid on top)?

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 23 2009 08:19:28 AM
Message:

Sandra I am pretty sure I bought the molasses in Mtn. View but I have seen it other places. I'll do some research and see if I can find a place near to you that carries it. They make a sorgum molasses and have honey too. The sorgum is AWESOME!!!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Feb 23 2009 09:21:06 AM
Message:

I know..I LOVE sorghum better than honey on my biscuits now! I do get to Mountain View once in awhile...and I like to buy local honey if I can but the closest I've gotten is Little Rock and who knows where the honey came from...it was just bottled in Little Rock not necessarily honey collected from that area. I like honey in my tea. Thanks Julie and thanks for your book list too! I always look forward to that on your blog!

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: Gaelic Gardener
Replied on: Feb 23 2009 09:22:11 AM
Message:

I'm using a thin (almost like linen) cotton dishcloth. The first week with just the dry towel I got a pretty thick crust each day, but it would disolve back into the starter. The second week with the wet towel I'm not getting any crust. I'm not getting any hooch, but it does have a tangy, if not sour smell. I'll keep on keeping on, and thanks Julie, I'll try adding more water this week and we'll see what happens.
--Kelly

“We can complain because rose bushes have thorns,
or rejoice because thorn bushes have roses.”
Abraham Lincoln


Reply author: urban farm girl
Replied on: Feb 23 2009 11:21:39 AM
Message:

I made a brand new starter over the weekend and this one is looking REAL good, very bubbly and I wrapped another towel around the bowl to keep her warm... so far so good. I'm keeping my fingers crossed. I'm anxious to try the pancakes and cakes but I just would like one loaf of bread. So...we'll see.


Reply author: sunflowercritters
Replied on: Feb 23 2009 11:30:41 AM
Message:

Hi I'm back I'm so....excited I finally made the sourdough bread. It looks so.. good. My husband is so happy it worked for me this time. I think this was my third time trying again. I did use different flour and I quess that was the problem for me.
Cann't wait to make more soon. Yummy!!! thanks again for All your help and encouragement.
farmgirl sister #462

Worry ends Where Faith in God begins.


Reply author: nin1952
Replied on: Feb 23 2009 12:00:16 PM
Message:


HI ALL I am into my fourth week with Sallie Mae (my Mom's name). I made my bread Saturday. Well, I used my 2 cups of starter, 3/4 tsp salt, 1 tsp honey and 1 1/2 cups of flour. I anxiously waited and waited and waited 8 full hours. I had it sitting pretty close to my woodheater (I don't have a good warm place but there) and it rose about 1 1/2 inches. AHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!! OK I baked it anyway and it turned out with a very hard crust and a fairly good inside. What else can I do. I keep it close to my woodheater with a towel wrapped around it all week. I feed it everyday with 2/3 cups flour (KA Unbleached Organic AP Flour) and 1/2 cup purified water. It is thinner than a pancake batter, still has the hooch on top and has a few bubbles. What is wrong? Do I just need to keep it going or do I need to start over? Also I just love all of the recipes. I hope to try them one day.

Donna


Reply author: jenybea
Replied on: Feb 23 2009 3:39:03 PM
Message:

So that I do not have to read a million and five posts....
Can you use organic whole wheat flour for the starter rather than plain organic flour?

THANK YOU !
Jenny


Reply author: Leezard
Replied on: Feb 23 2009 3:55:47 PM
Message:

Any chance we could start a thread of just recipes that you ladies have posted? It's hard to go through all the pages looking for them :)

Jenny, I believe that it's best to start with white flour and then when you bake the bread some have used whole wheat and had good luck with it. Maybe once you get your starter going you could skip baking one week, take out the two cups and start a seperate starter trying to add whole wheat for part or all of the daily stir in...I say skip baking so if the whole wheat in the starter doesn't work you don't have to start all over again.

Donna, when I was getting the hooch for a couple of days I started adding in a tablespoon or so extra flour a day until the hooch didn't come up anymore. Good luck!

http://ruby--slippers.blogspot.com/
www.leezard.etsy.com


Reply author: Deni
Replied on: Feb 23 2009 4:30:54 PM
Message:

Jenybea -- I jumped right in with whole wheat - organic of course. I've made bread three times. The first week I started with 2 cups ww pastry, then added 1/3 c ww bread flour each day with the purified h2o. That week the bread did NOT rise.

Week two of the starter I put in nothing but ww pastry flour. Some rise - but remember that starter gets better as it matures.

Week three I used unbleached organic flour every day, then baked bread using 1 cup ww pastry flour. I only needed a cup. Pretty dry in my house right now. I also bumped the honey from 1 t to 2 tablespoon. That was before I knew about "sweetening" with baking soda.

After letting Mom sit on Saturday, I decided to add a couple of days worth of ww pastry to keep the ww factor strong. This morning - day two of adding 1/3 cup, she was bubbling like crazy and very happy.

I think my mother is successful because the organic flour I started with is pretty good stuff. The health food store where I buy it repackages or sells it in bulk and they turn it over pretty fast. It doesn't sit forever in paper packages on store shelves. I have not yet purchased the King Arthur flour - though I plan to do that sometime soon. The pastry flour is labeled "locally grown". That means the owners are buying it from a local farmer. Probably extra fresh!

This is just my personal experience. I followed the directions carefully - except I forgot and used tap water on my towel the first week because I wasn't paying good attention.

Hope this helps you decide.



sunshinedreamkitchen.blogspot.com


Reply author: kristin sherrill
Replied on: Feb 23 2009 4:33:33 PM
Message:

I know it's in here somewhere, but can't find the answer. I have been using KA organic and today I found Bob's Red Mill organic for SOOO much cheaper. So can I add this new flour to the original starter or should I just start a new one?

Kris

Turn your face to the sun and the shadows fall behind you. Maori proverb


Reply author: khartquilt
Replied on: Feb 23 2009 4:35:44 PM
Message:

Not to be a poor sport but...I baked my last rock. I am going to give it up for a while and try again when it gets a little warmer.
I will keep my eye on this thread. Steal a few recipes to try later.

Back to the sewing room for me. The kitchen is just not my cup of tea.

Kathy H
Farmgirl Sister #81
"To the world you may be one person, but to one person you may be the world..." (anomymous)
http://khartquilt.blogspot.com


Reply author: MaryJane
Replied on: Feb 23 2009 5:06:19 PM
Message:

Here’s a recipe for two scrumptious baguettes using my Farmhouse White recipe. I purchased a really cool baguette loaf pan here locally for $13 and used it to make two PERFECT loaves that tasted divine!

Using my Farmhouse White recipe to the T, as soon as the dough was pulling away from the sides of my bowl, I plopped in onto my table covered in flour and divided it into two equal halves. Then I spread them out with my hands into two rectangles 7 x 13 inches. (You can use a rolling pin if you want—each half of dough weighed just a tad shy of 3/4 pound each—the total ball of dough weighing 1.43# to be exact.)





Next, I dusted any loose flour off them. Using a pastry brush, I painted them with a light coat of warmish water. Starting on the long edges, I rolled them up to form two long baguettes. I tucked the short ends under and placed them seam sides down into the pan.





I used my pastry brush again to wet the tops with warm water and set them to rise with a wet towel over them. I put canning jars around them so the towel wasn’t lying right on top of the rising loaves. I checked the temperature where I set them to rise and it was 80 degrees so I knew they’d rise fairly quickly.



They were ready for the oven in four hours. I kept the towel moistened by spritzing it. If the temp had been 65-70 degrees, they would have needed 6-8 hours.

I put a muffin tin on the bottom shelf of my oven with ½ inch water in each depression. Then, I turned the oven on to 425 degrees.

While it was preheating, I mixed together 1 T warm water and 1 egg white and painted that onto the tops of each loaf after I used a razor to slice four slits on the tops of each loaf.

After they were in the oven for 10 minutes, I painted them one more time with the egg white wash. After ten more minutes (20 minutes total), my instant read thermometer said they were done (200 degrees internally) but I wanted them a tad more golden. I watched them closely and left them in 5 more minutes. I let them cool in the pans.




MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~


Reply author: acairnsmom
Replied on: Feb 23 2009 5:56:03 PM
Message:

Oh MJ, those look so yummy! I love baguettes! Tomorrow's my first day baking with my mother, Ruby, I think she'll only be up for pancakes tomorrow and we'll wait and try bread next week. Hopefully, she'll be able to make some bread as good looking as those baguettes. Thanks for the tutorial! I find the all the pictures on here very helpful.

Audrey

Toto, we're not in Kansas any more!


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 23 2009 6:37:42 PM
Message:

Okay lets see if I can respond without missing anybody!

Melissa - It sounds like your new starter is of to a good start!

Debra - Glad you had some success! Keep it up!

Donna - the hooch isn't "bad" but you can minimize it by doing double feedings. Either feed twice a day or twice as much once a day.
If your bread is good on the inside but too hard on the top try brushing the top with butter right after you take it out of the oven. This will give you a softer crust.

Jenny - as some others mentioned it is best to use the white flour in the starter and save the wheat for when you mix up your dough recipes. It has something to do with the glutens in the flour.

Elizabeth - I am working on organizing all the recipes that have been posted in a more user friendly manner. Check back and I'll try to keep you posted.

Kristin - as long as your starter is healthy you can probably substitute the new flour right in.

Kathy - sorry it didn't work out for you! I wish I could come up there and help you work it out! MAybe when the weather gets warmer!

MaryJane - those loaves look fabulous!!! Where did you order that baguette pan? I have to have one!!!

Audry - Good luck tomorrow!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Suzan
Replied on: Feb 23 2009 6:55:15 PM
Message:

Julie, Thanks for all your assistance and hard work here!


Reply author: mimilou
Replied on: Feb 24 2009 03:17:16 AM
Message:


My mother is now 2 weeks old. I have followed the directions to a T. Using Arrowhead Mills organic unbleached (that's all I could find), distilled water, ceramic bowl, wooden spoon, etc. I feed my mother in the a.m. and keep her on my stove. I now give her a stir when I come home from work - she gets all bubbly and that makes me happy!
The first week I followed the suggestions and made the pancakes - they were wonderful, the batter got bubbly and...success. Second week, I readied my 2 qt. Lodge dutch oven, prepared the recipe for the basic white - again followed the directions to a T. Plopped the dough in the dutch oven and put it in my microwave above my range - I had the lights on underneath which created heat inside the microwave - it was the perfect place. The dough rose perfectly - I actually baked it after approx. 5 hours of letting it rise. Used the instant read thermometer at about 15 minutes - as the top was getting brown - but NO, it wasn't done, so I waited another 5-10 minutes - and BINGO - 190 degrees. Pulled it out and it was PERFECT! I could not butter the pieces fast enough - everyone was gobbling it up.
Needless to say - it was a proud moment!!
One small issue I had the first week was the skin that formed - most days i just pulled it off, rather than stir it in. Our house is dry so I make sure that per the directions, I wet my towel (every a.m.) when I feed my mother.
This week I hope to make the date/nut bread.
I've been copying all the recipes as they come along and have them in a folder.
This makes a great little loaf of bread. Enjoy.


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 24 2009 04:37:19 AM
Message:

Mary Lou I am so glad you had such sucess!!!! If your starter continues to get a skin you may try wetting your towel in the evening as well! Great job!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: olive610
Replied on: Feb 24 2009 06:32:59 AM
Message:

Kathy, I am with you. I don't mean to be a poor sport either but my bread this week was awful. This was week 3 and I had a very flat very sour loaf. It was awful.

It was very discouraging having to feed mother every day and lovingly caring for her. Then she turned around and did that to me. Week 2 I had a beautiful loaf but this one was inedible. Mother got dumped down the kitchen disposal. Maybe I will try again when it gets warmer.

Right now I have my old faithful Herman starter in the fridge.



"Life is a great big canvas, and you should throw all the paint on it you can." Danny Kaye


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 24 2009 07:27:58 AM
Message:

Mary-Alice I am sorry that you had a dissapointing experience. If you try it again I wish you much success.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: campchic
Replied on: Feb 24 2009 1:03:22 PM
Message:

I didn't get to baking my bread this last weekend. So I'm still just adding the flour & water like the instructions say to. Is this a bad idea? I know I'll be baking quite a bit this weekend. So I just figured I'd have enough for extra loaves.

Erin

P.S. Can you make dog biscuits using your "mother"?

Farmgirl #190
www.concrete-and-grace.blogspot.com


Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Feb 24 2009 1:55:41 PM
Message:

Mary Jane....LOVE the baguettes! Where did you get the double pan for them? $13.00...that sounds pretty reasonable! Were they new? Your "mother" must be a Doozie! Those were pretty flat when you rolled them out and boy did they ever turn out nice. I'm stuffing my face with peanut butter cookies becuase I don't have any bread YET to eat! But, this last week it was Julie's pancakes and this week will be Ronna's SF French bread and next week Mary Jane's Farmhouse bread! I am working "Lizzie" up to it....I don't want to rush her! I talk to her and feed her and encourage her with little "pep" talks so hopefully that will help! I honor all living things and she is living and bubbling away!
Keep your fingers crossed! How old is your starter by the way? Years and years? I wonder how old the oldest starter is and if some are still around (descendants of course) from the "old days"...as in My youth as my children like to tell me. I'd be curious to know that one!
Thanks so much for you and Julie's advice, pictures, recipes and cheer leading!

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: FarmGirl~K
Replied on: Feb 24 2009 10:32:06 PM
Message:

Well I came home today to big disappointment. Week 2 of feeding my mother. Had fuzzy mold growing on the side of the bowl. It wasn't touching the starter, but I didnt want to chance it so I am throwing it away again.

Only thing I did different this week was moisten the towel & put on a plate propped open a bit per the instructions in the mag. I always scrape down the sides, everything comes off but a bit that is like glue. But that pretty much has been dry. I haven't had a problem w/a crust forming on top, do I have to wet the towel & put on a plate? Just wondering if it was too moist w/the wet towel.

I was so looking forward to making bread this week too!

"I have an irrepressible desire to live till I can be assured that the world is a little better for my having lived in it."
– Abraham Lincoln


Reply author: Deni
Replied on: Feb 25 2009 07:17:26 AM
Message:

Well, Kelly - I may be sorry, but I found that same fuzzy grey stuff on the side of my bowl a couple of days ago. I carefully wiped it off with a damp paper towel and transferred (with a spoon - so I didn't run Mother through the moldy spots) into a clean bowl. She seems fine. The moldy bowl was my original. It had gotten to the point where there were places that wouldn't scrape down. I think MJ recommends changing bowls every month or so, anyway.

I figure what doesn't kill you makes you stronger. We'll see. My point is, I don't think you did anything wrong (or if you did, I did too!;) It's the nature of the beastie to grow yeastie. Don't feel bad --

Your fellow mold grower, Deni



sunshinedreamkitchen.blogspot.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 25 2009 07:20:05 AM
Message:

Erin - I did the same with one of my starters and didn't have a problem. I think you should be good! I will work on a Dog Biscuit recipe!

Kelly - It will depend on the humidity in your house. If you have a lot of moisture you probably wouldn't need to constantly wet the towel. I have't had any mold growing on mine and I believe mine are going on 6 weeks old. I change my bowl every 2 weeks.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Feb 25 2009 07:46:30 AM
Message:

Oh...dog biscuits!!! GREAT!!! I was just going to start making my own anyway. It never dawned on me to use the starter for that! I have made my own before but usually just for special occassions but I don't like the dyes and recalls on animal food of any kind so whatever I can do to feed "purely"! Thanks, Julie!

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 25 2009 08:13:48 AM
Message:

Okay I took a dog biscuit recipe I've made before and adapted it a little.

I HAVE NOT TESTED THIS VERSION OF THE RECIPE YET! But since you all were interested I though I would post it anyway. I will test it this weekend and post some pictures. If YOU try it, let me know what you think.


Sourdough Dog Treats

1 Cup Starter
1/2 C. Pureed Pumpkin (Or 2 smalls jars of any babyfood)
2 eggs
1/4 C. Peanut Butter
1/4 tsp. Garlic Powder
2 Tbs. Bacon Drippings (Or 1 beef bullion cube disolved in 2 Tbs. of water)
1 Cup Oats (Quick or oldfashioned)
2 1/2 C. Whole Wheat Flour

Note: This will be a fairly dry dough! I would suggest adding the last half cup of flour about a Tbs. at a time until you get a workable consistancy.

Combine all ingredients in a large mixing bowl with a handle. Stir until well mixed. You may need to mix by hand at the end to get it all combined.

Roll out dough and use a cookie cutter to cut out desired shapes. You can also just cut log or nugget shapes suitable to your dogs size if you prefer.

Place onto a cookie sheet and bake at 325 for 20 minutes. Flip the biscuits over and bake an additional 20 minutes. Turn off the heat to the oven leaving the biscuits inside until the oven has cooled completely.

The biscuits are now ready to serve to your doggie. Let the rest airdry until hard and crisp before storing in an airtight container. If allowed to dry completely the biscuits COULD last about a month or so.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: FarmGirl~K
Replied on: Feb 25 2009 09:08:03 AM
Message:

Well I'm so glad I havent thrown it away yet. I fell asleep early last night before messing with it. I will transfer it to another bowl & see how it goes. I just wanted to make sure no mold got into the mother. If you both did that & all seems fine I should be too right! I also won't be adding the wet towel back on unless I see it start to dry out. Thanks girls again for your help!

"I have an irrepressible desire to live till I can be assured that the world is a little better for my having lived in it."
– Abraham Lincoln


Reply author: acairnsmom
Replied on: Feb 25 2009 11:14:40 AM
Message:

Yippee! My first baking day was an overall success! DH is back working in "Alee country" so I'm a party of one right now and didn't feel like fixing that many pancakes. I halved the recipe and with the other half I made a wee loaf of the Farmhouse White. It didn't raise a whole lot but enough that it was recognizable as bread. I halved the recipe for the bread but still didn't add all the extra flour. "Ruby" was pretty stiff to begin with so felt I'd be safe not putting it all in (didn't want the bricks like some have reported). I was very pleased with the results.

The pancakes were also very yummy! I'm tickled pink that everything came out so well. I believe I'll be slowly doubling "Ruby" so I can make some of the other delicious recipes you all have posted.

Audrey

Toto, we're not in Kansas any more!


Reply author: Calicogirl
Replied on: Feb 25 2009 12:58:06 PM
Message:

I made my starter Sunday! I am excited, it smells really nice. The only thing is it is pretty dry here with a wood stove so I switched to the wet cloth earlier so the starter doesn't get a thick skin.

~Sharon

By His Grace, For His Glory


Reply author: Quintessential Kate
Replied on: Feb 25 2009 1:29:03 PM
Message:

Julie,
Thanks for the Doggie Treat recipe. My schnauzer girls love C-O-O-K-I-E-S!!!! They both get one treat every evening.......and I think they're going to love these.
Thanks again,
Kate

Heart of Texas
Chapter
AKA: Hot Farmgirl #234
http://quintessentialkate.blogspot.com

Today is my best day!


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 25 2009 3:11:12 PM
Message:

Kate I am defrosting some of the pumpkin I put up this fall so I can make these later tonight! I'll take some pictures to post later.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: kristin sherrill
Replied on: Feb 25 2009 7:33:42 PM
Message:

The pecan date bread is GOOD!

Kris

Turn your face to the sun and the shadows fall behind you. Maori proverb


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 25 2009 8:07:25 PM
Message:

Kristin I had some leftover cream cheese frosting from my carrot cake and spread that on a slice and it was SO good.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Sewsmartie
Replied on: Feb 25 2009 8:20:01 PM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by willowtreecreek

Mary-Alice I am sorry that you had a dissapointing experience. If you try it again I wish you much success.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com




Sewsmartie


Reply author: Sewsmartie
Replied on: Feb 25 2009 8:23:54 PM
Message:

I, too, followed the instructions to a T. I made the 2 grapefruit-sized "water balls" and scored the top. Allowed them to rise almost 8 hours. However, they spread, but were only 1-1/2" high. What is the problem?

I will try again this week, but may just need to go back to the packaged yeast. What a disappointment!

Martie

Sewsmartie


Reply author: prariehawk
Replied on: Feb 25 2009 9:11:18 PM
Message:

Oops--I made bread tonight and forgot to add honey or salt--but it turned out great anyway! Just perfect for slathering on the butter! I'm going to start over again with my mother cause I also found some mold growing on the side of the bowl--so I carefully transferred it to another bowl and used it all up. I think there was too much moisture with it being covered with a damp towel--had better success with a dry towel. Then again, I've been using tap water to moisten the towel--maybe I should switch to purified water for the towel--I use purified water for the mother--has anyone else who's been having problems with mold been using plain tap water for the towel? Could it really make that big a difference? Maybe I should invest in faucet-mounted purifier--they're a little pricey, but if it makes that big a difference...


Reply author: gardenmaam
Replied on: Feb 25 2009 10:10:26 PM
Message:

Prariehawk~
I've been watching my Mother to see if she is going to get mold or not. I was using purified water diligently since I started this a month ago. Last week I used tap water for a couple of days on the towell only, and then I noticed days later that the top looks a little puffy and had a stronger smell other than yeast. Pulled that top off.
So...am watching it to see what happens. But definately switched to ONLY purified water for me. Also, I ran out of King Arthur flour at about that time and started using Gold Medal till I could find more KA flour.
Maybe the combo of those two things started a potential problem?? Will see what happens.


Reply author: Jennie From Maine
Replied on: Feb 26 2009 05:39:20 AM
Message:

That's awesome, I can't wait to try making some. Those rustic loaves looked amazing!


Reply author: Gaelic Gardener
Replied on: Feb 26 2009 10:11:59 AM
Message:

HOUSTON WE HAVE BUBBLES!!!!

Thanks Julie, the double water trick seems to have worked! I'll let you know what happens Saturday when I make my first attempt at bread. Keep your fingers crossed!
--Kelly

“We can complain because rose bushes have thorns,
or rejoice because thorn bushes have roses.”
Abraham Lincoln


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 26 2009 10:22:47 AM
Message:

Martie - how old is your starter? It sounds like thenatural yeasts haven't developed yet.

Kelly- so glad to hear it!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: GailMN
Replied on: Feb 26 2009 1:45:57 PM
Message:

My Mother is on day 5, 2 more days and I make bread! Woo Hoo! The article indicated the choice of flour was key, I was unable to locate King Arthur in my area, but am using Hodgson Mill unbleached organic white flour with success. The starter (mother) is beginning to have a slightly sour smell and is a beautiful creamy color. Can't wait to make bread. My membership to this site was activated today, and I "applied" for Farmgirl Sister, so will join your ranks soon. I love what I have seen so far.

GailMN

A Smile a Day . . .


Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Feb 26 2009 2:40:21 PM
Message:

Welcome Gail! I'm a week ahead of you with my "Lizzie" and made the pancakes last week...YUMMO! I moved here from Iowa so we used to be neighbors sort of....I used to go to Canada and loved driving through your beautiful state. I also used the Hodgson Mills organic flour and "so far so good"! I wish you the best on your Mother too. Keep in touch!

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: amberjsquirrel
Replied on: Feb 27 2009 10:37:22 AM
Message:

Hello! I just joined yesterday and discovered MaryJanesFarm two weeks ago, started a mother and she died of mold and started a new one a week ago using all the tips I gleaned from reading all 54 pages in a week. Whew! I feel like I crossed a finish line with my arms waving wooden spoons in the air!

I have two questions: I accidently fed my mother a cup of water instead of 1/4 cup, so I quadrupled the flour feeding that day to keep the same ratio. Does this mean I had better remove more on baking day? Is there a minimum and maximum amount to leave in the bowl? I will probably want to start baking more than once a week once I actually get something in my mouth (judging by the beautiful pictures y'all have posted.) I know it has been said that it is simple math, but simple math is hard for the sleep-deprived mother of a toddler. :) Can I leave the extra in the bowl until I am ready to bake more or should I remove it and leave the amount I would have if I had not accidently put in a whole cup?

Second question: Has anyone played around with beer yeast in breadmaking? My husband is a home-brewer and he now has mixed flour and water and taken some yeast out of a huge white bucket that smells funky and is making his own "starter" or bowl of bubbling yeasty flour, if not exactly a starter. It's nice our interests have converged. Yeast has brought us closer--LOL.

Nice to be here and thanks for everyone's help, pictures and good humor!

And hello to "boone" (sorry I don't remember your real name). I grew up in Mt. Vernon, OH, so I am happy to see someone from my old farmgirlland.


Reply author: ParisKnight
Replied on: Feb 28 2009 11:23:21 AM
Message:

Hi All,

I'm new to the forum. I came across MaryJane's magazine a few weeks back here in Boston, MA. I immediately bought it (and subscribed) and that weekend started up a mother. Last week I baked my first loaf - the basic sourdough - and it turned out great. Today I thought I would be a little more adventurous so Julie's pecan date bread is rising right now. Hopefully, I will have luck because it sounds delicious! I'll let you know how it turns out.

Looking forward to being part of the MaryJane family!


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Feb 28 2009 11:50:54 AM
Message:

Welcome to the forum, Kathy! It sounds like your starter is doing very well!

I neglected my starter for two weeks!! I then fed her and made bread. Our house was very cold so I let it rise overnight and baked it yesterday! It turned out really great! It's sourness was very developed which is not my personal taste preference. However Doug really liked it and we have already gone through a loaf and a quarter!

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: pearlgirl
Replied on: Feb 28 2009 1:07:03 PM
Message:

I had brown bananas, excess sourdough starter, and needed a dessert for tomorrow for a friend who is allergic to milk; so I combined a few recipes and this is what I came up with:


Sourdough Banana Cake

1 c. sugar
1 1/3 c. flour
1 1/4 t. baking powder
1 1/4 t. baking soda
1 t. salt
3 eggs
1 1/4 c. mashed bananas (3-4 bananas)
1 c. mother
1 t. vanilla
2/3 c. chopped walnuts (opt)
2/3 c. chocolate chips (opt)
Chocolate or Vanilla Frosting (opt)

Preheat oven to 350 F. Grease and flour two 9" round cake pans or a 13"X9" pan.

Stir together in small bowl sugar, flour, b. powder, b. soda, and salt. In large mixing bowl combine eggs, bananas, mother and vanilla. Stir in dry mixture. Beat with electric mixer on high for 3 minutes. Stir in nuts and chips. Pour into pan(s) and bake for 35-40 minutes for round cake pans or 45-50 minutes for 13"X9" or until toothpick when inserted in center comes out clean. Let cool and frost with chocolate or vanilla frosting.



Favour is deceitful, and beauty is vain: but a woman that feareth the LORD, she shall be praised. Give her of the fruit of her hands; and let her own works praise her in the gates.
Pro 31:30,31

http://pearlsgleanings.blogspot.com/
http://www.pearlgirl901.etsy.com/


Reply author: Deni
Replied on: Feb 28 2009 1:15:12 PM
Message:

Welcome to the new members! I was one of you just a few weeks ago. I've looked forward to bread-baking day and delighted in taking care of Mom every day. I've been semi-successful - a little more rise in my bread each week. This week Mom was looking and smelling better than ever. There was no hooch - very little crusting over - and maximum bubbling every day when I fed her. So I'm in the middle of my next experiment - adding more ingredients to the Farm House White (Wheat) recipe and treating it more like yeast bread.

Here's what I did: To one cup milk I added 4 T butter and 2 T honey. I melted that together in the microwave. The butter wasn't quite liquid so I poured off the milk and reheated the butter. That all went into a big ceramic mixing bowl with a teaspoon of salt, and was allowed to cool (an old habit from making yeast bread - LOL). To that I added 2 cups of Mom and stirred until mixed with a wooden spoon. Then, one cup at a time I added whole wheat pastry flour (unsifted), unbleached flour, and one cup whole wheat pastry flour - in that order. The dough was pulling off the sides of the bowl at this point. I poured 1/3 cup ww pastry flour on my butcher block, poured the dough onto it, and spread another 1/3 cup flour on top. I incorporated the flour, kneading sort of, adding more flour to keep it from sticking to my hands and the board until I incorporated a total of 1 and 1/3 cups. At this point the dough was not sticky anymore and I could just knead it - which I did for another couple of minutes. I placed it in a buttered bowl, turned it once, covered it with a dry towel and left it on top of the stove with the range light on over it for 2 and 1/2 hours. I didn't punch it down as I would have with a yeast dough - just divided it, reshaped it and put it into two loaf pans coated with butter and cornmeal. I made a long cut down the center. At last look, 30 minutes later, it was already starting to rise a little. I put it into the oven with the light on and a dry towel covering this time. Needless to say, I'm very excited - so much that I didn't wait for the results before sharing with you. Will let you know how this works.

Are y'all getting snow? We were supposed to get a bunch, but it is missing us here in Central MO.



sunshinedreamkitchen.blogspot.com


Reply author: jpbluesky
Replied on: Feb 28 2009 4:34:28 PM
Message:

Well, I have a road ahead of me to get where you all are. The second week yielded another tasty yet doughy and no-rise loaf. It did not rise at all hardly. Maybe the mother will be better if I try some of your recipes, but just baking it as bread....no luck yet.

And your photos look so yummy! I know this can work! And my mother looks perfect.....????

Farmgirl Sister # 31

www.blueskyjeannie.blogspot.com

Psalm 51: 10-13


Reply author: campchic
Replied on: Feb 28 2009 5:14:23 PM
Message:

Julie-What do you think about a thread with just sourdough recipes using our starters? There are so many amazing recipes in this thread!

Erin


Farmgirl #190
www.concrete-and-grace.blogspot.com


Reply author: K-Falls Farmgirl
Replied on: Feb 28 2009 5:21:22 PM
Message:

Shirley, My sourdough bread dough that is MJ recipe does not raise much.. I made 1 1/2 recipe and put it ina 2 qt pan. I think the older the starter the higher it raises, at least mine did.. I posted a picture on another thread.. Across the fence. of todays bread. Don't give up

Cheryl
Farmgirl #309


Almost daily posts at:
http://www.k-fallsfarmgirl.blogspot.com/
Come visit the barn at http://barndoorcreations.blogspot.com/

Every time I hear the dirty word 'exercise',
I wash my mouth out with chocolate.


Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Feb 28 2009 5:24:53 PM
Message:

WE got some this afternoon and just heard we're supposed to get more tonight....I'm lovin' it! What a great day to make bread and this is LOTS nicer than that ice storm! I made the San FRancisco sourdough recipe from Ronna and BOY did it RISE!!! I got inot trouble with that one...I think my "Lizzie" could have done it all by herself! I made a few mistakes but it turned out and tasted yummy! I'll have pics tomorrow but I'm just too tired tonight.

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: antoinette
Replied on: Feb 28 2009 7:03:51 PM
Message:

Wow!! Three hours later and I have read through all the posts on bread making. Julie thanks for all the info and if I need and help may I contact you? My starter is three weeks old now and the first two loaves of bread were okay. I plan on trying the other recipes though, that is the reason I went through all the posts because I knew someone had posted recipes, I have the pages written down so I won't have to go back through so if anyone needs to know what page give me a holler I think I can help. Antoinette


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 28 2009 7:08:40 PM
Message:

Amber - the added flour and water will yield you more starter but wont cause any problems. You can use the extra in a recipe (It should make about a cup or so extra) or you can leave it in or you can toss it. It is up to you but it wont hurt anything!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Feb 28 2009 7:12:24 PM
Message:

Erin I will check with MaryJane on starting a seperate recipe thread. The only problem with that is people will tend to start posting in response to recipes and asking questions there and I know the goal is to keep it all in one thread. I am indexing the recipes and should have that posted tomorrow.

Toni - you are welcome to email me but don't be afraid to post questions here that way EVERYONE can benefit from the responses! Glad you are joining us.

Also a special welcome to all the new girls who have posted today!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: GailMN
Replied on: Mar 01 2009 04:55:22 AM
Message:

Please forgive me if this question has already been asked, I don't have time to read through 55 pages. Yesterday I removed two cups of the starter for my bread. After a day of rest for Mother, I will feed today (Sunday). I am so pleased with my first loaf of sourdough - I will post more about that later. I would like to increase the amount of my starter. So, if I follow the plan, today I would add 1/3 cup flour and 1/4 cup water - my question is, can I double those amounts to increase the amount of starter, or do I have to start another batch, or just not use next week? My starter is doing so well, I don't want to risk ruining it - appreciate any and all help.

Thanks,
Gail


A Smile a Day . . .


Reply author: southerncrossgirl
Replied on: Mar 01 2009 06:19:22 AM
Message:

Hey, when you gals get "Mother" perfected. Please let us know how you did it.
Deni, I live in NC, and they are calling for a Big Snowfall tonight. WHERE IS SPRING!!!

BE HAPPY!!!


Reply author: Deni
Replied on: Mar 01 2009 08:25:54 AM
Message:

Good Sunday, Farm Girls! I'm sitting with my first cup of coffee munching down on fresh bread. It turned out great. I had plans last night so cut the rise a little short, but the crumb is excellent and flavor great. Super Toast! So, if you have the time, adding milk and butter, and working in more dough, and dare I say it, kneading, worked well for my month old Mom.

Gail, I've had enough of winter, too. But it really is only March 1. We're due for a warm-up mid week. I remember winters lasting all the way through March when I was a kid. BTW - I love North Carolina. I would probably move there if I could.

My experience with adding to Mom -- I just did the usual for a couple of days after her rest, then added twice a day - morning and evening - to give her a chance to keep up. That worked fine.

Happy Sunday to all!



sunshinedreamkitchen.blogspot.com


Reply author: ruralfarmgirl
Replied on: Mar 01 2009 08:55:46 AM
Message:

Deni~
GREAT job. Isnt it awesome to have fresh, yummy bread for breakfast :).....

Rene~Prosser Farmgirl #185
http://farmchicksfarm.blogspot.com/http://renenaturallyspeaking.blogspot.com/



Circumstances made us FRIENDS; MaryJane's has made us SISTERS :)


Reply author: GailMN
Replied on: Mar 01 2009 09:05:17 AM
Message:

I baked my first loaf of Sourdough bread today. I exceeded my expectations. My husband said it was VERY GOOD. Saturday, I mixed the dough and put in a removable crock liner from my smaller slow cooker (I didn't want to spend the money on a cast iron saucepan). This was at 4 p.m., I thought I would be able to bake between 10 and 12 p.m. When I checked at midnight, it had risen very little, so I was a little disappointed and decided to let it rise until morning - I checked at 5 a.m. and it had doubled in size - hooray! I baked it until the desired internal temp - took about 40 minutes and ended up with a beautiful loaf of bread. I haven't figured out how to add pics to this message, when I do I will post.

Gail




A Smile a Day . . .


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 01 2009 09:26:13 AM
Message:

Gail- it will be FINE to double the amount of flour and water. You can do it all at once or in two feeding as someone else mentioned. I'm glad your first loaf turned out so well!

Girls - I have been working on a croissant recipe this week. I need to tweak a few things and retest the recipe but will share it with you in the next day or two. I will also post pics of the dog treats.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: GailMN
Replied on: Mar 01 2009 09:45:00 AM
Message:

Julie - can you tell me the secret to posting pics, I've seen it done in this forum and I thought I saw using Photobucket referenced, but I was not successful in getting my pic posted. I've uploaded the photo to Photobucket, but an stuck there.

Thanks,
Gail


A Smile a Day . . .


Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Mar 01 2009 10:39:17 AM
Message:

Gail.....look in the forum technical at the very bottom of the list of forums and there is one in there that has the instructs for using Photo Bucket. Also, thanks for the email...I'll get back to you later today!

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: ParisKnight
Replied on: Mar 01 2009 11:03:21 AM
Message:

Baked Julie's pecan date bread yesterday. I use a 2qt calphalon pot to bake in. For my first loaf last week I used parchment paper to line the pot and it fell right out but the paper kind of stuck to the bread. So I tried it without the parchment yesterday but I didn't use any kind of spray or butter on the pot and it was a bit of a chore getting the loaf out. Was not a thing of beauty but tasted great!

Next week I will grease the pot one way or another and see what that does. I have to try a free form loaf as well.


Reply author: FarmGirl~K
Replied on: Mar 01 2009 11:44:00 AM
Message:

I didnt have so much luck with mine yesterday. Got all the stuff out to make the farmhouse bread & pulled the towel off of my bowl. Had a thin crust which I knew was ok, but on that crust was mold. Very fast growning since I had just added flour & water the evening before. I am going to try one more time. I think if I can't get it going this time. I will wait awhile before trying again. I just hate wasting all that flour. Congrats to all you girls that are having success with yours. I'm hoping 3rd times a charm.

"I have an irrepressible desire to live till I can be assured that the world is a little better for my having lived in it."
– Abraham Lincoln


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 01 2009 11:48:26 AM
Message:

Kathy - unless you have professional parchment with silicon release in it you will want to spray it first with oil or pam.

If you want to post pcs you can use the little insert imagebutton when you edit your post. You will need to paste the URL of the photo between the brackets. To get the URL right click on your picture in photo ucket or whatever server you use and selectproperties. This will bring up a new box. Higlight the http and copy it. Paste this between the sets of coded brackets.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: GailMN
Replied on: Mar 01 2009 12:07:38 PM
Message:

I posted a little earlier today, very excited about my first loaf of sourdough bread. I tried to post a picture, but was unable to until I was pointed in the direction of the info to post using Photobucket, thank you Sandra. Here is my "masterpiece" sitting on the slow cooker liner crock that I baked it in. I'm increasing my starter, so next week more bread and pancakes. This stuff is awesome.



Gail

Farmgirl Sister #506
A Smile a Day . . .


Reply author: Sewsmartie
Replied on: Mar 01 2009 12:23:44 PM
Message:

[quote][i I made the San FRancisco sourdough recipe from Ronna and BOY did it RISE!!! I got inot trouble with that one...I think my "Lizzie" could have done it all by herself! I made a few mistakes but it turned out and tasted yummy!

Where is Ronna's recipe. I am going to try again today and am just hoping it works this time.

Sewsmartie


Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Mar 01 2009 1:27:39 PM
Message:

That was me....my starter is called "Lizzie" in honor of my Mother. I would HIGHLY recommend using 2 cookie sheets since I used 1 big one and they raised into each other...but they ended up fine they were just Siamese twins when I got done.
Ronna's San Francisco Sour Dough recipe is here in the post somewhere.....oh....I think it is on page 13 here in this post. Good Luck! Plus I did not use all 5 cups of flour and I should have....the dough would have held its shape better. But you could use a loaf pan or something to ensure its shape. I'm just a beginner so what do I know!
DO NOT do what I did later which was to freeze the second loaf with a vacuum sealer....I did not hit the "moist" button and it REALLY shrunk it! Not sure it will come back when it is defrosted....it looks like the pancakes now! LOL!

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Mar 01 2009 1:28:54 PM
Message:

Gail!!!! That is gorgeous!!!! I can only hope that mine turns out as good next week. I think I will go looking for the cast iron pan or something. WOW!!!! YOu could give lessons!

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: Gaelic Gardener
Replied on: Mar 01 2009 1:45:25 PM
Message:

Well, my baking day didn't go so well... Its the end of the third week since I started but only the first week of actual bubbly starter. My dough didn't rise after about 10 hours in the oven with the light on. I'll try again next week.....
--Kelly

“We can complain because rose bushes have thorns,
or rejoice because thorn bushes have roses.”
Abraham Lincoln


Reply author: Pat in Tenn
Replied on: Mar 01 2009 3:07:41 PM
Message:

Okay Ladies,

I have been reading the post here for quite some time today. I have had the magazine since it came out last month but just never could get myself to start the mother.

I have so far been making home-made bread with milling my hard wheat and doing it the "regular" way as one might say. I have used the old "friendship" bread starters before and had a lot of success with it. So, why not try this. I believe I might could do this. I mean, someone had to start the "starter" for all of the friendship breads somewhere, right?

I have not been here on-line with you all, posting, but have been looking and learning for quite sometime.

I look forward to learning more and sharing with you here.

Wish me luck !



Pat in Tenn
Born in the city but married to the country !


Reply author: Calicogirl
Replied on: Mar 01 2009 3:41:08 PM
Message:

Well, I made mine yesterday. Two grapefruit sized balls. They hardly rose and were extremely crusty and hard. The inside was nice though. My honey wants to try Sourdough Pancakes next week so he can make those :)

I will check out Ronna's recipe too :)

~Sharon

By His Grace, For His Glory


Reply author: campchic
Replied on: Mar 01 2009 3:54:12 PM
Message:

Julie- the index would be great!
I tried the pizza crust last night, it was awesome! It turned out nice and crispy, just the way we like it!

Erin

Farmgirl #190
www.concrete-and-grace.blogspot.com


Reply author: amberjsquirrel
Replied on: Mar 01 2009 5:31:09 PM
Message:

Thank you Julie for the advice.

I made the overnight waffles which were so good my 18 month old instantly learned the word "waffle" and asked for them the next morning!

My husband made the pizza dough and that was awesome, too. Thank you everyone for sharing recipes. I have cut and pasted each one.

Nice to meet you all!
Have a great day,
Amber


Reply author: ruralfarmgirl
Replied on: Mar 01 2009 5:37:07 PM
Message:

Gail
YUUUUMMMMY!
I was at the farm this past weekend and MaryJane had the most amazing "mother" sitting on the counter.... it smelled like "heaven"....

Rene~Prosser Farmgirl #185
http://farmchicksfarm.blogspot.com/http://renenaturallyspeaking.blogspot.com/



Circumstances made us FRIENDS; MaryJane's has made us SISTERS :)


Reply author: Meadowflower
Replied on: Mar 01 2009 6:03:11 PM
Message:

Hi all!

Wow I was so happy to see a picture of Gail's bread. It looked so nice!

My bread didn't come out well. The taste was fine. However, the bread was so very very very very dense. It wasn't cake-like or hardy looking like the sourdoughs I've bought in the supermarket. It looked very unattractive inside - like 10 pieces of cake all smashed together.

Could my baking powder have been bad/old? I don't know what else could have gone wrong. I also had made the pancakes the first week and they were like crepes - no rise.

I threw out the whole batch of starter and the bread. I didn't want to waste any more flour or cooking products trying again.

I'd like to try again if I can figure out what went wrong with this batch.

*~Lisa~*

My farmish blog: http://meadowflowerfarm.blogspot.com/


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 01 2009 6:47:21 PM
Message:

Lisa what bread recpe are you using because MaryJanes did not call for baking powder. But yes baking powder can go bad andshould be replaced every 6 months.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Quintessential Kate
Replied on: Mar 02 2009 05:08:05 AM
Message:

For those of you who have voiced dismay in going back throught all the pages of this thread to find a recipe, this is what I do. Every day when I look at the new posts, I copy and paste all the recipes of the day....that way I just have to go to my recipe folder in my documents. I actally have a sub folder for the sourdough recipes. They are all a click away. I have been doing this since the thread started.......and I must say, I have amassed quite a folder full. It's very convenient. My next project will be to put them on recipe cards. I have the perforated card stock. I think it would make a nice gift to give some starter, the "care and keep" instructions, and some recipes. I have started collecting old crockery bowls from estate sales...which will be part of the gift.
I used one of the biscuit recipes yesterday and they were wonderful. They were great for breakfast.........and just as delicious for lunch/supper.....as little sandwiches that were served with a veggie/beef soup I made Saturday.
Ciao, Kate

Heart of Texas
Chapter
AKA: Hot Farmgirl #234
http://quintessentialkate.blogspot.com

Today is my best day!


Reply author: GailMN
Replied on: Mar 02 2009 05:31:42 AM
Message:

Kate - what a great idea for a gift - I do the same with the recipes, only I am very new to this forum, so have quite a few pages to review. I did pick up a crockery bowl from a local antique shop the other day - it was for myself. I will be looking for more, I have a very good friend that recently retired, she happens to have a birthday coming up in a few weeks - guess what I'll be giving her! Thanks for an awesome gift idea.

Gail

Farmgirl Sister #506
A Smile a Day . . .


Reply author: AuntPammy
Replied on: Mar 02 2009 05:44:16 AM
Message:

Well, I haven't posted on here for a while but I have been making pizza dough with mine for the past several weeks and now it is a tradition. The boys know that Friday night is officially Pizza night and let me tell you it is delicious! Thank you so much for sharing the recipe...what a hit it has been. Hubby wants some more bread though so I am doubling the recipe this week so I can make him some loaves.



"Keep your face to the sunshine and you will never see the shadow." Helen Keller

www.auntpsalmostheaven.blogspot.com


Reply author: janiee
Replied on: Mar 02 2009 07:54:58 AM
Message:

I guess it was too cold Saturday in Texas to be baking bread. My dh and I got up to do it and left it on the stove , covered, with the warmer going and it never rose. the tast was wonderful but it was very dense...the crust was just right , the inside was the dense part..will try again on Wednesday (weather is supposed to be warmer) to see if it will rise better.
janiee
farmgirl #390


Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Mar 02 2009 07:58:12 AM
Message:

Great idea Kate....I think I will go back through this post and do that!

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: GailMN
Replied on: Mar 02 2009 08:09:38 AM
Message:

Sandra - I will save you the time - I am just about through the entire thread - I'm copying all the recipes to a file and I will send you the file when complete.

Gail


Farmgirl Sister #506
A Smile a Day . . .


Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Mar 02 2009 08:12:23 AM
Message:

Oh, Gail.....you are a sweetheart! Thank you SO MUCH! I think I'm going to double my starter since there are so many things I want to make and it's only one thing a week....I need more! LOL!

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 02 2009 08:13:49 AM
Message:

Okay here is an index of the recipes that have been posted so far. If I missed any let me know and I can add them. I know MaryJane has it in the back of her mind to put this all together into a collection of somesorts someday. I'll try to keep this list updated and reposted at least weekly.

MaryJane’s Bread Article ..........................................pg. 1

Baked French Toast with Apples and Nuts................pg. 12

Pancakes.....................................................................pg. 13

Sanfrancisco Style Bread (Ronna) ............................pg. 13

Old Fashioned Biscuits (celticheart) .........................pg. 17

Pancakes (celticheart) ...............................................pg. 17

Croutons....................................................................pg. 18

Waffles.....................................................................pg. 19

Buttermilk Biscuits ..................................................pg. 27

Whole Wheat Biscuits .............................................pg. 27

Basic Biscuits...........................................................pg. 27

Pizza Crust ..............................................................pg. 32

Bagels......................................................................pg. 43

English Muffins (Ronna).........................................pg. 45

Carrot Cake ............................................................ pg. 47

Bread Machine White Bread w/ added yeast..........pg. 49

Pecan/Date Bread....................................................pg. 51

Dog Treats..............................................................pg 53

Banana Cake (pearlgirl).........................................pg 54


Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Mar 02 2009 08:57:50 AM
Message:

Julie...thanks...you are right on top of things!

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: GailMN
Replied on: Mar 02 2009 09:39:10 AM
Message:

Happy Monday everyone! It is hard to believe that I only joined this forum and thread at page 54. I feel like I have been here a long time and everyone has been great. Just a few comments, I was fortunate and had great luck with my first "baking day". I used organic unbleached flour and distilled water. I did cover mine with a wet light weight dish towel (it is quit thin, since it has seen plenty of use). This may have led to the success of Mother, since I live in Minnesota and the furnace has been running quit a bit this winter, so the house tends to be dryer. My first loaf, baked only yesterday is gone. I take care of my 5 year old grandson during the week - this morning when he arrived he wanted "peanut butter bread", I had 2 slices of bread remaining - Griffin got one with peanut butter, and Grandpa got the other one with strawberry rhubarb jam. Griffin came back about 2 hours later wanting another slice of "peanut butter bread", I reached for a slice of homemade yeast bread, and was told no, I want that other bread. I told him I didn't have any left, but I would make more next week. He told me he didn't want any then, because my other bread was icky. Now I know my other bread is not icky, but I think he likes sourdough better, as does his Grandpa. I will be feeding Mother more this week, I need to bake more than 1 loaf of bread. So for all of you that are having a slower start - patience, it is worth the attempts and the wait. Thanks for being such an awesome group - and MaryJane, you have created a monster (a good one), I know Griffin will be asking me for "good" bread everyday until I bake again.

Gail

Farmgirl Sister #506
A Smile a Day . . .


Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Mar 02 2009 10:24:44 AM
Message:

Oh...how cute!!!! We may have to all pitch in and overnight some sourdough to little Griffin! Thanks for the motivation and inspiration Gail! You are a true farm girl and I think you just might win the MJ Butter's Sourdough Award for 2009!!!! Julie isn't eligible since she is the moderator for this thread. Tee! Hee!

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: urban farm girl
Replied on: Mar 02 2009 10:56:22 AM
Message:

Julie thanks for putting that out....I'm going to do the other recipes....well I tried with the new starter and no rise....must be me...I don't know....put it in a very warm room..I even turn up the heat more in the house....my husband has been walking around in a tank top and shorts. So I know its not cold in the house. Since I didn't get a rise I just went ahead and made bread sticks for spaghetti this week...they were good. I just wanted to be able to make the simple farm house bread but I look forward to trying the other recipes. Gail that was a cute story!


Reply author: kristin sherrill
Replied on: Mar 02 2009 6:44:21 PM
Message:

Well, I have a new favorite. I made the garlic-olive loaf and it is SO good! I love it. The flavor is amazing. I used kalamte (?) olives and the rosemary just sets it off. Very easy to make, too.

And thanks, Julie, for putting up all the recipes. I was writing down page numbers and I am not organized at all, so they are all over the place. So now I have them all on one page up on my bulletin board so I can add more when you creative cooks come up with more great recipes.

Kris

Turn your face to the sun and the shadows fall behind you. Maori proverb


Reply author: Teacher Mommy
Replied on: Mar 02 2009 8:46:21 PM
Message:

Uhgg... I got a mean flu virus this past Thursday and have been in bed asleep seemingly days on end! On the upside, my husband actually cleaned the whole house... first time in 20 years, I think. On the downside, I have neglected my starter for 4 days. I just looked the bowl when I was cooking this evening and the crusty stuff around the edge of the rim is moldy! Also, the starter had a rubbery crust on top. I though I might start again and went to toss the whole thing down the drain feeling that awful "flushing the goldfish down the drain" queasiness, when I got a good look at the actual core of the starter. It looks as it always has and smells like the same sweet and sour stuff. Do you think it is OK? I washed the bowl and am planning to replace what I saved of the old starter. I could make bread tomorrow since I am a bit better.

This does beg the question though... is it ever too old? Does a starter go bad and what are the signs? What happens if I DON'T make bread one weekend?
Linda


Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Mar 03 2009 06:29:58 AM
Message:

I think you can store it in the frig and/or take out the amount you're supposed to use and freeze it to use later or give away but confirm this with Julie or MJ because I am DEFINITELY no expert! Or Ronna...she's been doing this for a long time but I haven't seen her post on this thread for awhile. Where are you Ronna? You were such a great mentor along with Julie and Mary Jane....Ronna...you know it takes a village to "raise" a starter! LOL!
GLad you're feeling better Linda! Are you a REAL teacher? My daughter is too and even after teaching for 3-5 years now she still catches the stuff from the kids. They are little germ carriers they are! Julie's a teacher too!

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 03 2009 2:19:29 PM
Message:

Hi ones all, just another new member to the group. I found the magazine by accident last weekend at a Tractor Supply store when I stopped to see what they had for garden seeds. Just had to try doing the starter! I'm not a big chef and really haven't worked with yeast before so it is all a big trial and error to help pass the end of the winter months away.

I have be reading the forum and enjoying what everyone brings to the conversation. My mother starter is only on day 3, so still has a way to go. While reading I see that some of you have many of the same questions that I do about the starter, so I was doing a bit of research on the internet. King Arthur has some wonderful tips on their web pages for all things sourdough. They have recipes too. For the great tips and how to on storage and working with starter go to their education section and then select on the left side of the page the link to baking tips and primers. It is well written and answered a lot of my questions, so hope that someone else will enjoy. There are also tons of other sites out there that are worth reading and probably tons of books at your local library so I guess we'll all keep learning and sharing. I'm not as brave as some of you are when it comes to experiments in the kitchen, but I do so love to read of your success and tips.

lupine

www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: Calicogirl
Replied on: Mar 03 2009 2:32:16 PM
Message:

Could I ask for help?

This is week 2 for my starter. I baked Saturday and Sunday started doubling the flour and water added. Do I need to wait until this next coming Saturday to bake or can I use some starter now. I thought that Alee had posted something about using it twice but I went back about 20 pages and couldn't find it. My starter is doing much better this week and even more bubbly :)

I would appreciate any advice!

~Sharon

By His Grace, For His Glory


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 03 2009 2:46:28 PM
Message:

One other thing I wanted to ask of our more experienced bread bakers...I see a number of posts remarking that the bread was tough or hard (some very memorable descriptions that made me smile). Looking around at other bread baking information I see that some people add vital wheat gluten and or bread enhancers to recipes to improve the recipe results. Just wondering if anyone had tried this or had any further information.

From what I am reading these products are supposed to help improve the rise and texture of the bread, especially with whole wheat flours.

lupine


Reply author: gentlewoman farmer
Replied on: Mar 03 2009 2:52:33 PM
Message:

I don't know for sure, it seems that it took only 1 week to be ready. I have to wear plastic gloves when I make bread, any kind of bread. Once any part of my hands or arms touch the dough, something seems to kill the yeast or baking powder. Mother--n-law didn't believe me, so we did bread together, and mine didnt rise, but hers was doubled in size and puffy. I wear gloves when I take the biscuts out of the can.

Be good to yourself and be good to this earth.


Reply author: Catopia
Replied on: Mar 03 2009 3:24:15 PM
Message:

I am so excited to start making bread this way, I can hardly wait!!


Reply author: gramadinah
Replied on: Mar 03 2009 3:32:26 PM
Message:

I want to put my starter on hold for awhile so do I bake bread then feed then put in the fridge. Or just put it in the fridge and when do I feed it while it is in the fridge?

Diana


Farmgirl Sister #273


Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Mar 03 2009 3:46:53 PM
Message:

Welcome Lisa!!! Thank you for telling us about the other sites. I didn't even think to look elsewhere....maybe sometimes we have to go outside and "walk about" to discover new methods and tips! I hope we see you posting lots more! I think you'll like it here...these women are fabulous and so helpful.

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: Ronna
Replied on: Mar 03 2009 3:47:26 PM
Message:

I'm here, just trying to not confuse anyone with conflicting advise or opinions. More than happy to help when I can.
Diana, just put the starter in the fridge in a closed container and it will be fine until you want to use it again. At least I know what came from here is very hearty and forgiving even when it's neglected.
As to enhancers...mixed feelings on that by those who bake bread all the time. A tiny pinch of ginger will kick start rising, as will the same of ascorbic acid/Vitamin C. Vital wheat gluten is a help, but not if you're doing MaryJane's no knead bread, as you aren't developing gluten with kneading.
None of the above are used to any extent with sourdough, though nothing is writeen in stone and anything can be tried to see if you like the results.
No, starter does not go bad, there are some making rounds that are from the 1800's. No mold problems in Nevada, too dry here, but if mine were to get mold around the edges, I would try to salvage a spoonful from the center and feel very small amounts to get back to a useable amount. If it molds again in the process, I'd not take any chances. Black, pink and red are bad signs of contamination in your starter. Once you get a good one going, dry some in case of future problems. When I change the container, I let the residue dry completely and save it in a ziploc. I prefer to share mine wet, but would be easier and cheaper to mail in the dry form.
Hope I've helped a bit with your questions.


Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Mar 03 2009 4:00:41 PM
Message:

Oh, Ronna! Good to hear from you! So glad you're still around....remember, it's takes a village to raise a starter! Thanks for all your contributions....did you see where I made your SF Sourdough? I messed it up by putting both loaves on the same cookie sheet and ended up with siamese loaves but other than that it was delicious! Next week...week #3 I am trying MJ's farmhouse bread but think I'll go looking for a container first. Really good to see you back here...you were missed!

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: Bellepepper
Replied on: Mar 03 2009 4:03:39 PM
Message:

Finally found some organic flour. Had to make a run to Missouri so I could buy some KS milled flour. I have my favorite for making bread. The store had organic also but from Indiana not Kansas. You should have heard the people in the store asking why I was buying so much flour. 20 lb unbleached white, 20 lb whole wheat and 5 lb organic along with some stone ground corn meal. I said all that to say I am ready to start my "mother". But will wait until Sunday. Gonna be good!!


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 03 2009 5:13:35 PM
Message:

Thanks for the wonderful welcome and the answers to my questions. I think that the draw to working with "mother" and the bread is that it isn't an exact science and a bit more like gardening. Centuries of wisdom, the support of a good group, and the unique results that each of us get in our work just makes it so much more fun. No mass production here!

I am getting the feeling that the process of working with a starter is very free-form and really an art form. It seems to take a sense of adventure and a carefree lack of fear to succeed. We will all tweak and perfect methods and wisdom we get from each other to make our results better just as generations before us did. Can't wait to start trying some baking! Mother is bubbling away down in the kitchen.

To some of you that wondered about temperature. My home is kept at about 58 to 60 degrees with central heating during the winter months. My house is old and not perfectly airtight either. However, the starter seems to be fairing out just fine at this temperature. I have been using a slightly damp towel over my bowl because the house is quite dry this time of year. Once the furnace isn't running so much, I'll probably wean it off that to a dry covering or the refrigerator. The temperature may become more of a concern once I get to the baking stage and need to have the dough rise. I'll let you know how that works out. My friend suggested that I put my bread into the oven to rise (with the power off) and put a bowl of warm water under it if the cold seemed to be a problem.


Reply author: GailMN
Replied on: Mar 03 2009 5:31:53 PM
Message:

OK Ronna I am really a newbie to sourdough. Your hint about saving some dry starter is very good advice. I am on week two with Mother and all looks good so far, I am feeding double for a few days to boost the amount I can use on Saturday - my first loaf disappeared way too fast. I too am having problems locating flour - going to a food coop in a neighboring town this weekend, hopefully I will have luck there. Thanks to everyone for all the tips. Happy Baking.

Gail


Farmgirl Sister #506
A Smile a Day . . .


Reply author: Calicogirl
Replied on: Mar 03 2009 6:05:59 PM
Message:

I'm reposting, my question I think got overlooked :)

Could I ask for help?

This is week 2 for my starter. I baked Saturday and Sunday started doubling the flour and water added. Do I need to wait until this next coming Saturday to bake or can I use some starter now. I thought that Alee had posted something about using it twice but I went back about 20 pages and couldn't find it. My starter is doing much better this week and even more bubbly :)

I would appreciate any advice!



~Sharon

By His Grace, For His Glory


Reply author: Teacher Mommy
Replied on: Mar 03 2009 7:27:32 PM
Message:

I posted last night that my starter went untended and unused for about four days and got mold on the edge of the bowl. I thought I could save it by reserving part of it and feeding it again. But, when I woke up this morning. I "peeked under the hood" and saw little blue pockets of mold floating on top... I'm going to go on record saying that mold is a bad sign. It makes sense, since mold is spread by spores, that if you see it anywhere, chances are it's everywhere. Next time I'll know that if I'm unable to care for the starter, I'll just pop it the fridge. However that makes me curious about "Calicogal," Sharon's question, Do I have to feed it in the fridge? Do I do it before?

I think I'll be smarter this time and just make pancakes until the starter matures for a couple weeks.

Hi Sandra! Yes, I am a teacher. I've been teaching kindergarten now for several years, but I have taught a total of 24 years. I'm a third generation teacher and my 8-year-old daughter already says she wants to be a teacher. No joke, she actually tries to remember ways of doing things and projects so she can do them "when she is a teacher!" Teaching must be something that gets in the blood and stays there. I hear farming is the same way! As far as the germs go, your daughter is just about done with the trial by fire years! I got much less sick after 5 years and now I hardly ever get sick.


Reply author: Teacher Mommy
Replied on: Mar 03 2009 7:36:06 PM
Message:

OOps, sorry! I guess that was Gramadinah's question about feeding in he fridge!
Linda


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 03 2009 7:39:47 PM
Message:

Sharon if you have extra available you ate welcom to use it any day of the week. Just don't forget to give her a day of rest once a week. I'll try to get back with the rest of you tomorrow. I have the flu and have been in bed all day!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Mar 03 2009 8:51:58 PM
Message:

Sharon- One thing I would like to add is to feed the day before, take out your baking amount, then feed for that day. You want to bake with "hungry" sourdough otherwise your flour to sourdough ratio is mixed up for the recipe.

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: Calicogirl
Replied on: Mar 03 2009 8:57:41 PM
Message:

Thank you Julie and Alee!

Julie, I hope you will be feeling better soon! :)

~Sharon

By His Grace, For His Glory


Reply author: gramax18
Replied on: Mar 03 2009 9:47:39 PM
Message:

Alee, A long time ago you showed us the jar you bought to put your "Mother" in. Well I was on a trip and was able to find an old clear glass cookie jar and it is just right for my starter.
Thanks for the idea. Also my bread is working very well. While I was on the trip I put the starter in the frig and when I got home just took it out the night before I started to feed it again.

Thanks ladies for all of the help.

Elinor


Reply author: nin1952
Replied on: Mar 04 2009 1:16:09 PM
Message:

HURRAY! I have BREAD today! I have been trying since January 26th. Sallie Mae finally come through. I used the Farmhouse Bread recipe but I tweeked it just a little bit. Instead of honey I added 1 TBL plus 1/4 tsp granulated sugar and I also sifted my flour with the salt added to it. I also broke down and bought a cast iron saucepot. Maybe all of this was unnecessary but it worked. It has a pretty brown top and it tastes great. I can't wait for my husband to get home to try it. (My 10 year old grandson, Cason, Liked it.)(All Smiles!)

Donna


Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Mar 04 2009 1:35:04 PM
Message:

Donna...you go girl! Your perseverance paid off and you motivated the rest of us to "hang in there"!
Thanks!
Julie.....hope you're feeling better today.

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Mar 04 2009 2:36:01 PM
Message:

Elinor- I bet your glass jar is fabulous! What a find!

Congrats Donna!

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: Sewsmartie
Replied on: Mar 04 2009 2:41:47 PM
Message:

Well, I lost my post as Yahoo timed out. So thanks to Julie for the index of recipes. I appreciate it so much. I may just try a 3rd time and hope for the sucess I have not yet had. Very disappointing!

Just received a back issue for October-November. Hope to find something wonderful in it. My local newsstand does not get too many copies of the magazine so I have now subscribed!

Really hope that my luck with the bread improves! Like the mother starter I just keep on going, bubbles and all! My starter is now in its 3rd week. I just want to be able to make "soup bowls" like Panera has for soup.

Still hopeful, but fast becoming doubtful!

Sewsmartie


Reply author: GailMN
Replied on: Mar 05 2009 06:39:20 AM
Message:


Good Morning everyone. Just wanted to post a quick update on "Mother". I have learned so much from this thread, so maybe my experience will help someone else as well.

I am in week two, Saturday will be my baking day - I was very successful with my first baking attempt, so this week I am increasing the amount of "Mother". I was a little nervous about adding more, didn't want to upset "Mother", but all is well. "Mother" is very active and healthy. I fed about an hour ago, and already she is as bubbly as ever with a pleasant beer aroma. This week I plan to make pancakes and bread of some sort, have not yet decided. My neighbor would also like me to share "Mother", so I will do that as well, but that may have to wait until next week.

I used organic unbleached white whole wheat flour to start and feed, but I use regular flour when I bake. I would use organic, but have not found larger packages in my area, hope to find a store where I can get at least 10 pound and stock up. I also use distilled water and I store the container by a heat vent in my kitchen, "Mother" seems to thrive on the warm water. I keep my bowl covered with a damp towel at all times, I am in Minnesota and my furnace runs a lot, so the house even though humidified is on the dry side.

I'm looking forward to Saturday and PANCAKES!

Gail

Farmgirl Sister #506
A Smile a Day . . .


Reply author: Pat in Tenn
Replied on: Mar 05 2009 09:05:48 AM
Message:

Hey Ladies,

Just checking in with all !! I am enjoying reading about everyone's progress. I was unable to get my organic flour yesterday while shopping. The store did not carry any. I will have to go somewhere else to find some. I know it is in the area, I just was not at the right store yesterday.

I will keep reading here and hope to get my flour by the week-end.

***Donna-- I am so happy for you. I have been reading about your trials with this.


Pat in Tenn
Born in the city but married to the country for over 22 yrs !
http://onlybygodsgrace.blogspot.com/
http://www.homesteadblogger.com/inhishands/


Reply author: AnnaCarolina
Replied on: Mar 05 2009 09:38:36 AM
Message:

Hi Everyone! I am brand new to MaryJane and sourdough. I bought my first copy of the magazine a few weeks ago -- attracted by the lovely graphics AND the promise of fast, easy artisan bread. I started my mother last week, encounted a few questions, and found my way here.

Long story short -- after a few promising, bubbly days, mother started to fizzle. Big bubbles turned into tiny bubbles. It still smelled "alive" so I baked a loaf anyway. Got a wonderful smelling kitchen-- and a flat dense brick of bread. And a very disappointed husband :-( I tried resuscitating her for a few days, but finally gave up on her. She's now at peace in the compost pile.

I would love to try again, but honestly don't have time to read through all the comments here. After reading the first 15 pages, I finally skipped to the end. I think it would be tremendously helpful if the editors could sift through all of the tips offered on this site and rewrite the recipe. What do you think?

My guess is mother started failing when the weather turned cold last week. We live in Western North Carolina and tend to keep the heat turned down. Our house can get cool at times. I remember my Mom (not to be confused with "mother") baking yeast bread and being very fussy about keeping the dough "cozy" during the rise. I thought sourdough would be heartier, able to survive sojourns west in covered wagons... I guessed wrong?

I did find King Arthur Unbleached Bread Flour -- not organic. I thought "organic" referred to growing methods. Are there organic milling techniques also?

Could altitude affect results? Dry dishtowel, wet dishtowel? I went for the free form loaf. Directions said to let the dough rise on the baking sheet covered with thin dishtowel. Again back to Mom's yeast bread; she always let the dough rise in a bowl. My dough spread out (a little) on the cookie sheet during the 8 hour rise. I wonder if it were in a bowl would it have risen up instead of spread out?

So, what do you think? Should Mary Jane reprint the recipe with a few more tips? Also, in the magazine, it would be nice if the directions were spelled out in one spot "recipe style," in addition to more detailed instruction included in the text. Your magazine is absolutely beautiful and I'm looking forward to the next issue!

life is good


Reply author: Quintessential Kate
Replied on: Mar 05 2009 10:42:44 AM
Message:

Hi Anna.......welcome to the farm!!
I think many of us were unsuccessful the first few weeks of starting our start. Seems like everybody has a starter that acts a bit different from the others, but they ALL take time. Mine, for example, took almost a month before I got the quintessential artisan loaf. I keep my house on the cool/cold side....so, like many others, I put mine in the oven with the light on while it rises. It has been suggested that for the first "bake" or two, one might rather make sourdough pancakes while the start is maturing. Ronna's San Francisco style bread on page 13 of this thread is a good bread to make when first starting out also.
My start is now about 2 months old....and it's pretty humid here so I only wet my towel every couple of days....where others, in other parts of the country are having to wet their towel every day...and sometimes twice per day. There are so many variables that it would be impossible to cover all the "if's". Most importantly is patience...as I said, I didn't get my beautiful loaf for almost a month........BUT it was so worth it.
I have noticed that when it's really cold my start is not as active....but she's a voracious eater, and if I check her about 45 minutes to an hour after feeding her, she's bubbling like crazy. I've gotten to the point where she is a forgiving thing....and I find that I'm not babying her like I did when I first started. She's happy, well fed, always has a clean place to live.....and pays us well for her room and board.
I hope you give it another try......because the payoff is well worth it. I plan on keeping "Ma" around for a long time.
Again, welcome to the Farm!!
Ciao, Kate


Heart of Texas
Chapter
AKA: Hot Farmgirl #234
http://quintessentialkate.blogspot.com

Today is my best day!


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 05 2009 12:10:32 PM
Message:

Anna, I too was a bit overwhelmed by the size of the forum at first when I joined at page 57. What I found helped was to sit down and take it a few pages at a time over a cup of coffee. Set a small goal of reading a few pages each time you sit down and as someone suggested take notes on things or use cut & paste to glean out the things that interest you. Later you can look over the notes you took and work with them.

Please don't be discouraged. There are many great members here that are willing to help and lend support.

I'm just a newbie, but it sounds like your starter was doing fine. It just was young. Like a child, it needed more time to mature. Disappointment seems to be a theme that I keep coming across from the reading that I have done this week on the subject of sourdough starter. The cause? We are more impatient and set a different value on our time than our ancestors did. Working with wild yeast isn't the same as the experience of working with packaged yeast. Sourdough is an investment in your future joy. Like a bank account. Each week you invest $5. At the end of the first week you won't have your first million, but your are $35 closer to your goal.


Reply author: AnnaCarolina
Replied on: Mar 05 2009 12:46:00 PM
Message:

...Poor mother! perhaps I tossed her into the heap too soon!

Thanks! Your response is helpful and hopeful! I'll do a little more reading try again!



life is good


Reply author: Suzan
Replied on: Mar 05 2009 3:22:05 PM
Message:

Anna, It definitely takes Mother some time to mature. My first few loaves were flat and dense also. Try the cinnamon raisin bread MJ included in the article, I had more success with that at first. And it is delicous!


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 05 2009 5:02:15 PM
Message:

Have to share my "funny" with all of you. Recently have been neglecting my housework more than usual due to some health problems. Also the house has a bit of the closed up winter blues smell to it. Tonight I got a call from a lady that wants to visit on Sunday for the first time to bring her basset hound over to meet mine for a possible breeding. After I hung up there was that minute of panic that I need to get things caught up before then and get rid of the closed house smell! I'm sure that is a feeling that some of you know well, lol. Then I walked into the kitchen and looked at "mother". Sunday will be baking day! Woohoo! If that can't chase away the closed up house smell, nothing will. "Mother" saves the day!


Reply author: Liz103811
Replied on: Mar 05 2009 5:13:27 PM
Message:

I love having a Reuben sandwich on St. Patrick's Day. Do you have any suggestions for making a pumpernickel bread the Mary Jane Way?


Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Mar 05 2009 5:41:13 PM
Message:

Lisa....I LOVE it when a plan comes together! That's great!!!!

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: gramax18
Replied on: Mar 05 2009 9:26:42 PM
Message:

I heard Elton Brown on food network last night say that wild yeast and sourdough are like having a pet. "They need to be looked after every day." But I say they are like a puppy that needs to grow up before it does what you want it too do.
Keep working at it.

Elinor


Reply author: Quintessential Kate
Replied on: Mar 06 2009 05:21:32 AM
Message:

Great analogy Elinor!!! Kinda like kids too...... or a young husband.......the list goes on!!!

Ciao, Kate

Heart of Texas
Chapter
AKA: Hot Farmgirl #234
http://quintessentialkate.blogspot.com

Today is my best day!


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 06 2009 07:44:15 AM
Message:

Hi Everyone! I have been VERY sick with the flu this week! I was finally up and around last night a little and am feeling mostly back to myself today! I am sorry I have missed so many conversations and questions! I will do my best to get them all answered throughout today and this weekend. If I overlook your question please let me know! I don't want to miss anybody!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 06 2009 07:50:48 AM
Message:

Linda - mold is a tough issue and everyone has a different opinion about it and about what is too much mold or "just a little so it wont hurt". I would suggest you do what you feel is right for you on that issue. The "rubbery crust" is usually an indication that your starter is starting to dry. A moist towel on top or a little extra water when feeding will take care of the problem. If you continually feed the starter it wont get too old. Some starters in some bakeries have actually been around for 100's of years!!! If you don't bake everyweek it is OKAY! I would suggest that you try to remove the excess starter that is built up within a week or so by doing a double recipe on your next baking day or by discarding it.

Lisa - Welcome to the forum! We look forward to your contributions!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 06 2009 07:57:45 AM
Message:

Sharon - If you are doubling your amount in feeding and your starter is at least a week old you will be able to use the excess at any time!

Lisa - I have read a little bit about "bread enhancers" but haven't used them nor do I know much about them. If you have any information I would love to hear it!

Ronna and Sam - thanks for chiming in and for your advice. Thanks Ronna about the info on enhancers. I have a question for you. I have read that salt can disrupt the rise of yeast. What do you know about this?



Judy - That is SO interesting! I wonder if that would help some of the rest of us who had issues with the yeast seamingly not working! I wonder what would cause that!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 06 2009 08:08:44 AM
Message:

Hi Anna - My understanding is that MaryJanes intent is to eventually do more with this whole bread thing than just an article or a web forum. She mentions possibly doing a whole BOOK based on this technique and the recipes using it. In many ways we are helping to research this for her by posting about it here on the forum. Right now we are really building on a technique rather than a recipe. I know the forum can be overwhelming. If you have any questions, please post them. I will be happy to answer them again! Also - I experimented with three types of flour. The KA All Purpose, The KA Bread Flour and MaryJanes farm flour. I was REALLY disappointed with the KA Bread Flour. EVERY loaf I tried to make with it came out gummy in the middle even when cooked to temperature. It has to do with the gluten content of the flour and the fact that this is a no knead bread. I would recommend that you switch to the KA All Purpose flour rather than the Bread flour.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 06 2009 08:11:04 AM
Message:

Liz - I'm working on a recipe I'd like to try for Pumpernickle. I will try to work on it this weekend and homefully post early next week so you can make it for St. Pats day!

If I missed any of your questions let me know!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Calicogirl
Replied on: Mar 06 2009 08:26:36 AM
Message:

Thank you Julie! I do hope you will continue to get better soon! :)

~Sharon

By His Grace, For His Glory


Reply author: Ronna
Replied on: Mar 06 2009 09:09:38 AM
Message:

Julie, yes, salt retards the yeast action. I honestly do not know how much difference this makes using a starter and no yeast. I put the salt in the last cup of flour, so it's not forgotten and is mixed in after the initial amount of flour. On the other hand, sugar increases yeast action as well as a pinch of ginger or ascorbic acid crystals (can crush a vitamin C tablet and use just a pinch).
If you mix a bread dough and sweet roll dough at the same time, the extra sugar in the sweet dough will rise the dough twice as much.
Glad you're feeling better now. Lots of illness going around all over the USA.


Reply author: LivingWell4You
Replied on: Mar 06 2009 09:29:23 AM
Message:

I'm jumping in here with a question. I began my starter two weeks ago tomorrow. My previous attempt failed but this one is going great. Last week I made pancakes with the starter using Julie's recipe and they were fantastic. This week I'm going to try Marcia's recipe. I would like to be able to make a batch of pancakes AND a loaf of bread each week.

My question is: can I use the existing starter and double that batch or do I need to start a double batch from scratch? If I can use the existing one, how do I do it? Add 2/3 cups flour and 1/2 cup water every day next week or do I need to use the initial day 1 amounts tomorrow plus 1/3 cup flour and 1/4 cup water?

Thanks for your help. Julie, I'm glad you're feeling better. Having the flu can be absolutely miserable.

God bless -
Karen ~ Farmgirl Sister #311
www.livingwell4you.blogspot.com
www.heritagehillsfarm.blogspot.com

"To own a little bit of ground, to scratch it with a hoe, to plant seeds and watch the renewal of life - this is the commonest delight of the race, the most satisfactory thing a man can do." Charles Dudley Warner


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 06 2009 09:59:00 AM
Message:

You can just add extra to your existing batch. You can do the 2/3 flour and 1/2 cup water all at once in the morning or you can start doing a feeding in the morning and in the evening. After a week if you don't want to continue doubling just go back to the original amounts.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Mar 06 2009 10:58:23 AM
Message:

Julie....SO glad you are feeling better! You poor thing....it's those germy kids I tell ya! They are sweeties but they are germy! You take good care of yourself and get your rest! And eat more sourdough...supposed to be good for the immune system.
Hugs from a distance (I don't want to catch it!) LOL!
Love ya..........

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: LivingWell4You
Replied on: Mar 06 2009 11:49:17 AM
Message:

Thanks, Julie

God bless -
Karen ~ Farmgirl Sister #311
www.livingwell4you.blogspot.com
www.heritagehillsfarm.blogspot.com

"To own a little bit of ground, to scratch it with a hoe, to plant seeds and watch the renewal of life - this is the commonest delight of the race, the most satisfactory thing a man can do." Charles Dudley Warner


Reply author: urban farm girl
Replied on: Mar 06 2009 1:37:45 PM
Message:

Julie welcome back to the living lol...sorry to hear about you with the flu. Well maybe the temp. has something to do with it for me at least. Chicago has been in the 60's today and when I came home from work and checked on my "mother" Very bubbly...Yeah...the other day I made the basic biscuits very very good... I was pleased. Man I can't believe a starter for a hundred years..WOW! This weekend I'm trying the other recipes I have doubled the starter so hopefully it will turn out good.


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 06 2009 5:15:35 PM
Message:

Thanks for all your well wishes everyone! I LOVE to eat and considering I ate only 10 saltine crackers over the course of two days is saying something!!! Being a teacher I know I am usually in for one bad buggie every year but this was awful. We have had so many kids out of school with it too. At least I wasn't suffering alone! Heehee. We hit 78 today and the same is expected for tomorrow. That is a wonderful and welcome change! Happy baking to those of you who will be doing so tomorrow.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: GailMN
Replied on: Mar 07 2009 07:19:21 AM
Message:

Good Morning! Baking day today, yahoo! I made pancakes this morning - they were fabulous. They looked good, they smelled good, they TASTED good. This is week two for me. I fed "Mother" extra during the week because I wanted to make pancakes and bread. I have a question - how much "Mother" do I need to reserve to keep her going healthy and strong. If I make bread, I will be left with about 3/4 cup of "Mother", is that enough to keep her thriving? I appreciate your help. Thank you.

Gail


Farmgirl Sister #506
A Smile a Day . . .


Reply author: Farmers Daughter
Replied on: Mar 07 2009 07:56:12 AM
Message:

First of all thanks to Julie for posting the page numbers of the recipes You have saved all of us a lot of searching time.

Well my mother is almost 3 weeks old now and boy what a difference time does make. I was very happy with her performance before, but now with the weather getting warmer and her kicking it up a notch I know what she really can do.

My first week she was slightly bubbly and kept her own. Never had a smell except for wet flour. When baking day came I had decided to give the recipe on page 13 a try (the one you add yeast to) just because I was afraid if I didn't I would end up with a flat doorstop. Seemed like everyone was having a rising issue on the first week or so. With our house being on the cool side just wanting to give my bread an extra boost. Made 2 free form loves on a stone. Turn out well and was happy with that.

Second week wasn't sure that she was truly ready for the task yet but we were in this together and I was going to do all I could so that she do her job. Followed the Mary Jane recipe. Seemed to me the dough was a little stiff. But didn't add any extra liquid. Put the dough in one of my old metal pans. Don't have a cast iron one. Loved the look of the free form loaves last week, but wanted more lift and height so we could make sandwiches. Placed the bread in the oven covered with a flour sack towel. Placed a pot of boiling water on the bottom rack (this is what I always have done when rising dough-read it in an Amish cookbook some time back) and closed the door. I had done all I could to give her a warm cozy place to do her magic. After about an hour or so. I turned on the light and look through the window, could see just a little pooch under the towel. Something was going on. After 4 hours went back to check and she had pushed up above the sides and was ready to bake. Took the towel off and made slits on the top.( Think I really should have slit the top before rising, because it flattened a bit)While baking I had checked the bread and thought it was done, top was brown and sounded hollow, but when I inserted the thermometer it wasn't ready yet so waited till it reached the right temp.(if I would have taken it out it surly would have had a gummy center.) I did how ever cover with a foil tent cause it was getting brown. Once done I placed on the cooling rack. Within a few minutes my hubby already had the butter on the counter and knife in hand hovering over it. After fussing that we should wait a bit. Well heck we both were enjoying a piece. The loaf ended up high enough to use in the toaster and for sandwiches. I was very pleased.

I will bake for the third time tomorrow. Since I stated my starter on a Monday I am off the magazine schedule. I plan to make the Mary Jane recipe again this week. And will start to double my feedings in order to try some of those wonderful recipes you all have shared. Ever since I seen the pictures of the pizza I haven't been able to get that out of my head PIZZA CRUST! Will be doing that soon.

Thanks again to everyone. By sharing your experiences and mishap along the way it has really help keep all of us going. We can never give up on our mothers. Heck if we did what would we talk about?

Happy Baking to all~ DiAnn


Reply author: Deni
Replied on: Mar 07 2009 11:34:39 AM
Message:

Good to know you're better Julie! Being sick is the pits.

I decided to try some rosemary foccacia to go with split pea soup today. My friend, Jeanie, said I should punch down the dough before forming into loaves - that, and the addition of olive oil, are this week's experiments.

The sky is threatening but the temperature amazing. Yay Spring!



sunshinedreamkitchen.blogspot.com


Reply author: Ronna
Replied on: Mar 07 2009 1:13:35 PM
Message:

quote from another list on Italian breads not having salt.

statement on Italian breads often lacking
salt, there is a very interesting story behind their being salt
less. In Umbria and Tuscany (regions of current Italy) salt is left
out of most breads traditionally. It has nothing to do with how it
is eaten or with what foods. Rather the salt was left out in protest
of the taxation of salt by the Pope (one of the "Urbans" but I cannot
remember now which one). There was a very stiff tax on salt. The
tax was collected to reduce the debt of the Vatican which at the time
was involved in wars. So you see, the lack of salt was sort of like
our Boston Tea Party. It was an early form of tax protest.


Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Mar 07 2009 3:00:28 PM
Message:

Hi Ronna! Good to hear that! If the economy gets any worse I may have to leave out the salt too....and the flour, and the water...LOL! My bread is "rising" I hope. I made MJ's Farmhouse bread today. Boy, that is easy to prepare for sure! I put it in a clay bread pan that I soaked in water for 10 minutes then buttered then put parchment paper in. I hope I covered all the bases. I am still holding out for finding a cast iron saucepan with a lid at a thrift store or garage sale...I know "good luck"! I put the bread in the oven to rise with a pan of hot water underneath it. I have no oven light...well, I do but I can't figure out how to get to it and it is burnt out. I was late getting my bread made up because I had to go to the thrift this morning with a friend so I may be up late tonight. It went in at 3:15 so hopefully I can bake it at 9:15 or else 11:15. Good luck to all who are baking today!

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: mimilou
Replied on: Mar 07 2009 3:19:02 PM
Message:

I made the cinnamon raisin bread today and it was fantastic! I think as more people find out that Saturday is bread day - I may have more & more people showing up...

I would like to bake twice a week. Can I add extra to my existing mother and, if so, what's the proper procedure. Thanks in advance!

This is such a great project with very little effort - amazing!!


Reply author: kristin sherrill
Replied on: Mar 07 2009 4:17:09 PM
Message:

I made the dog treats the other day. They seem to like them. But they are a little too hard for the 2 that are almost 12. I think they need a softer biscuit type for their old teeth now. But the 2 year old lad loves them.

Kris

Turn your face to the sun and the shadows fall behind you. Maori proverb


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 07 2009 4:43:13 PM
Message:

WEll it sounds like we had a successful day all around! Great job girls!

Gail - 3/4 a cup will be pleanty in reserve! As long as you have a little left over that will help get the yeast active eating the new food you feed it.

Kristin - these biscuits are intended to be hard, however, if you cut back on the baking time they will be FINE to serve your dogs and they will be much softer. Baking them until very hard removes most of the water and allows them to be stored a little longer. If you do cut back on the bakinf time you will want to make sure that your dogs consume them all in a few days before mold takes over.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 07 2009 4:47:01 PM
Message:

Oops! MAylou - I didn't mean to over look your question. If you want to bake twice in one week you need to double your starter. Rather than adding 1/3 cup flour and 1/4 cup water daily you need to increase this to 2/3 cup flour and 1/2 cup of water. This can all be added at once each morning or you can feed half in the morning and half at night. What ever works best for you. Once you double you will eaither be able to make two recipes on the same day or bake twice during the week. If you find it to be too much one week and dont think you will double bake then just decrease back to 1/3 flour and 1/4 cup water.

Hope that doesn't confuse you!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: GailMN
Replied on: Mar 07 2009 5:21:26 PM
Message:

Thanks Julie, I figured I would be ok with 3/4 cup reserve, but did not want to tempt fate. I did end up making the Sourdough Carrot Cake instead of bread as originally planned. The Carrot Cake is so good, for those of you that have not made this yet, I wish you could have smelled it as it baked. My husband insisted on a second piece, he said he really couldn't tell if it was good or not with only one piece. I am having so much fun with sourdough. Just have to keep "Mother" happy and thriving. Thanks for all your help Julie.

Farmgirl Sister #506
A Smile a Day . . .


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 07 2009 8:15:37 PM
Message:

Well I'm pleased to report that I didn't make a doorstop! LOL Used the recipe for the cinnamon raisin out of the magazine and omitted the raisins and added some extra cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice and fresh ginger for one loaf for my son & his wife. Did it in a glass loaf pan and used the "tuck it into a steamy microwave method" to rise. The rise was surprisingly good for a young mother. Turned out pretty well for a 1st week and a 1st attempt. I do admit that it probably would have gone much better with some extra patience. It was too easy to over watch it and over think it. The inside was slightly moist and tasty and the crust was crispy.

My second loaf is more of a free form take on the cinnamon raisin loaf. Had it out to rise on the counter covered all afternoon, but the rise was hardly noticeable. My house is just too cool I think (about 58 degrees). Decided to wait to bake that one until morning. Put it into the almost cool oven with some hot water and will see what the morning brings.


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 08 2009 06:36:59 AM
Message:

Gail - my husband claimed that carrot cake sounded "gross" when I was making it. He also doesn't like cream cheese so he was certain he wasn't going to like the frosting. I FINALLY convinced him to try a piece and I promise you he ate half the cake!

Lisa - I really think there is something to be said about temperature and humidity in the house. Typically when the weather is cool we keep out heat off during the day while we are at work and at turned down to 60 while we sleep. We only heat the house from about 4 to 10 every day and then we only heat to 68. Well this week the temperature got close to 80 4 days. We didn't turn on the heat in the house and it has been sitting between 72 and 75 for the last few days. The humidity is up in the house a little too. I also opened my windows every afternoon and my starters are looking AMAZING! They look the best they ever have. I am baking today so I am anbxious to see how it goes.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Mar 08 2009 07:20:01 AM
Message:

Well....guess what I forgot last night....that my bread was rising in the oven!!!! Oh well....it's still there this morning and doesn't look like it rose very much but the oven is preheating and I'll give it a go!

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: GailMN
Replied on: Mar 08 2009 08:23:52 AM
Message:

Julie - my husband would have eaten more of the cake had I let him, but he is diabetic, so I have to ration his portions and then put the rest under lock and key LOL.

Sam/Sandra - my first go at bread I let rise overnight - even if it doesn't look as you would like, I bet it will taste great!

Gail

Farmgirl Sister #506
A Smile a Day . . .


Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Mar 08 2009 08:40:28 AM
Message:

Gail...you ARE so right....just got through eating 4 pieces of it!!!! It cooked the 20 minutes and I took its temp and put it in for another 10 and it was perfectly done in and out. A beautiful golden crust....it did not raise much, like maybe only 2 inches high but girlfriends....it was DELICIOUS! Wow! I can't get over it...I was wondering if my "Lizzie" was fading on me but she isn't! That bread is SOUR! I love the flavor myself and I'm so glad I "forgot it" last night because what a treat it was this morning! I imagine with time and patience I will get a larger loaf that could actually make slices of bread. These are fairly short but I usually cut my sandwiches in half so who's complaining?!?!? These slices are just right for me.
Thank you everyone for posting on here because I DID try MJ's recipe before from her Idea Book and had no luck whatsoever but because of the support of Mary Jane and all of the rest of you and the "handholding", I am now enjoying a very special and satisfying food that I know I will continue to make for the rest of my life. Thank you to all of you!!! But expecially thank you to my "Lizzie".

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 08 2009 08:57:42 AM
Message:

The funny part is that my starter has looked great even with the cooler house. It has produced lots of bubbles and no mold problems. The delays only came in the rise before baking part. However, when I looked over the magazine article again last night she does point out again that we are working on a slow rise process and not something artificially stimulated by commercial yeasts. So, I have chalked it up to another lesson in patience.

The nice weather that you've been having sounds wonderful! We had a break here this week too. One day it got to almost 60 but mostly in the mid-40s during the days. The snow is nearly gone and the mud is thriving,lol. The sunshine has been wonderful! Days are getting longer. Looking forward to being out in the gardens!



http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: jpbluesky
Replied on: Mar 08 2009 09:07:38 AM
Message:

Well, I baked my third loaf.....added a little sugar this time to cut the sour. It tasted better, but still did not rise at all. So it is a little flat and gummy in the middle. Will keep trying. This time I let it rise on top of the stove with the overhead light shining on it, covered in a glass pan. Different that before with using the cast iron and the oven light. But no difference.....I have to figure out how to get it to rise!

Farmgirl Sister # 31

www.blueskyjeannie.blogspot.com

Psalm 51: 10-13


Reply author: GailMN
Replied on: Mar 08 2009 10:16:09 AM
Message:

The first time I made bread, I let it rise for 18 hours - I put it in my pan at noon on a Saturday, thought I could bake around 10 p.m., but had very little rise, so I left it overnight, and in the morning it had doubled - so if you can manage it, don't be too anxious. I'm on my third week and am feeding double - if it were just hubby and me I would be ok with the original starter, but I have all these grandkids that have figured out already that Grandma makes good stuff on Saturday. I'm going to fool them though and try to make something on Wednesday and Saturday this week, my "Mother" seems to be very healthy, I think I can double dip this week. We'll see. I just knew your bread would taste good Sam - hope you are all having a lovely Sunday.

Gail

Farmgirl Sister #506
A Smile a Day . . .


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 08 2009 11:06:11 AM
Message:

Time is definitely the difference in the rise! My 2nd loaf (the freeform one) sat rather unhappy all day yesterday (covered with a damp cloth) until I decided to let it have a go at the rise in the steamy oven (the oven off and a bowl of boiling water method) overnight. Finally baked that one late this morning. It had more than doubled in size by having patience. Tastes wonderful. Had a slice of it with coffee and you really know you had something. Not the "hummingbird buzz" of empty carbs or the "lump in your stomach" but rather a satisfied feeling.

Thanks for the tip that was posted about making the tin foil tent to avoid burning the crust! That worked great for the last few minutes while the internal temperature was climbing. Crust is still nice and cruchy but the taste is better that way.

For the bread baking novice the thermometer is a must! I'd have taken the loaves out far sooner than they should have with out the guidance provided. This coming from a woman that nearly never sets a timer for anything and measures loosely like your great grandmother did, lol!

The free form and larger loaves definitely take a lot of patience or the ability to forget them if you want them to rise beyond flatbread. I think if you wanted a quick bread fix and didn't have the time to plan, small loaves or roll size would be better.

http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: ParisKnight
Replied on: Mar 08 2009 11:47:14 AM
Message:

Honey Wheat Oatmeal Bread

Yesterday was my baking day with my three week old mother and this is what I came up with.

3/4 cup milk
3/4 cup oats
1/2 cup honey
3/4 t salt
2 cups mother
1 cup white flour
1/2 cup wheat flour

Put oats in small bowl
Heat milk till steaming and pour over oats.
Allow oats to cool 15 minutes or so
Into large bowl add two cups mother
Add salt and honey to mother and stir
Add oat/milk mixture to mother and stir
Add flour to mother and stir
Let rise 6-8 hours
Bake at 425 degrees till internal temp gets to 195-205 degrees
It took mine about 40 minutes

It turned out great. You can really taste the honey so if you prefer a less sweet bread you might want to reduce the amount of honey.




Reply author: GailMN
Replied on: Mar 08 2009 12:30:28 PM
Message:

Thank you Kathy - the recipe sounds great.

Gail


Farmgirl Sister #506
A Smile a Day . . .


Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Mar 08 2009 12:33:01 PM
Message:

Kathy, thank you so much for the recipe! I'm going to have to bake twice a week with all these great recipes to try! That sounds like it would be favorite of mine right off the bat!

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: Suzan
Replied on: Mar 08 2009 3:50:34 PM
Message:

Sam, The only thing about letting it rise overnight is that the longer you let it rise the more sour it will taste - if you like the sour taste that's not a problem. Glad to hear your bread turned out! Tomorrow morning I'm making cinnamon raisin bread but I have alot of starter going so I think the honey wheat oatmeal bread is on the agenda too!


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 08 2009 4:49:20 PM
Message:

Ok, slightly off topic here. My son wasn't as happy with the bread as I was. He admitted that it was not that the bread was bad, just that he had expected something closer to banana bread sweetness and texture. Once I reminded him that this was not quick bread he said he was going to try it toasted. Now I did some searching and found a banana bread recipe using the sourdough starter. What I am wondering is if you could substitute applesauce for bananas for an apple cinnamon loaf?

My other question is on crust. Now I like the extra crispy crunch, but don't know how some of my older relatives with dentures would fair with it. Was reading that if you put an egg wash on the bread that the crust wouldn't be quite as hard. Also saw a reference made to using white vinegar in a spray bottle (spritz once before baking and once part way through cooking) to have a slightly less tough crust. Does anyone know if this is true?

http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: Calicogirl
Replied on: Mar 08 2009 5:11:45 PM
Message:

Julie,

My husband made breakfast yesterday morning.. Your Sourdough Pancakes, they were wonderful! It did make a large batch so we flash-froze them for another time. Thanks for the recipe :)

~Sharon

By His Grace, For His Glory


Reply author: urban farm girl
Replied on: Mar 08 2009 5:16:40 PM
Message:

Kathy that recipe really sounds good....how long did it take for your loaf to rise?


Reply author: ParisKnight
Replied on: Mar 08 2009 6:20:54 PM
Message:

Melissa

I use the bake in a pot method and it sat for a little over 7 hours yesterday before I baked. I was out in the PM or might have baked sooner but it probably takes at least 6 hours to rise up close to the edge of my 2qt pot. I cover the pot with its lid and leave it sitting on top of my oven. A few hours into the rise I turn on the oven and crank the heat up for a half hour or so. Not exactly energy efficient but it warms up the pot and seems to give the rise a boost.


Reply author: urban farm girl
Replied on: Mar 08 2009 6:56:42 PM
Message:

Alright that sounds good....I believe I will try that tomorrow.....I'll let you know how it goes..thanks Kathy!!


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 08 2009 6:58:59 PM
Message:

Lisa Yes you can substitute applesauce. Use 1 cup applesauce for every 1cup of banana.

If you want a softer crust - rub the top with butter as soon as it comes out of the oven.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 08 2009 7:00:49 PM
Message:

Lisa Yes you can substitute applesauce. Use 1 cup applesauce for every 1cup of banana.

If you want a softer crust - rub the top with butter as soon as it comes out of the oven.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Ronna
Replied on: Mar 08 2009 8:14:00 PM
Message:

The nature of a sourdough bread is a thicker crisper crust. Yes, rubbing the top with butter when it is still hot from the oven will help soften it, but only to a certain extent. My MIL saved the wrappers from butter/margarine in the freezer and used them to grease pans and on bread out of the oven.


Reply author: Carrie M
Replied on: Mar 09 2009 10:34:45 AM
Message:

My sourdough is producing better and better loaves! Definately aging helps with the rise and the softness of the dough. I'm also completely converted over to my MJF organic white flour now and have found that to be absolutely heavenly!!! I can even add wheat flour in the recipes for loaves and still get nice soft bread!

Hang in there, those of you with "young" mothers!

Carrie m

PS- got some crumbled feta from my cheese making neighbor and put it in a couple of loaves (about 1/2 cup each) and it was lovely!

www.totallykadeshfarm.blogspot.com

Farmgirl Sisterhood #147

Tis better to weep at joy than to joy at weeping--Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 09 2009 10:42:38 AM
Message:

Thanks for all the replies. I'll play around and let you know how things turn out.

Today is day 9 for my "mother" and something sure kick started her overnight! Wow, got up this morning and found triple the number of bubbles and more of the distinctive sourdough smell than before. Going to try the extra feedings so I can share her with my best friend and do some baking this week.

http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 09 2009 2:51:59 PM
Message:

Sourdough Croissants (Make 12 - 16)

This recipe has a lot of short steps but is delicious and is worth it to try even if you only make them once!
In a mixing bowl combine

1/2 cup starter
2 tablespoons sugar
1/2 cup warm water
3/4 cup flour

Let stand three hours or overnight, until expanded to about 2 cups.



The key to flakey croissants is to create lots of layers of butter and dough. Unfortunatly this isn’t a recipe where you can cut back on the butter!
Slice 2 sticks of cold butter into 10 – 12 slices. Place side-by-side on a sheet of waxed or parchment paper, forming a square. Dust with 1 tablespoon flour. Cover with another sheet of waxed or parchment paper and roll or press the butter between the papers until the slices are combined into a single slab of butter about 9" x 9". Chill the butter about 1 hour (or overnight as well) in the refrigerator.

Mix into the starter to form a soft dough:

3 tablespoons sugar (If you prefer a more savory croissant you will want to reduce this)
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup cold milk
1 cup flour

Knead a few times on a well-floured surface to incorporate the rest of the flour, adding up to 1/4 cup more flour as necessary. The dough will be VERY light and fluffy feeling. Cover and chill about 1/2 hour in the
refrigerator.

Remove the dough from the fridge and quickly roll out into a
rectangle about 15" x 10" (remember to flour the surface). Cut the cold butter in half and place one slab of butter across the center one-third of the dough. Fold one end of the dough over the butter, and then place the other half-slab of butter on it. Then fold the last third of the dough over
the butter, forming a package of dough-butter-dough-butter-dough,
about 10" x 5". (SEE PICTURES BELOW) Pinch the edges together so that there is no butter showing.

Quickly roll out this package of dough and butter into a rectangle
about 10" x 15". Fold it again into thirds, forming a package about
10" x 5" and chill in the refrigerator at least an hour.

After the dough has chilled one hour, remove from the fridge, roll it out, fold it, roll it and fold it again as you did above. Chill the new 10x5” package for another hour. (I know it seems like a lot but they are SO good and just think of all the calories you are burning while you make these! Almost makes up for all the butter!)

Line to large cookie sheets with parchment paper and spray or lightly brush with vegetable oil.

Roll out the dough into a rectangle about 10" x 15". Cut the dough
into six 5" x 5" squares, then cut each square diagonally forming
twelve triangles, 5" x 5" x 7". Flatten each triangle to about 1/8 thickness and then roll the dough starting with the wide end working towards the point as you would a crescent roll. Turn the ends in towards each other to form a half moon shape and place onto the baking sheets.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Bake the croissants 20-30 minutes,
then turn off the oven and open the door. They will be golden brown and flakey when they are done. Let them sit in the warm oven an additional 5-10 minutes to ensure they have cooked all the way through.

Be sure to use the upper most baking racks or the butter will melt out of them too fast while they cook. You may also want to switch the position of the two trays half-way through the baking time.




























Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: mimilou
Replied on: Mar 09 2009 3:08:59 PM
Message:

Julie,
You are amazing! Thanks for the information on increasing my mother. We are enjoying this sourdough experience so much. I bought my friend a copy of the magazine to encourage her to try it! I can't wait to move on from the bread to the carrot cake and the pizza. It's difficult each week chossing what to make. Thank you for creating and sharing the recipes.


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 09 2009 3:29:45 PM
Message:

Thanks MaryLou! It is a good thing I teach cause teachers are always lurking around the lounge looking for free food! Everything is SO good but I would gain a ton of weight if I ate everything I have been baking! I have eaten like 4 of the croissants though! I'll just have to run an extra mile on the treadmill at the gym tomorrow.

And I have a loaf of pumpernickel bread rising right now! I'll post that after I bake it!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Quintessential Kate
Replied on: Mar 09 2009 4:55:10 PM
Message:

Don't know if this information is now moot......but here goes. I don't even remember who asked, but I put an egg wash on my last two loaves of Sourdough French and they had the most beautiful golden crust and they were soft...not crunchy and crumbly. I do love the crunchy crust but wanted to put sesame seeds on the loaves and needed the egg wash to make them stick. I was very happy with the results.

JULIE.......those croissants are BEAUTIFUL!!!! Can't wait to try them. Thanks for your dedication and experimentation.....and all the sage advice you give. And above all...your patience with us. I have sooooo enjoyed this fourm and look forward to many more recipes.

Ciao,
Kate

Heart of Texas
Chapter
AKA: Hot Farmgirl #234
http://quintessentialkate.blogspot.com

Today is my best day!


Reply author: MaryJane
Replied on: Mar 09 2009 6:43:07 PM
Message:

Hi farmgirls--brace yourselves, this is a tad long.

Now that you’ve seen what happens to an idea once it’s in the public domain, you can imagine the tremendous amount of R&D (research and development) that goes into a how-to book. You might think a book is just the words and the photos you see, but it’s so much more. It’s what goes on behind the scenes that makes a book a good book--some books better than others because of how much time went into the R&D part of it. I learned a good lesson with my first book when I graced its pages with an apron pattern that an employee handed me. She seemed so confident and I knew she was a good seamstress. Well, it had a major mistake and we’ve paid dearly by having to put a correction page into the first two printings of the book, not to mention the cringe factor--us cringing every time we get an email about it. So, now I run my patterns and recipes by three different people first. That takes a lot of time and money. As I begin work on my sourdough bread book, I make the recipes first and then I pass them on to others to make and give me feedback.

That said, my idea behind putting forth my “Bread the MaryJane Way” in my magazine first (before finalizing the idea into a book) was my way of launching the idea sooner rather than later because, well, I love to share what I’m passionate about! And I have to admit, I was also motivated by our current economy. I thought a concept so cheap, so simple, and so healthy couldn’t wait until I was completely DONE! (And I have to admit, my R&D efforts went almost entirely into coming up with easy measurements for you. I’ve baked sourdough exclusively for something like 30 years WITHOUT ever using a measuring cup--I just eyeball it.)

I also thought getting it onto this forum would in essence give me more than three testers! Your “feedback” has been invaluable as I continue to work on my bread book in my kitchen as well as in my head.

Here’s a glimpse into my world--a behind-the-scenes view:
More than 10 years ago, I bought a 3-story historic flour mill. It wasn’t one of my dreams to own a mill on the National Historic Register. But rather, it was one of those things that happen to you for a reason you’ll better understand at a later date. My dream at the time was to feed people organic food--falafel in particular. When my orders for falafel outgrew the volume I could produce on my hand grinder, I hooked up a lawn mower engine to my hand grinder and went my merry way. When my sales outgrew that approach, I ended up on the doorstep of a local third generation miller who took me under his wing. Joseph Barron not only let me use his large 100-year-old grinder for milling my garbanzo beans, he eventually sold me his historic mill in addition to hoping that my husband and I would continue on as flour millers. Believe me, we tried. We tried for several years. Hubby drove an old rusty 1961 Ford truck once a week to Joseph’s mill in Oakesdale, Washington (it’s an hour drive from our farm). I drove a 1965 Rambler station wagon. Once the back of my faux truck was full of flour for the drive home, the front wheels almost lifted off the ground! I would chug home late at night covered in flour dust. Not too slowly, because once I was pulled over by a police officer for going 35 through a small town with a posted 25 limit. When he saw my face covered in flour and found out what I was transporting, he let me off the hook. After all, we millers and farmers DO feed you.

We ground the very best organic grains in the world with Joseph teaching us all the tricks of the trade. But flour, even organic flour, is a tricky commodity. The price we’re used to paying per pound for flour as consumers has everything to do with massive volume, as in only a handful-of-mega-million-dollar-companies-left volume. (In Joseph’s day, most every county in the country had a local mill and resident miller.) We felt like Mike Mulligan (the kid’s book, Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel). We just couldn’t work fast enough. We couldn’t get past the color red on our books. Eventually, I came up with the idea to make our flour pay by creating value-added breads like my Garlic Fry Bread or my Focaccia Bread, and sure enough, that worked:

http://shopping.maryjanesfarm.org/s.nl/sc.2/category.13/.f#Breads

But selling flour didn’t. We just couldn’t get to that kind of volume with our equipment--and that, coupled with our collective “God-given-right-to-cheap-flour” mentality, (many people would comment, “Wow, the shipping costs are more than the flour”), we had to know when to stop…for the time being.
Joseph died in 2000 before he witnessed us turning off his big mill--we still use his smaller mill for garbanzo beans, corn, and a limited amount of wheat, etc. (Joe, I still have it in me to try flour again on your big mill, but with a bit more smarts this time.) To read more about this remarkable organic pioneer, go to:

http://www.maryjanesfarm.org/About/our-historic-flour-mill.asp

Four years ago, we poured a new concrete foundation at my farm for our someday on-site flour mill. It sits covered in snow today, but my desire to provide bakers with quality flour has been fired up again after reading about your problems with your starters. The white flour that I use for mine was a “find” that goes back to Joseph. His mill (one of the mills we have sitting in storage) ground whole wheat flour like none other, using a unique design that created a cult following for his signature whole wheat organic flour. Along the way, his bakers also wanted organic white flour. He struck a deal with a mill in Montana (one that is set up to take out the bran), and to this day, we’ve continued the tradition, trucking it here from Montana to use in our baking and bread mixes.

When I was getting ready to put my “Bread the MaryJane Way” concept into The Simply Bee Feb/March 2009 issue of my magazine, I quickly tried a bunch of different flours in my breads and then called the folks at King Arthur. I had used their flour for baking occasionally and knew their business was highly regarded. But first I asked my hubby if there was any chance he’d be willing to sell our flour again via mail-order, but he got that tired look and I knew his answer needed to be “no.” I even called around to see if anyone else was already bringing in the same flour in bulk that we do and then repackaging it for mail order. Same answer, no.

I sent my magazine off to the printer thinking I’d covered all my bases by recommending King Arthur organic flour. But once I started hearing your complaints about hooches, etc. I ordered a significant amount, as well as some I received from Bob’s Red Mill. My R&D then (after the fact) consisted of four different mothers, all of them started on the same day, four weeks ago: KA organic bread flour, KA all-purpose organic flour, Bob’s Red Mill organic unbleached white flour and my flour, organic unbleached white flour (the flour I use in my quick-prep mixes). Wow, was I in for a surprise. In fact, Rebekka Mae, called the difference “shocking” once she had access to our flour through my daughter. Both KA flours lumped up no matter how hard I tried to mix them into my mother with a spoon. Bob’s didn’t lump up as much as theirs did, but all three took forever to get going and hooch they did, big time (dark alcohol on the top). I suppose the lumps in the KA flour have to do with the addition of malted barley--something I don’t remember as an ingredient in KA flour years ago when I used to bake with it.

Well, darn it anyhow, my ability to help you find good flour that would make my idea a slam dunk had a bit of a hooch, I mean hitch. Like Prosserfarmgirl said, not all flours are created equal. So I offered our official SISTERS a deal last month that included free shipping on my flour. My husband was convinced I’d lost my mind when he showed me how much money we’d lost on that venture. But I slept better at night knowing some of you had either figured out how to find good flour on your own or at least bought some of mine.

We all know the way to a man’s heart is through hot buttered bread, so I kept feeding him my sourdough creations while saying things like, “There just has to be a way for me to sell my sisters my really super good, like-none-other, reliable, fresh organic flour, perfect for mothers.”

Here’s what he came up with. If we ship it ONLY through the postal service in either increments of 15 or 20 pounds, he can fit the three or four five-pound sacks into one of their large flat-rate packages. The dollar amount then on shipping is significantly cheaper than UPS. Anything less or more, like an order for 5, 10, or 25 pounds doesn’t make sense shipping-wise. And if you place an order for our flour along with some other items in our Web store, we’ll treat them as two separate orders. (For those of you who bought 25 pounds during my Sisterhood special, the UPS shipping completely negated the tiny margin we had on the flour. Oh well.) If you’re baking bread according to my methods, you’ll use up 15 pounds, no problem. Remember, the bread you make using my minutes-a-day method is still far cheaper than anything you can buy, both organic or non-organic.

Someday, I hope we’re milling enough organic whole-wheat flour again to have extra to sell along with our organic white flour. In the meantime, the perfect way to add whole-wheat flour to your breads is to bring in a supply of organic hard-red wheat berries and give them a quick crank on a hand grinder (www.grainmaker.com). Another source you might try for whole-wheat flour is www.bluebirdgrainfarms.com although I need to tell you I haven’t tried their flour, but I do like their website and mission statement.

I think the only way we can get the postal rate on shipping onto our website is to add it to the per pound price, otherwise our Web store software automatically charges UPS rates.

Today my crew put our flour up for sale on our website!!!! Let’s all give Nick, my husband, and Gabe, who manages our Web store, a big THANK YOU!

For those of you who’ve been frustrated, help is on the way. (More flour is on its way to you too, Julie-willowtreecreek). Here’s the link to buy my FLOUR, SPECIALTY SOURDOUGH:

http://shopping.maryjanesfarm.org/s.nl/it.A/id.1891/.f

Now back to my bread book, knowing you have access to the same tried-n-true flour that I use to keep my mother happy, bubbly, lump- and hooch-free.


MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~


Reply author: ruralfarmgirl
Replied on: Mar 09 2009 7:16:44 PM
Message:

WOW Julie your rolls looks awesome.... I tried your carrot cake and it was heavenly, thanks for the great recipes.

MaryJane~ Thank You.. for making the flour available......... more yummy bread to our table :).....

THANKS NICK AND GABE....!!!!!!

Rene~Prosser Farmgirl #185
http://farmchicksfarm.blogspot.com/http://renenaturallyspeaking.blogspot.com/



Circumstances made us FRIENDS; MaryJane's has made us SISTERS :)


Reply author: urban farm girl
Replied on: Mar 09 2009 7:31:07 PM
Message:

Julie those croissants look awesome as usual....you definitely have the knack! Well I feel good I finally had success today. I made the Honey Wheat Oatmeal Bread Kathy posted and I finally had luck ... my loaf finally rose....put it in the oven ....some one had mentioned putting in some boiling water in the oven...so I did and it turned out ....I believe I could have let it to rise a bit longer but it was getting late and I needed to get dinner on...so with the chicken soup I had the bread and it was big time good. YEAH!! I had made the other day the pancakes Julie posted and also the biscuits and they were big time good. I had changed my flour to Bob's Red Mill and it did seem to make a differnce or the weather or maybe both. I bet MJ's flour is realllll good. Well I'm a happy camper today....good recipe Kathy..thanks!!


Reply author: Tina Kay
Replied on: Mar 09 2009 7:59:55 PM
Message:

THis is sooo delicious and very easy to do!!!! I am so glad that my first magazine was Feb-Mar. Thank you, MaryJane.

Tina Kay

Now I get me up to work, I pray the Lord I may not shirk. If I should die before tonight, I pray the Lord my work's all right. Anon.


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 09 2009 8:18:44 PM
Message:

MaryJane - thanks so much for sharing your story! Your last three books have been amazing but when this bread book comes out I believe all of us will feel a special bond with it! And I am SO excited to know this flour will be available to all! Girls I cannot stress enough how amazing the flour it! I just finished baking a loaf of pumpernickel bread using MaryJanes flour and the rise, texture and crumb is AMAZING! Photos and a recipe will be coming tomorrow evening on that!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: sjs
Replied on: Mar 09 2009 9:41:06 PM
Message:

Hi everyone, I'm new and I posted this in elsewhere, but was told that I might get a better response if I put it here. Here goes!

I'm starting my sourdough "mother" today with organic unbleached white flour, but I'm trying to cut white/refined grains out of my diet so I probably won't continue with the white flour. Has anyone here has luck using other grains, like whole wheat, spelt, etc?

The instructions say that whole wheat is harder to work with - has anyone here had any success and would be willing to share your secrets/caveats? I'm excited to eat this bread, but I've got to stay away from the white stuff for health reasons...


Stephanie, Farmgirl Sister #513!

--------------------
Learning to live is learning to let go.

Visit my food blog! http://www.wasabimon.com - natural cooking to live for.


Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Mar 10 2009 05:31:24 AM
Message:

Wow! Julie...those croissants are beautiful and I bet they taste delicious too! They look time-consuming though but well worth it I'm sure. I did get in on the deal that Mary Jane offered with her flour last month. It looks great and I got 5-5lb bags and threw it in my freezer for safe-keeping because it gets humid down here fast! Now, I took a bag out this morning and noticed it says WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR not WHITE. Uh-oh....is this the "white" flour that you've been using Julie or did I get wheat flour by mistake? It states it is "Organic Unbleached Wheat Flour". I guess I'll call the farm later since I have to place an order for something else anyway but I need to find out since my original "organic white" is about to run out.
Thanks Mary Jane for all your help in this and for all of you who have added wisdom, advice and experience to this thread. It is well worth it to keep on "plowin' through" until we all get the bread we deserve!

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 10 2009 07:23:29 AM
Message:

Stephanie - I did not start a whole wheat starter but have added whole wheat flour when I get to the baking process. The reason wheat doesn't do as well in the starter has to do with the gluten content. That doesn't mean it wont work you may just need to spend more time developing it. If you are concerned about using white flour give the wheat a try and see if it works for you. Another member named Leezard had sucess using spelt flour.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 10 2009 07:25:15 AM
Message:

Sam - that would be a question for MaryJane or the farm. My all-purpose flour comes to me in a big box so I can't vouch for what is written on the bags.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: sjs
Replied on: Mar 10 2009 08:29:43 AM
Message:

Hrmm, so I'm getting in late on this thread and I'm still trying to get through the whole thing (only on page three now...). After reading MaryJane's post on page 63, I'm concerned about the barley additives. I bought some Whole Foods/365 organic unbleached white flour, and I just looked and it does indeed have barley in it. My mother does look good, though, bubbly and definitely smells like sourdough! It does lump when I mix in new flour and it's impossible to get them all out... is this going to be a problem?

Also, I'm searching for Leezard's posts on using spelt, but can't find it in this ginormous thread (did you know ginormous is a real word, in the dictionary and everything?).


Stephanie, Farmgirl Sister #513!

--------------------
Learning to live is learning to let go.

Visit my food blog! http://www.wasabimon.com - natural cooking to live for.


Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Mar 10 2009 08:46:20 AM
Message:

Stephanie, mine is lumpy when I first mix in the flour each day but my "Lizzie" seems to eat away and the lumps are gone the next time I add more flour and water so I don't think the lumps are a problem....I've been using my starter with no problem.
I think "ginormous" was just added this year wasn't it? They add new ones each year but some of them do make you wonder...I'm still not comfortable with "ain't" being in there.
Love your quote at the bottom....that is SO TRUE!!!! And the sooner we learn it the better!
Have a great day everyone! P.S. It is 71 here already and I just hung out 2 loads of clothes and they are whipping in the wind....IT"S SPRING!!!! Here in the Ozark's anyway!

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: mimilou
Replied on: Mar 10 2009 09:13:02 AM
Message:

I mix my flour and water in a separate bowl and then add this to my mother - eliminates most of the lumps. I am using Arrowhead Mills Organic Unbleached flour and so far it's been working great - lots of lovely bubbles etc.


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 10 2009 09:21:17 AM
Message:

Stephanie - Leezards post was actually in another topic. Not this one.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Deni
Replied on: Mar 10 2009 09:28:50 AM
Message:

Hi Stephanie. I actually began with a whole wheat starter. It was okay, just, but improved when I started adding unbleached. I think if it says "unbleached" you have a white flour. Wheat is what its made of. Anyway, my current starter is a combination. To my two-week old whole wheat starter (which was pretty hoochy) I began adding unbleached. Then I started adding whole wheat every other day. This is the best for my Mom. She likes the added boost of the whole grain and the smooth texture of the unbleached. On baking day I only use whole wheat because I like rich, dense bread. And like you, I've cut everything "white" out of my diet, mostly because it means "processing" -- and we never really know what THAT means!

After a long dry winter we've started having rain and humidity here in Missouri. I've begun adjusting my water content depending on the humidity and how Mom is acting. So far so good! I'm not having lump issues - maybe just a difference in flour.

BTW - the Olive Oil Rosemary bread I made last Saturday is the best yet. I'm having to hide it from myself!



sunshinedreamkitchen.blogspot.com


Reply author: Gabe
Replied on: Mar 10 2009 10:31:21 AM
Message:

Sandra:

We decided to call it like it is — "wheat" flour that is unbleached (as opposed to "rye" flour, or "barley" flour, or "spelt" flour).
If it were whole wheat, the label would say "whole" wheat.
So, if you wanted non-whole wheat, rest assured you received the correct variety.

Gabe


Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Mar 10 2009 1:10:42 PM
Message:

Thanks Gabe! It looked fine to me but I remembered Mary Jane specifying white as opposed to wheat so I understand now! Thank you for clarifying for me! YEP! Got just what I asked for and more! Tell Mary Jane her chocolates are DIVINE and I appreciated it! I'll be ordering more shortly.

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 10 2009 3:31:35 PM
Message:

sjs, in my humble opinion...i'd say start "mother" out according to the directions given and give it a few weeks to get brewing really well...once you have consistently acceptable results then wean mother onto the flour of choice...say by splitting the "feedings" 50/50 for the first week...if the results are still good...then try the switch over to the flour of your choosing

http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 10 2009 3:34:14 PM
Message:

p.s. to sjs...just because your mother isn't the grain of your choice doesn't mean the entire recipe must be...when you add in any additional flour to the recipes you try then use what you want and see how your results come out...and please by all means share with us so we can all experience it with you! Good luck, and hope you enjoy the addiction as much as we all do.

http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 10 2009 3:43:24 PM
Message:

after reading some of the posts i guess that i consider myself fortunate in that there has never been a lumping problem in my mother...no hooch issues so far...and the KA is working for me. Currently working with a combo of the Bread flour and the All Purpose. All that I can say is this is a definite case of "your results may vary"! So many factors that can't be controlled in the environoment.

http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 10 2009 6:16:22 PM
Message:

Thanks for clarifying Gabe!

Girls it is 8:15 and I just got home so I'm not gonna post the pumpernickel till tomorrow. It is gorgeous and delicious though!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: candela59
Replied on: Mar 12 2009 08:46:06 AM
Message:

Hello to everyone. I just registered and wanted to introduce myself. I just received my first issue of Mary Jane's magazine and was thrilled to see the sourdough recipe. I've been experimenting with the no knead bread recipes from Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day, but I'm just crazy about sourdough. I also like the no yeast aspect and that it is organic. I spent at least an hour yesterday reading through the posts!

I live in a very small town on the Western Slope of Colorado and have spent the morning looking for a stoneware bowl and cast-iron pot. Found the pot on amazon.com but shipping is ridiculous. I'm going to check out the thrift stores and order my flour from KA today.

Anyway, this city girl (raised in San Diego), married a country boy and have been completely converted!! I'm really excited about joining this group. Can't wait to chat!!

Peggy

www.thewanderlustgirl.blogspot.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 12 2009 09:19:01 AM
Message:

Welcome Peggy! We are glad you are here and look forward to your contributions.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Tina Kay
Replied on: Mar 12 2009 10:17:44 AM
Message:

Hello I am not exactly new here. But I have been visiting more lately.
I am on my third week with my mother and I found mold on the side of my bowl yesterday. It was not in the mother. I cleaned off the side and transferred the mother to another bowl. But I got to thinking I should just start over.? (that is my question :)
I am using Bob's Red Mill Organic and purified water. I was using a ceramic bowl, but switch it to a pyrex one (from the 70's). I had it sitting on the counter by my oven. I am moving it somewhere else. I am thinking it just got to warm. I keep my house at 65 during the day and less at night. It usually never gets warmer than 70 in here. I suppose it is just a guessing game on why I got the mold.
On the bright side. My second batch of bread turned out just wonderful. Nice crackly crust and soft, moist inside. Yummy!!!! Don't ask me about the first. I really am a dunce in the kitchen. lol Sometimes I wonder why I bother.

Have a wonderful day!
Tina Kay


Now I get me up to work, I pray the Lord I may not shirk. If I should die before tonight, I pray the Lord my work's all right. Anon.


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 12 2009 10:49:09 AM
Message:

mold is a tough issue and everyone has a different opinion about it and about what is too much mold or "just a little so it wont hurt". I would suggest you do what you feel is right for you on that issue.

PERSONALLY - I wouldn't toss it. I reccommend changing the bowl every few weeks. You also want to wash your towel at least once a week.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: sjs
Replied on: Mar 12 2009 10:58:02 AM
Message:

My mom just hooched, too. Sad panda.

--------------------
Learning to live is learning to let go.

Visit my food blog! http://www.wasabimon.com - natural cooking to live for.


Reply author: amberjsquirrel
Replied on: Mar 12 2009 11:13:53 AM
Message:

Hello Everyone and welcome to Peggy!
I was wondering if a wet dishtowel is necessary if a crust doesn't form on the mother? My mother is 3 weeks old and started producing hooch just this week. I use distilled water and KA Flour, fed once a day with a double dose for double baking. I was using a dry dishcloth until a couple days ago and started the wet dishcloth when I found my first crust, that I was able to stir back in. Could extra hooch be connected to the new wet dishcloth?
Another question, if I bake a double batch in a 2 qt cast iron pot, do I lower the heat and bake longer, or keep it at the same heat, no matter what the size?

Wonderful croissant pictures! I love complicated beautiful things! Especially those with butter inside. :)

Amber

"One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries." --A.A. Milne


Reply author: Tina Kay
Replied on: Mar 12 2009 11:51:27 AM
Message:

Thanks for the insight. I think I will keep it since it was on the Hooch? or the gunk on the side. lol I need to learn the "mother" language.

Tina Kay


Now I get me up to work, I pray the Lord I may not shirk. If I should die before tonight, I pray the Lord my work's all right. Anon.


Reply author: sjs
Replied on: Mar 12 2009 1:00:22 PM
Message:

Hrmm, my mother hooched once I dampened the dish towel too.

--------------------
Learning to live is learning to let go.

Visit my food blog! http://www.wasabimon.com - natural cooking to live for.


Reply author: Deni
Replied on: Mar 12 2009 1:21:44 PM
Message:

Stephanie - don't be sad! Hooch is not a bad thing - just a thing. A few pages back the girls told me it is natural - an alcohol that the mixture makes. It can be stirred in or poured off. I've been stirring in and maybe adding a little less water. It happens. Then it goes away. Then it happens again. I'm sure there's some reason but I don't know it. I usually encounter it mid-week but by baking day its a-okay!
Hope this helps! Deni



sunshinedreamkitchen.blogspot.com


Reply author: sjs
Replied on: Mar 12 2009 2:19:19 PM
Message:

Thanks Deni. :) I haven't made it through the whole thread yet.

Maybe it has something to do with the temperature that day?

--------------------
Learning to live is learning to let go.

Visit my food blog! http://www.wasabimon.com - natural cooking to live for.


Reply author: amberjsquirrel
Replied on: Mar 12 2009 5:33:58 PM
Message:

I was thinking it might be due to weather too! When it got warm, it was very happy. I could almost hear mother gurgling. :)
Then it turned cold and a lot of hooch was produced.
Thanks Deni!
Amber

"One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries." --A.A. Milne


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 12 2009 6:26:29 PM
Message:

Hooch (the thin layer of liquid that forms on top) is not a bad thing necessarily. Some flours will produce it more than others. If you are getting a lot of hooch it is an indication that your starter is getting too hungry between feedings. It can be reduced or eliminated by doubling feedings for a few days. At the end of the week you can use your extra starter in another recipe or pass it off to a friend!

The wet towel is up to you. I only wet mine every few days but my house is fairly humid and I was not getting a crust on top.

Amber - I would lower the temp by 25 degrees and check with a thermometer throughout the baking. You will need to increase the baking time as well.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 12 2009 6:30:57 PM
Message:

OKAY - As promised! Sorry it is late but Life Happens!

Sourdough Pumpernickel Bread

Put this together the night before you want to bake your bread.

1 1/3 cups sourdough starter
1 cup black coffee (or water if you don't have any coffee around)
2 Tbs. Crushed Caraway Seeds (Optional – see note* below)
2 cups pumpernickel (or rye) flour
1/2 cup chopped onion

*Grind Caraway seeds using a mortar and pestle. Pour boiling coffee over the seeds. Allow mixture to cool to room temperature before adding to starter.

The next day add:

2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 teaspoons salt
1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa (added for the dark color)
1/4 cup dark, unsulphured molasses
about 4 cups of Unbleached All-Purpose Flour (Add 1 cup at a time)

Stir the oil, salt, cocoa and molasses into the sponge. Stir in the flour one cup at a time until you have a dough that you can knead. Turn it out onto a lightly floured surface and knead, adding only enough more flour to keep it from being actually sticky (when the dough actually sticks to your hands). When you knead a dough that contains rye flour, it will never completely lose its tacky feel. This dough does not need to be kneaded long. Only long enough to incorporate the flour.

You will have enough dough to make one large loaf or two smaller loaves. Line a bread pan with parchment paper and add the dough. Cover loosely with a damp towel and allow the dough to rise about 2 hours at a room temperature of 65 to 75. If the room is cooler you may need to double the rise time.

When the dough is just short of double in size you can bake in a preheated oven at 350 for about an hour or until internal temperature reaches about 195. If you are baking smaller loaves, begin checking the temperature at 30 minutes.

Remove to a cooling rack, slice and enjoy.

NOTE - I did NOT add caraway or cocoa to the bread pictured below but followed the exact recipe above for everything else. Bread made WITH cocoa will be darker in color.








Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 12 2009 6:36:25 PM
Message:

Here is an updated index

MaryJane’s Bread Article ..........................................pg. 1

Baked French Toast with Apples and Nuts................pg. 12

Pancakes.....................................................................pg. 13

Sanfrancisco Style Bread (Ronna) ............................pg. 13

Old Fashioned Biscuits (celticheart) .........................pg. 17

Pancakes (celticheart) ...............................................pg. 17

Croutons....................................................................pg. 18

Waffles.....................................................................pg. 19

Buttermilk Biscuits ..................................................pg. 27

Whole Wheat Biscuits .............................................pg. 27

Basic Biscuits...........................................................pg. 27

Pizza Crust ..............................................................pg. 32

Bagels......................................................................pg. 43

English Muffins (Ronna).........................................pg. 45

Carrot Cake ............................................................ pg. 47

Bread Machine White Bread w/ added yeast..........pg. 49

Pecan/Date Bread....................................................pg. 51

Dog Treats..............................................................pg 53

Banana Cake (pearlgirl).........................................pg 54

Honey Wheat Oatmeal Bread (parisknight)....................pg 62

Croissants..................................................pg. 63

Pumpernickel Bread..........................................pg. 65


Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: urban farm girl
Replied on: Mar 13 2009 02:31:25 AM
Message:

Man oh man Julie that's a big WOW....I sure want to try that for my cornbeef and cabbbage. Thanks Julie!!!


Reply author: Quintessential Kate
Replied on: Mar 13 2009 05:53:08 AM
Message:

That's a BEAUTY Julie!! You come up with the BEST recipes. My Jilly Mack and Trinket (tiny TOY schnauzers) thank you for the biscuits. They have some favorite store bought "cookies".......but now they turn their wet little noses up at them. They KNOW I have a stash of the "yummy ones from Aunt Julie".......LOL
Thank you for all your hard work in keeping us going with this breadmaking! It truly is an art, isn't it???!!!
Ciao, Kate

Heart of Texas
Chapter
AKA: Hot Farmgirl #234
http://quintessentialkate.blogspot.com

Today is my best day!


Reply author: chessie
Replied on: Mar 13 2009 07:48:50 AM
Message:

Three Cheers for willowtreecreek-Julie!

www.edgehillherbfarm.com "where the name is bigger than the farm, but no one seems to mind"
blog http://edgehillherbfarmer.spaces.live.com/default.aspx?wa=wsignin1.0
happy farmgirl #89


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 13 2009 08:02:23 AM
Message:

aww...thanks guys! I am having fun! If anyone has any suggestions of a recipe you would like to see please let me know!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: ParisKnight
Replied on: Mar 13 2009 1:19:02 PM
Message:

Melissa - glad the bread turned out for you!

I'm a little late to the discussion about lumpy flour/starter. I use KA organic all purpose flour and haven't had a problem with lumps. I'm glad the KA flour is working for me because it is from a neighboring state and readily available here in Massachusetts. Of course, it is a little more expensive then their regular flour but I don't think it is as expensive here as some of you farmgirls out west and down south are finding it.

There did seem to be more hooch this week. It had a pretty distinct alcohol odor earlier in the week but that has lessened and today it was more yeasty smelling. Can't wait to bake tomorrow! I think I will try MaryJanes cinnamon raison bread.


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 13 2009 6:04:15 PM
Message:

Kathy I worked with the KA All Purpose and was not dissapointed in it. I think it is a viable alternative to MaryJanes flour if you cant purchase that. I grew up in Vermont about 10 miles from King Arthur Flour!

(I wouldn't reccommend the Bread flour though. I had a lot of trouble with it!)

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Jennie From Maine
Replied on: Mar 14 2009 06:00:06 AM
Message:

I'm making my first loaf today...can't wait to try a nice thick piece with lots of homemade butter!


Reply author: mimilou
Replied on: Mar 14 2009 07:40:23 AM
Message:

Today I am making the banana cake - tasted and it's delicious also made the carrot cake and I'm making the multi-grain bread. I am using the arrowhead mills organic unbleached white - so far it's working great and it's about 5.99 for a 5lb bag, much cheaper than the KA. My mother is approx. 1 month old and is bubbly, happy and producing wonderful breads/cakes. It's so much fun each week deciding what to make and then opening the oven to this delicious smelling/tasting bread. Thanks everyone for the recipes and tips.


Reply author: candela59
Replied on: Mar 14 2009 08:04:02 AM
Message:



quote:
Originally posted by willowtreecreek

Here is a link to a cast iron bread pan for 19.99. The picture is near the top of the page. You have to scroll down to order. I know several of you were looking for one of these.

http://www.chuckwagonsupply.com/catpage7.html#cabin

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com



Julie I just found your link for the cast iron bread pan. Thanks for the info! I've been using a ceramic casserole but would really like to try the cast iron! Thanks again! Peggy


www.thewanderlustgirl.blogspot.com


Reply author: GailMN
Replied on: Mar 14 2009 08:28:00 AM
Message:

Baking Day!! I am making the Banana Cake and Sourdough Chocolate Chip Cookies - my mom found the recipe in my Grandma's recipe book - I will try it and post if they turn out - LOL. Also found a recipe for a plain sourdough drop cookie, but thought I could make a thumbprint out of it and use some of my homemade jams - not sure I will be as successful as Julie, but am going to give it a try.

Gail


Farmgirl Sister #506
A Smile a Day . . .


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 14 2009 1:44:22 PM
Message:

Of course you will be successful! I'm no super hero! Just your average everyday kinda girl! The cookies sound great! I would ove for you to post a recipe! YUM!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 14 2009 5:53:41 PM
Message:

I haven't had any problems with hooch, lumps or mold. Use the KA flour, bottled water and the damp cloth. Once a week I faithfully wash the bowl and the towel. It is still relatively cool here in northern New York though. Might consider increasing the washings to twice a week in the warmer weather as a precaution. Mother is fed faithfully two to three times a day because there has been so much baking that I've wanted to do and passed on 2 cups to a friend yesterday so she could begin. She is sends off a really great scent and is all happy bubbles. Now that she is established, I tend to bake whenever the mood strikes me rather than just by the schedule. As a precaution I am thinking about taking a couple cups of mother and put it into cold storage standby in the refrigerator for back up. I saw how to do this on another site. Now that I have a happy starter, can't imagine life without it (as most of you can understand by now).

I believe in the magazine that MJ talked about covering mother with a plate on the top of the bowl (loaned my copy to my friend so I can't double check right now). Now that might help with the crust that some are getting on the top, but lessen the troubles of the damp cloth method if it is too humid in your area? Now if your bowl is deep enough there ought to be enough "head space" over mother to allow her to breathe. You'd be taking the plate off and on for feedings so, new air would be getting into the bowl too.

Made an applesauce cinnamon quick bread with it earlier in the week and that was terrific. Then yesterday I made a chocolate cake with it. The cake turned out amazing but sadly I did forget to take photos of it! Will try to remember to add the recipe this week to our growing list. The added sourdough seems to make a really nice "big" cake that wasn't heavy tasting. Next I want to get back to the MJ style bread and maybe some pizza dough.

Another warm weather storage question that I want to ask the group as we worry a little about food preparation safety. Once we start getting those hot summer days I wonder if it would work to put the starter bowl into your oven (when the oven is off and has been off a while of course) to insulate it a bit during the hotest part of the day? Now here is my logic...the oven is insulated to keep the heat in for baking, so why wouldn't it be a little cooler inside there on those "dog days" of summer if you keep the door closed and the light off?

http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: City_Chick
Replied on: Mar 14 2009 7:35:51 PM
Message:

Hey girls~
I started "Sally" my sourdough starter today. It has been on my to do list since I got the issue but I just kept putting off because this is like my 5th attempt at making a sourdough starter. I know the recipe says to use purified water. At the store I only saw distilled. Are they the same? Will it work in my starter or do you think I am already off to a bad start?
Hugs~

Christina
Farmgirl Sister #195
City Chick & Friends Chapter Mama
http://justacitychick.blogspot.com/


Reply author: GailMN
Replied on: Mar 14 2009 8:13:19 PM
Message:

Christina - I use distilled, I am in week 4 and no problems. Good Luck with "Sally", this time will be the charm.

Gail


Farmgirl Sister #506
A Smile a Day . . .


Reply author: gramax18
Replied on: Mar 14 2009 9:11:00 PM
Message:

I have a question. I read some time ago that you can dry some of the mother to save for later. I was wondering how much of the dry mother you would mix with the distilled water to get it started again? My daughter is coming from FL. next week and I would like to send some home with her.

Today I made Julie's pumpernickle bread and it is really good.Also gave some of mother to a friend.

Thanks again for all of the fun!

Elinor


Reply author: amberjsquirrel
Replied on: Mar 15 2009 07:49:37 AM
Message:

Thanks Lisa--I forgot about the plate on top! I guess it wouldn't hurt to go back and read the original article once in awhile. Ha ha. After reading the 66 pages here, I have forgotten some of the bits in the article.

I know what you mean about the sourdough starter changing your life! I haven't had success with baking the bread YET, but I have had a lot of fun adding it to other things with the other recipes.

Question: Is there a general rule of thumb when adding starter to a recipe? I would like to experiment with my recipes.

Speaking of experimenting, I just started reading a very good book called "The Improvisational Cook" by Sally Schneider. I recommend it. In the spirit of the book, this morning when I made the sourdough pancakes, I said "why not?" and poured the whole rectangular griddle full of batter leftover from our breakfast. After it cooked on one side, I flipped it over and cooked other side. Now I am going to roll it up with whipped cream and strawberries and slice it. My batter was very thin, so the pancakes were more like thickish crepes, but when it had the sides of the griddle to hold it up, it puffed up more. Very delish!

This is my first-ever non-recipe thing to do in the kitchen and I think I did it because of all the inspiration I get from you girls. Thanks!

I hope everyone had a delicious breakfast today, too!
Amber

"One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries." --A.A. Milne


Reply author: GailMN
Replied on: Mar 15 2009 08:36:33 AM
Message:

Happy Sunday Morning - it is a beautiful day in Minnesota. May get to 60 degrees today. Last night I made a batch of Sourdough Chocolate Chip Cookies. The cookies are more cake like and soft, we like them and they are oh so easy. Here is a picture and recipe.

My mom found the recipe in my grandmother's cookbook (Mom knew I had become addicted to sourdough, so she is feeding my addiction with recipes LOL)

Grandma M's Sourdough Chocolate Chip Cookies
1/2 cup butter
1/2 cup shortening
1 cup brown sugar
3/4 cup white sugar
2 eggs
2 cups starter
2 teaspoons vanilla
6 cups flour
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
chocolate chips
nuts (optional)

Combine sugar, butter, shortening, add eggs, starter and vanilla. In another bowl mix flour, baking powder, soda and salt. Add dry ingredients to wet mixture, mix well. Add chocolate chips. Mix well - let rest for 15 minutes. Place on greased cookie sheet. Bake at 375 degrees for 10 - 12 minutes. Makes approximately 8 dozen.

HERE IS WHAT I DID: I used my big stand mixer and made 1/2 a recipe, I used all butter instead of shortening, and next time I may cut back on white sugar - wanted to see how they turned out. I covered my cookie sheet with parchment and sprayed the parchment with cooking spray. I used a teaspoon and dropped onto cookie sheet, then dipped the back of a teaspoon into flour and flattened the mound of cookie dough. I baked for 10 minutes, this gave the cookie a nice warm bottom and cake like soft cookie. We like them.

Thank you for the encouragement Julie, I am becoming a very "daring" baker - I usually stick to things tried and true. My husband is loving the experiments. Next week pumpernickel bread!



I also found a plain sourdough cookie recipe that I am going to try midweek - I will post my results - I needed to find cookie recipes, I have several grandchildren that are always looking for cookies.

I also made the banana cake yesterday - very good! This morning I took some pancakes out of the freezer that I had made last week - warmed them for a few seconds and they were very good. Next week I think I will make another batch to freeze. When I froze them, I waited until the pancake had cooled, then put them between layers of parchment, then slid into a heavy duty freezer bag. I will be able to use the parchment and freezer bag over and over. Someone said in an earlier post that this is an addiction - but what a good addiction. Oh for the love of sourdough!

Gail


Farmgirl Sister #506
A Smile a Day . . .


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 15 2009 09:19:23 AM
Message:

"Any bread recipe (that does not call for quick-rise yeast) can be altered to use a sourdough starter — just substitute the yeast/water/sugar mixture with a cup of sourdough starter."

That is what I found in doing some reading.

As for drying out the starter I did find this link http://www.breadtopia.com/drying-sourdough-starter-for-long-term-storage/ if anyone wants to check that out.

As for cookies there actually are a ton of recipes on the internet. If you just do a search with the words cookies and sourdough there were a lot of results. I did that one day last week and started to copy recipies. Then I figure I can try a few and tweak them as needed. The search comes back pretty well with using sourdough and whatever it is you want to bake (bread, cookies, rolls, cakes, etc.) so the sky is the limit I guess. Still want to go over to the public library and browse their selection of books for recipes one afternoon when I get a chance too.

http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 15 2009 09:34:00 AM
Message:

Oh and I was just looking over my notes from the reading I've done and someone suggested watching yard sales, online auctions, used book stores and flea markets for cookbooks from the late 1960's and early 1970's because a lot of them are loaded with great sourdough recipes from the "back to the earth" period. Many of the books were locally produced or are now out of print.



http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 15 2009 11:02:18 AM
Message:

Lisa I think you meant to say substitute for yeast/water/flour.

The actual measurement I have used in the recipes I have altered so far is

1 cup starter = 1 Tbs. Yeast, 1/2 C. Water and 3/4 cup Flour


To REACTIVATE a dried starter:

Place 1 to 2 teaspoons of dried starter into a bowl.
Add 1/4 cup of water amd stir to help dissolve the chunks of starter.
Add 1/3 cup of flour and stir.
Cover bowl with a towel and let sit at room temperature about 12 hours.
Remove towel and stir well. Recover and let sit another 12 hours.
Begin feeding 1/3 cup of flour and 1/4 cup of water as recommended by MaryJanes Recipe.
The starter should be ready to use in any recipe in about 36 to 48 hours.



Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 15 2009 11:05:08 AM
Message:

Gail - Those cookies look fabulous! I really wish I had some chocolate chips!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 15 2009 11:11:36 AM
Message:

I have some Sourdough Brownies in the oven right now and will post the recipe later today!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Ronna
Replied on: Mar 15 2009 1:43:04 PM
Message:

After starter is spread thinly on a sheet of parchment, waxed paper or silcone, allow it to dry thoroughly. In NV, it's fast, in the humid south may take several days. You can also just leave the remainder when it's transferred to a new jar. As it dries, it will flake off to the bottom. Then whirl it in a blender or food processor to make it more like a powder. Can put it in a heavy zipper bag and crush with a mallet or rolling pin also. A fine powder will mix easily with warm water when you're ready to bring it back to life. I use less water to begin, about the same amount as the dried starter. Whatever works for the person doing it is fine.


Reply author: Ronna
Replied on: Mar 15 2009 1:50:34 PM
Message:

Any recipe that would benefit from the addition of sourdough flavor can be used. Yeast ones as well as baking powder. Add about a cup of starter at the end of mixing. As long as the consistency of what you are making is about the same as the starter, it should be fine. I keep my starter about like pancake batter, some like it thinner or thicker.
Unlike baking a cake, precise measurements in bread baking are not so critical. Make it enjoyable, not a job and you'll bake more often.


Reply author: Sewsmartie
Replied on: Mar 15 2009 3:02:35 PM
Message:

I learned a lot today everyone! Thanks for the index and the tips as well as a few new recipes.

I did not bake bread last week, but my "mother" is smelling ever so sour, a good sign. I did not feed her the last few days. Here's the question??? If I did not take 2 cups from her last week and neglected her for two days this week, should I still take just the 2 cups from her and continue as before each day? This means I will have just a bit more in the "mother". Does it make a difference??

You may recall that my earlier attempts (twice) have been unsucessful. I am hoping it may work better this time round. Also have any of you used your bread machine while baking from the "mother"?

A real city girl married to an old farm boy.
Martie

Sewsmartie


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 15 2009 3:13:10 PM
Message:

I have missed a feeding or two (like when I had the flu!) and it didn't seem to have any negative effect. I would just take out what you need and continue on as usual.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 15 2009 3:14:52 PM
Message:

Sourdough Cake-Like Brownies


1 cup melted butter
1 cup cocoa powder
1 cup sourdough starter
1 tbsp vanilla
4 eggs, slightly beaten
2 cups sugar
¾ cup flour
1 tsp salt
½ cup chopped nuts
In a large bowl, combine the melted butter and cocoa, stir together well. Add sourdough starter, vanilla, eggs, sugar, flour, salt, and nuts. Stir between each ingredient addition to combine all ingredients well. Pour into a greased cake pan and bake at 400 degrees for 30 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean.




















Served with a bit of PeanutButter Ice Cream! YUM!
Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: wannab
Replied on: Mar 15 2009 5:34:35 PM
Message:

Yum! Now that looks tasty. I attempted the 'Mother' and it failed. I have since (today) made another sourdough starter using yeast. I have had no luck finding the organic flour. But now I see a link or two here so now I am off to purchase flour via the internet. Thanks for the info.

"If you need help ask God, if you don't Thank God."


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 15 2009 7:42:29 PM
Message:

wannab, keep trying...don't feel bad if you had to use another type of recipe to get a starter going! We are all pretty laid back here (unlike some groups that I've been in where if you aren't a "purist" they cut you down).

Julie...you bake the most beautiful things and then take the best pictures of them too!

http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 15 2009 7:49:04 PM
Message:

Sideways Sourdough Fruit Cake from The Carefree Gourmet - by Joyce McCombs


A lot of people run away screaming when fruit cake appears on the table - maybe you can call it Sideways Cake instead. I tried to find out if there was a substitute for the brandy, but the only thing I came up with was sherry or hard cider. The alcohol might not be to your liking, but it's traditional in most fuitcakes and does help preserve the cake for a long time. Remember you have to start soaking the dried fruit the night before you bake.

1 1/2 cups dark raisins
1 1/2 cups golden raisins
3 cups assorted dried fruit
(try cranberries, dates, apricots, prunes, cherries)
1 cup brandy, heated
1 cup sugar
1 cup brown sugar, packed
2/3 cup shortening
1 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon
1 teaspoon nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon allspice
2 eggs, well beaten
1 cup sourdough starter
1 cup sliced almonds
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
2 teaspoons salt

Line two 9 x 5 x 3-inch loaf pans with a double thickness of wax paper, then grease the paper well.

Rinse, drain and coarsely chop all the dried fruit and place in large heat proof bowl and mix in hot cider (or brandy). Cover bowl tightly with plastic wrap and let stand overnight.

The next day, cream the sugars, shortening and spices together until fluffy. Beat in eggs. Stir in sourdough sponge. Combine with fruit mixture and almonds.

Sift flour, baking soda and salt together into batter and mix thoroughly. Turn into prepared loaf pans. Bake at 275 for 2 1/2 hours or until loaves test done, turning pans twice.

Cool loaves completely on wire racks before removing paper. Spoon 2 to 3 additional tablespoons of brandy over each cooled loaf before storing. Wrap in foil and refrigerate before slicing.


http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 15 2009 7:50:08 PM
Message:

Sourdough Gingerbread with Lemon Sauce from The Carefree Gourmet - by Joyce McCombs

1/4 cup butter
1/2 cup sugar
1 egg, beaten
1/2 cup molasses
1 cup sourdough starter
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon ginger
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1 cup flour
1/2 cup milk

Preheat oven to 350 and grease and flour a 9 inch square baking pan. Cream together butter and sugar; add egg and mix well. Add molasses, sourdough starter, cinnamon, ginger, ground cloves, nutmeg, salt, baking soda and baking powder. Mix. Add flour and milk and beat well. Bake for 45 to 55 minutes until cake tests done. Try it with this tang sauce:

Lemon Sauce

1/2 cup granulated sugar
1 tablespoon cornstarch
1 cup water
1 tablespoon butter
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 1/2 teaspoons grated lemon peel

Mix sugar and cornstarch. Gradually stir in 1 cup water. Cool over medium heat, stirring constantly until mixture become thick. Remove from heat and stir in butter, lemon juice and peel. Serve hot over Sourdough Gingerbread.


http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 15 2009 7:51:15 PM
Message:

Sourdough Bran Bread from The Carefree Gourmet - by Joyce McCombs

1 cup sourdough starter
4 tablespoons molasses
1 package dry yeast
3/4 cup lukewarm water
3/4 cup powdered milk
1 egg, beaten
3 tablespoons butter
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1 1/2 cups whole bran cereal
2 cups whole wheat flour
1 to 2 cups all-purpose flour

Place starter in a large mixing bowl. Add powdered milk, egg, butter and salt. Add cereal and whole wheat flour. Mix well by hand. Add flour until dough cleans the side of the bowl. Turn out onto a lightly floured surface and knead for 2 minutes. Place in a greased bowl, turning once. Cover with a cloth. Set in warm place for 1 hour.

Punch down. Shape into loaf and place into greased loaf pan. Cover with cloth and let rise in warm place, free from draft, for 1 hour. Bake at 375 degrees for 30 to 40 minutes.


http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 15 2009 7:52:15 PM
Message:

Sourdough Applesauce Cake from The Carefree Gourmet - by Joyce McCombs

Ingredients:
1 cup Sourdough starter
1 cup flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon cloves
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup butter
1/4 cup dry skim milk
1 cup applesauce
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon allspice
2 teaspoons soda
1 egg, beaten

Preheat oven to 350 and grease and lightly flour an 8 inch square cake pan. Combine starter, milk, flour, and applesauce, and let stand in a covered bowl in a warm place. Cream the sugars and butter together until light. Add the beaten egg and mix well. Add spices. Add a half cup of raisins or chopped nuts, if desired, or a mixture of the two. Beat until well mixed and no lumps remain. Bake at 350 for 35 to 45 minutes. Test for doneness with a knife when half an hour is up. Allow to cool completely before slicing.


http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 15 2009 8:05:20 PM
Message:

Sourdough Chiffon Cake

1 1/3 c All-purpose flour

3/4 c Sugar

1 1/2 ts Baking powder, double-acting

1/2 ts Salt

1/4 c Vegetable oil

1/4 c Water, cold

4 Egg yolks

1/2 c Sourdough starter

1/2 ts Vanilla

1 tb Fresh lemon juice

1/4 ts Cream of tartar

4 Egg whites


Mix and sift the first four ingredients. Make a well and add the oil, water, egg yolks, sourdough starter, vanilla and lemon juice. Beat until smooth. Now add the cream of tarter to the egg whites. beat the whites until well blended. Be slure to fold very gently. Turn into an ungreased 9-inch tube pan. Bake for 1 hour in a 325F oven. Cake should spring back when touched with finger. Immediately turn pan upside down placing tube over neck of bottle. Let hang to cool. Loosen with spatula to remove from pan. From Pat`s Sourdough and Favorite Recipes ISBN# 0-9625098-1-7



http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 15 2009 8:08:21 PM
Message:

Sourdough Peanut Butter Cookies

1 cup sourdough starter
1 cup peanut butter
1 cup butter
1 cup brown sugar
2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 eggs
1/2 teaspoon saltMix peanut butter, butter, brown sugar and flour. Add butter and remaining ingredients; form into small balls and press down with fork. Bake at 350 degrees F for 12 to 15 minutes on ungreased cookie sheet.Yields 36 cookies.


http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 15 2009 8:09:34 PM
Message:

Sourdough Spice Cookies with Maple Frosting

1/4 cup soft shortening
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 egg
1/2 cup molasses
1/2 cup sourdough starter
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon cloves
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 tablespoon hot water
2 cups flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon gingerMix together the shortening, brown sugar, egg, molasses and sourdough starter. To this add baking soda dissolved in 1 tablespoon hot water.Sift together flour, salt, ginger, nutmeg, cloves and cinnamon, and add to the first mixture. Drop by teaspoon onto lightly greased cookie sheet and bake about 10 minutes in 350 degree F oven.When cool, frost with Maple Frosting.Maple Frosting: Blend thoroughly 1 cup confectioners` sugar, 1/4 teaspoon maple flavoring and 2 tablespoons cream or milk.


http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 15 2009 8:13:01 PM
Message:

These come from Adventures in Sourdough Cooking and Baking by Charles D. Wilford. If you like to cook with sourdough you chould get this book!!
Sourdough Oatmeal Cookies
1-1/2 cups sourdough starter
1 cup shortening
1 cup sugar
1/4 cup brown sugar
1 egg
1/4 cup cream or evaporated milk
1 tsp vanilla
2-1/2 cups flour
1/2 tsp baking soda
1 tsp salt
1 tsp ground cinnamon
3 cups rolled oats

Let all ingred. come to room temp. Cream shortening with sugar and brown sugar. Beat the egg and stir it in. Add the cream and beat until light and fluffy. Stir in starter and vanilla; mix well. Add soda , salt, and cinnamon to flour and mix well. Add this to batter, 1/2 at a time, stirring after each addition. Add oats 1/2 cup at a time and mix well. Drop by spoonfuls onto greased baking sheets. Bake in preheated 400 degree oven for 12-15 min. Cool on wire rack. Yield: 4 doz-3" cookies
note: 1 cup raisins or 1/2 cup chopped nuts may be added with oats.
This I got from here at TKL
* Exported from MasterCook *


http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 15 2009 8:24:02 PM
Message:

Black Bean and Chipotle Bread
Also known as
Mexicali Heat

This recipe was adapted from Mark Miller and Andrew Maclauchlan's "Flavored Breads - Recipes from the Mark Miller's Coyote Cafe"

I've never been to the Coyote Cafe, but I've heard only good things about it, and the flavored breads title got me interested. The book was being remaindered, so it was all the more attractive. It was worth full price. However, being a sourdough fan(atic), I didn't want to make this bread with a sponge, the way Mark Miller and Andrew Maclauchlan do. So, it's been converted to sourdough. It is a moist, well risen loaf, that is rich with black beans, and warmed by the chipotle peppers. Mark Miller says it's reminiscent of a black bean soup, and I have to agree, but it's the smoky pepper bite that really makes this pepper-belly happy. Makes 3 good-sized loaves or 2 large loaves.

When we were running our bakery, we had trouble giving this bread away. Until we changed the name to "Mexicali Heat" - it just goes to shoe you that a name does matter, William Shakespear not withstanding. No matter what you call this bread, I think you'll like it.

Ingredients:
2 cups active sourdough starter
2 cups (1 lb) dried black beans, picked through and rinsed
1 cup reserved cooking liquid
3 1/2 cups bread flour
2/3 cup whole wheat flour
2 1/2 teaspoons salt
3/4 teaspoon ground cumin
3/4 teaspoon dried Mexican oregano, or 1 1/4 tsp dried regular Oregano
8 dried chipotle chiles, stemmed and chopped (about 1/4 cup ), or 5 teaspoons canned minced chipotles
1 1/3 tablespoons barbecue sauce


Method:
1. Do whatever you need to do to prepare two cups of active sourdough starter. While the starter is fermenting away go to step 2.

2. Pick over and clean the 2 cups of black beans. Cook until done. Make sure they are fully cooked.

3. Next drain the beans, reserving 1 cup of the cooking liquid per batch of bread. If you don't have that much cooking liquid left, dilute the liquid with water to make 1 cup of liquid per batch.

4. Pulse the cooked beans in a food processor about a cup at a time until they are chunky, but not pureed. Try not to leave any beans whole and intact. The texture of the bean puree will affect the texture of the bread - you choose how smooth or chunky you want the bread.

5. Pour the reserved cooking liquid into a large mixing bowl.

6. Add the beans and sourdough starter to the cooking liquid.

7. Remove and discard the stems from the peppers. Chop the chipotle peppers. If you are using dried peppers this will be messy as they are dry and brittle. Use all the pepper, and the seeds as well.

8. Add and stir in the whole wheat flour, chipotle peppers, cumin, oregano, salt, and barbecue sauce.

9. Stir, and add the bread flour a cup at a time, until the dough becomes too stiff to stir. Pour out the dough into a well floured surface.

20. Knead the dough, kneading in additional flour as needed, until the dough is fairly smooth and springy. You may need to add more flour than is called for above, depending on how liquid the beans are. Knead 6 to 10 minutes. The dough should be soft and lively.

11. Transfer the dough to a lightly oil ed bowl, turn, and cover with plastic wrap.

12. Let rise in a warm place for 1 - 2 hours, or until approximately doubled in volume.

13. Punch the dough down, transfer to a well-floured surface, and cut into 2 or 3 equal pieces.

14. Sprinkle a baking sheet with cornmeal (or spray with Baker's Joy).

15. Shape the dough into loaves. Mark and Andrew suggested round loaves, I made oval loaves instead.

16. Place the loaves on the baking sheet, cover with a moistened and wrung out linen cloth, and let rise again in a warm place for 1 hour.

17. The original recipe calls for a baking stone. I suggest you use a baking stone or quarry tiles. Whether or nor not you such, preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.

18. You may spay the loaves with water, and then lightly dust them with whole wheat flour. I didn't. However, you can get much the same effect with a banneton.

19. Make 2 or 3 diagonal slashes in the tops of the loaves with a razor blade to allow the dough to expand in the hot oven.

20. Put the bread in the oven, and put a cup of water into a tray on the bottom of your oven. (I use a disposable baking pan to hold the water.)

21. Bake for 35 to 40 minutes, or until the crust is caramel brown, and the loaf is done. While some people like the "thump" test, I prefer to take the bread's temperature with a quick reading thermometer. At my altitude, I shoot for an internal temperature is 195 degrees F. At sea level, I'd try for 205 to 210F.

22. Cool the loaves on a rack.


http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 15 2009 8:25:13 PM
Message:

Seven Grain Cereal Bread

This bread is based on a recipe from "Natural Health" magazine. It is a very, very nice bread. It was supposed to use quick rising yeast to get the bread ready to bake in less than an hour. You know how I feel about that… so the recipe went into the lab, and has been reformed. A warning… this bread has enough fiber to keep a regiment ahhhh... well... regular. If you are not used to a very high fiber diet, be careful with this bread. These loaves were allowed to rise in a banneton, a wicker basket that is lined with a floured cloth. The basket helps the loaf achieve its distinctive shape.

Ingredients:
1 cup starter
1 cup water
1 1/8 cups White Flour
1 1/2 cups Whole Wheat Flour
2 tsp Salt
2 tbsp oil
2 tsp Barley malt extract (available in health food stores)
1 tbsp rolled oats
1/2 cup 7grain cereal (I've been used Arrowhead Mills and Bob's Red Mill)
1 1/2 cups water
3/4 cups 7grain cereal
1/2 cups Toasted seeds (opt) (see note)

Some preparatory steps:

If you want to turn this into seeded seven grain bread, which I recommend, add 1 more tsp malted barley to the recipe, and about 1/2 cup of toasted seeds. I use 1/4 cup of sunflower seeds, 2 tbsp flax seeds, 2 tbsp sesame seeds, and 1 tsp poppy seeds. Toast 'em in a hot dry skillet until fragrant. Set them aside and let them cool.

Cook 1/2 cup of the cereal in 1 1/2 cups water. Cook until the water is absorbed. Don't add salt, the bread has enough as it is. Once cooked, let the cereal cool to reasonable temperature.

You may grind the remaining 3/4 cup of cereal in a spice or coffee grinder, although I haven't ground the rest of the cereal, and the bread has been just fine.

Once the seeds, if you're going to use them, and the cereal are cool, continue….

Whisk the water, starter, barley malt, the cooked and cooled cereal, and the oil together. Add and whisk in the ground cereal, whole wheat flour, salt and whisk together. Add the white flour. Add the seeds, if you are making seeded seven-grain bread –and remember to add an extra ½ tsp of the malted barley extract.

Mix in white flour, and knead until it's ready. The windowpane test is NOT appropriate here. The bread is a pain to knead, and because of the variable amount of water in the cooked cereal, it will take some adjustment in the amount of flour. Add a mixture of white and whole wheat flour. I have doubled the amount of flour in this recipe on some occasions. Trust your feeling for the dough, and go with the flow.

Form the dough into a ball, place into the cleaned and oil ed mixing bowl, turn the ball over, and then cover. Let the bread rise.

Once the bread has doubled in size, deflate the bread, knead again, and then shape into loaves. I like to let this bread rise in a basket to get a round loaf.

When loaves have risen, brush them with water and gently press the rolled oats into top of loaf.

Slash the loaves and bake at 400F for about 40 minutes.


http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 15 2009 8:31:12 PM
Message:

Sourdough Oatmeal Coconut Cookies
1/2 cup shortening
1 1/2 cups brown sugar
2 each eggs
1/2 cup buttermilk
1/2 cup sourdough start
2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon soda
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon allspice
1 1/2 cups rolled oats
1 1/2 cups flaked or shredded coconut
1 cup raisins
1/2 cup chopped nutmeats

Cream shortening, sugar and eggs until light and fluffy. Stir in buttermilk and start. Add dry ingredients and stir well. Fold in rolled oats, coconut, raisins and nuts. Drop small gobs onto cookie sheet about 2 inches apart. Bake at 375 degrees for 10 to 12 minutes.



http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 15 2009 8:32:53 PM
Message:

Sourdough Sugar Cookies
1 cup vegetable shortening
2 cups sugar
3 eggs
1 1/2 teaspoons lemon extract or almond extract
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/2 cup sourdough starter
4 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
Lemon-Milk Frosting (see recipe below)
In a large bowl, cream vegetable shortening and sugar. Beat in eggs, lemon or almond extract and vanilla extract until mixture is fluffy. Stir in sourdough starter; set aside. In a medium bowl, stir together flour, baking soda, and salt; stir into sourdough mixture. Refrigerate dough, covered, at least 1 hour or overnight.
Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. On a lightly floured board, roll dough to 1/4-inch thick; cut into desired shapes with cookie cutters. Place 1 inch apart onto ungreased cookie sheets.
Bake 8to 10 minutes or until very lightly browned on the bottoms. Remove from oven and cool on wire racks. When cool, frost with Lemon-Milk Frosting and decorate as desired.
Yields 3 to 5 dozen cookies (depending on the size of cookie you make).
Lemon-Milk Frosting:
2 cups powdered (confectioners) sugar
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
2 tablespoons milk
In a small bowl, combine powdered sugar, lemon extract, and enough milk to make frosting easy to spread. Tint, if desired, with a few drops of food coloring.
NOTE: Depending on the size of your cookies, you might need to double the frosting recipe.



http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 15 2009 8:36:39 PM
Message:

Sourdough pretzel recipe
Yield: 20 pretzels, about 4 to 5 inches across, hard crust, soft center.

1-1/2 cups proofed batter
1 cup hot water
2 tablespoons butter
3 tablespoons sugar
2 teaspoons salt
5-1/2 cups all purpose flour

coarse salt

1. Let all ingredients and utensils come to room temperature
2. Add the 2 tablespoons butter, the 3 tablespoons, sugar, and the 2 tsp salt to the cup of hot water. Cool to lukewarm.
3. Put the proofed batter into a warm bowl. Add the cooled water mixture.
4. Add 4 cups of flour, 1/2 cup at a time, stirring after each addition.
5. Turn out onto a floured board and knead in approximately 1-1/2 cups more of the flour. The dough will be very stiff. (gk: They ain't kiddin'!)
6. Place the dough in a greased bowl, turn over, and cover. Let set for 2 hours to proof.
7. On a board which has been scraped clean of flour break of pieces of the dough about the size of a large egg. Roll each piece out with the palm of your hands until it is about 18 inches long and about 1/2 inch in diameter. Twist into the shape of a pretzel.
8. Bring a pot of water to a rapid boil. Drop as many pretzels as will fit without touching into the water and cook about 30 seconds after they have risen to the top. (Or longer, if you like a chewier pretzel.)
9. Remove to a baking sheet and sprinkle with coarse salt.
10. Bake in a preheated 425*F oven for 15 minutes, until golden brown. Remove and cool on wire racks.

http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: ginnybee
Replied on: Mar 15 2009 8:40:29 PM
Message:

Success! After several days of planning and following others' progress on the forum, I baked my own wild-yeast bread. My house is on the cool side, and my mother - though bubbly - didn't seem very active (no hooch). I put the dough in my 5 qt. dutch oven and let it rise for about 9 hours. I knew it would be flat because of the large container but it still rose and tasted wonderful. I can't believe I made bread with just flour and water. I'm converted. I used distilled water and organic flour - I started with all purpose organic flour from my coop (it's Wheatland Flour from Utah, in case anyone cares). Halfway through the week, I remembered that I had organic bread flour (same miller, I think) and switched to that.


Reply author: Liz103811
Replied on: Mar 16 2009 03:59:59 AM
Message:

Thank you so much for the pumpernickel bread recipe. I followed your directions exactly. The bread is delicious! I would highly recommend this recipe. I never would have guessed there is coffee and cocoa in pumpernickel bread.


Reply author: candela59
Replied on: Mar 16 2009 05:00:31 AM
Message:

Good morning ladies! I just love being a part of this group. I'm sitting here drinking delicious Colorado Chokecherry tea and reading all of your positive thoughts and comments and drooling over the recipes and pictures. I don't even like brownies but I sure wanted one after seeing that beautiful picture!

I can't wait to get started. I live in a very small town and am having a heck of a time finding flour and even a large enough mixing bowl. I made a 90 mile round-trip Friday in search of baking equipment with no luck. I'm just going to look on the internet and order the bowls.

My DH works for the oil fields here in Colorado, we rent a completely furnished home and all of my considerable cooking equipment is back home in Washington! I miss it! So, today I'm headed to the "fancy" grocery store in search of flour, Walmart in one last effort for mixing bowls and I'm hoping I get to start my starter this afternoon. Otherwise it is www.cooking.com for me! Wish me luck!



www.thewanderlustgirl.blogspot.com


Reply author: Bellepepper
Replied on: Mar 16 2009 07:53:17 AM
Message:

I got my first batch of bread made Sat night. Like Ginny, I used a dutch oven that was a little too big so my bread was kind of falt. But the tast was so very sour dough! I have everyone on the lookout for a smaller cast iron pan. Yesterday, I made a batch of soft cheese and needless to say, the bread was gone in no time. And I didn't get to season the cheese until it was about half gone.

So now I have a question, Now that I have started my daily additions again, Do I have to wait until Sat to make bread? Would like to make some on Friday.


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 16 2009 08:27:47 AM
Message:

WOW - Lisa! That's Really All I can say! WOW! I'll add all of the recipes to the index tonight and repost it!

Liz - thanks for the compliments. I researched the recipe and took elements from a lot of different ones I saw. I was out of cocoa and didn't add it to mine when I made it so mine was lighter in color. I thought surely Coffee would alter the flavor but when I took a bite it was EXACTLY what I had been expecting!

Peggy - you can order flour from MaryJane! Here is the link http://shopping.maryjanesfarm.org/s.nl/it.A/id.1891/.f

It is a little expensive but SO WORTH IT! I have been experimenting with several different kinds and MaryJanes is just superior! I just got a 20# box in the mail! Thats a lot of flour!!!

Belle - You should be fine to use it on Friday. I use mine all days of the week. If you want to bake more than once (or use more than 2 cups of starter per week) you will want to double your feedings a couple days a week.)

Ginny - So glad you had success!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: nin1952
Replied on: Mar 16 2009 08:38:28 AM
Message:



All of these recipes sound so good (except the fruit cake). No, it's not because it's "fruit cake". I don't drink alcoholic beverages and there is not anything to use except brandy and such things. Oh well, on to more important things. I have a question. Do any of you use "Pampered Chef" products? They have stone bakeware. I have thought about ordering the loaf pan. My daughters love to use these products. They think they're wonderful. (uhoh, did that sound like I'm selling this product?) No, no, no!

All of you have a very BLESSED Day.


Reply author: gramax18
Replied on: Mar 16 2009 09:05:01 AM
Message:

Peggy,
You can get KA flour at the City Market in Rifle. There is also a antoque store there on 3rd st. that might have a bowl that you can use.

Elinor


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 16 2009 09:13:22 AM
Message:

Coffee and chocolate--I made the chocolate cake this week and my recipe called for either expresso powder or one cup of strong coffee. The reason stated in the recipe is that it brings out the flavor of your chocolate.

I'm an internet/computer geek and a little OCD. Had a horrible day with my back yesterday, so posting the recipes was a good project to keep me busy. Never can do anything half way. My late husband said that I had 2 speeds...the speed of light or off.

Once your starter is well established (meaning you are getting results that make you happy), then in my opinion it is ok to use it whenever you like. I bake when the spirit moves me now, and just feed mother according to my plans for the week.

http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: janiee
Replied on: Mar 16 2009 11:14:09 AM
Message:

It's been awhile since I posted anything here. Was having a wonderful time with "ethel" until I took my mom to visit her sisters one day and my dh fed her with a METAL spoon! We laid her to rest last Wednesday and started again last thursday. Ethel #2 is doing really well and bubbly! looking forward to my bread again...needless to say my dh will NOT be using any metal spoons for awhile :) I bought him a new set of wooden ones just for him.
janiee
farmgirl #390


Reply author: Sandra K. Licher
Replied on: Mar 16 2009 12:12:03 PM
Message:

Well....I lost ALL my subscriptions to topics so I am testing here as my first one to see if I get notified....I must have had too many and they are now GONE!!! LOL! That'll teach me!

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com


Reply author: candela59
Replied on: Mar 16 2009 2:12:32 PM
Message:

Elinor~ I just noticed a couple of pages back that you're from Meeker and I was going post a note to you to say what a small world! I went to City Market just this morning and was successful with the KA flour. I was at the Antique shop the other day with no luck, but found some things this morning at WalMart! Thanks for the tips. DH and I have a very good friend in Meeker, Andrea. In fact, we stayed in Meeker for the first couple of months that we were in Colorado.

Lisa and Julie~ Thanks for all of the encouragement!

Well, I got home and mixed up my starter so that I can bake on Sunday. I can't wait!! I'll keep everyone posted!

www.thewanderlustgirl.blogspot.com


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 16 2009 3:48:22 PM
Message:

Dropped by the public library today! Found no books in our library specifically with sourdough, but did find 3 bread & baking books that have sections about sourdough. Going to read through them and will share any good recipes. I will check for inter-library loan books on sourdough after I get through these.

http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: mimilou
Replied on: Mar 16 2009 3:56:35 PM
Message:

How much of your mother should you leave in the bowl after you've removed some for baking? I doubled up this past week, and used 4 cups Saturday and now want to bake tomorrow - just one loaf. I'm still not sure how much i need to add to make sure I have enough.


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 16 2009 7:14:01 PM
Message:

As long as you have even a little bit left it will help get your new additions of flour and water going. I would say anything more than a 1/4 cup and you are golden! You could get by on less.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 16 2009 7:17:23 PM
Message:

Mimilou, i'd try to leave at least one cup of mother in reserve.

Can't remember if anyone posted the recipe for sourdough english muffins here on the forum or not. If it hasn't been posted I do have a recipe. However, a tip that I saw tonight in one of the books from the library was using tuna fish cans as a mold for making them. Yup! Take the empty tuna can and wash it really well. Remove the label and both the top and bottom of the can. Then you are left with a nice recycled mold to make your muffins!

http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: Ronna
Replied on: Mar 16 2009 7:31:42 PM
Message:

I posted an english muffin recipe sometime back. Most tuna cans are not made to be opened on both ends anymore. A large biscuit cutter will work fine.
Peter Reinhart has done a great job of research on sourdough and related types of starters. Many bread baking books with just a few pages on sourdough aren't ones to give the best info or recipes.


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 16 2009 10:22:14 PM
Message:

Well Ronna, guess I'm just wrong on all accounts. I'll be quiet and leave it to the experts.

http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: lisa229
Replied on: Mar 17 2009 06:51:10 AM
Message:

I started my starter(make sense?LOL) last week and baked my first loaf this weekend....it came out kinda chewy, almost like it didn't bake all the way, but the batter was super thick and had skin on it - I'm thinking from the dry towel the first week. So now I've been adding to it this week and it is perfect consistency. I think my bread this weekend will come out awesome. Can't wait! It's bubbling, smells like sour dough, and is thinner - no skin on top - I started using the wet towel on Sunday.

Lisa
http://lisa22968.blogspot.com/


Reply author: Calicogirl
Replied on: Mar 17 2009 09:17:42 AM
Message:

Ronna,

I made your English Muffins this morning (actually made the sponge last night). Oh my! Hubby is in heaven :) Thanks again!

~Sharon

By His Grace, For His Glory


Reply author: Ronna
Replied on: Mar 17 2009 09:21:44 AM
Message:

Great! They are so pricey in the store-but then, what isn't. Nice to have your own fresh and much better too! They freeze well too, especially if you split them first so they'll be ready for toasting.


Reply author: QueenofQuiteAlot
Replied on: Mar 17 2009 09:57:30 AM
Message:

My starter is doing nicely on the counter, now only 3 days old. I look forward to baking soon though! I used the King Arthur whole wheat flour and I have well water, so time will tell.

Dalyn

~Hick Chicks Soap Barn ~
www.hickchickssoapbarn.com


Homespun Raw Goat Milk Soaps 'n More


http://muckbootsnaprons.blogspot.com/
http://proverbs31nubians.blogspot.com/

Muckboots 'N Aprons at Home Chapter
http://yakimafarmgirls.blogspot.com/


Reply author: lisa229
Replied on: Mar 17 2009 10:53:32 AM
Message:

I have well water too Dalyn and it worked fine. I used Amish flour - must be organic since it worked fine...
What kind are you going to make?
I want to try the english muffins everyone's been talking about.

Lisa
http://lisa22968.blogspot.com/


Reply author: candela59
Replied on: Mar 17 2009 2:24:01 PM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by Ronna

I posted an english muffin recipe sometime back. Most tuna cans are not made to be opened on both ends anymore. A large biscuit cutter will work fine.
Peter Reinhart has done a great job of research on sourdough and related types of starters. Many bread baking books with just a few pages on sourdough aren't ones to give the best info or recipes.



Ronna~ I'm fairly new to this board. I would love an English muffin recipe. Do you have any idea what page you posted it on or even the approximate date and I could look for it myself?





www.thewanderlustgirl.blogspot.com


Reply author: ruralfarmgirl
Replied on: Mar 17 2009 3:38:42 PM
Message:

you girls make my head spin and my tummy growl... but I am off to bake another loaf of basic farmhouse bread.... I tend to be more of a "plain jane" then the whole lot of you............but I must say... I have tried a few of the recipes and you gals are amazing.. thanks for all the recipes they are awesome! As a side note.. I decided to read through the whole thread today... and WOW... literally my head is spinning.. I feel a little like,
"I cant believe I ate the whole thing" but boy was it good!

Rene~Prosser Farmgirl #185
http://farmchicksfarm.blogspot.com/http://renenaturallyspeaking.blogspot.com/



Circumstances made us FRIENDS; MaryJane's has made us SISTERS :)


Reply author: Calicogirl
Replied on: Mar 17 2009 5:48:00 PM
Message:

Peggy,

Here it is :)

Sourdough English Muffins

1 cup sourdough starter
1 ½ cups milk
5 1/2 to 6 cups flour
1 T sugar
1 T sea salt
1 tsp baking soda

To make sponge: In a ceramic or glass bowl, mix starter, milk and 5 cups of flour. Cover with plastic wrap, and let sit UNREFRIGERATED for 7-24 hours.

To make dough: Mix sugar, salt, baking soda and ½ cup flour, kneading into the sponge – it will be too thick to stir – no more than 2 minutes. Cover with plastic wrap, letting it rest for an hour. (There’s still ½-cup remaining flour. Some of it can be added in if this dough feels too sticky. You want a dough that resembles a good biscuit dough – not too sticky, not too dry.

Kneading & Shaping: Lightly flour your kneading board and hands – dough will be “soft”. Knead for only 2-3 minutes, just until the dough is smooth, no longer lumpy. Roll it out between ¼ and ½-inch thickness.

Cut out 3 to 4-inch diameter circles. Place on a cornmeal sprinkled cookie sheet, letting rest for at least 15-minutes, but 30 is better. Note: I didn’t use cornmeal as I don’t care for the flavor. Ronna's notes..use Semolina flour, not so crunchy on the teeth and yet gives a bit of texture. Great for pizza too. Use a large biscuit cutter, if it's smaller than 3-4", that's okay. They'll bake/cook a bit faster and you'll have more of them to enjoy. Special EM cutters/forms are not needed. Specific type of flour (bread or all purpose) was not specified when the recipe was adapted, use what you have and they should be fine.

There are two cooking methods – either works well.

1. Stove top: Heat a lightly greased skillet, using a very low flame. I used ghee. Place cornmeal side down in the warmed skillet, cooking slowly for 10-minutes. Flip, cooking other side for another 10-minutes. Check for a light-brown color. Poke the sides to see if they’re cooked – not gooey.

2. Oven: Heat oven to 425-degrees. Place dough rounds on cornmeal dusted cookie sheet. Bake 8-10 minutes. Check bottom side for light brown coloration. Flip rounds over, cooking 6-8 minutes on the other side.

I tested both methods and preferred the oven method. The outside was more crispy, the inside more “fluffy” and light in texture, given the greater amount of heat that expanded the dough. Having said that, the skillet method resulted in English Muffins that were still superior to any store-bought


~Sharon

By His Grace, For His Glory


Reply author: Ronna
Replied on: Mar 17 2009 7:45:53 PM
Message:

Thanks Sharon. I'm not sure what page the list Julie made of recipes up to that date might be on-would be great if it could be moved to the first page, but likely not possible.


Reply author: Calicogirl
Replied on: Mar 17 2009 8:53:20 PM
Message:

Ronna,

I couldn't find the page so I just copy & pasted from my recipe file:)

~Sharon

By His Grace, For His Glory


Reply author: GailMN
Replied on: Mar 18 2009 06:32:22 AM
Message:

Good Morning - I just took brownies out of the oven - I sure wish you could have smelled them baking. Great recipe Julie, with excellent, easy directions. Don't know how long I can wait while they are cooling - hubby is anxious also. Tomorrow I am going to try the Gingerbread recipe that Lisa posted - I'll let you know! Have a great day - suppose to be 50 degrees here, so planning on spending the afternoon outside.

Gail


Farmgirl Sister #506
A Smile a Day . . .


Reply author: lisa229
Replied on: Mar 18 2009 07:01:08 AM
Message:

Thanks for posting that english muffin recipe! I'm going to try it.


Lisa
http://lisa22968.blogspot.com/


Reply author: candela59
Replied on: Mar 18 2009 08:26:34 AM
Message:

Sharon~ Thanks for finding the English Muffins forme! Now, I just need some rings or bisquit cutters.

I see that you're from SW Colorado...may I ask what area? I'm about 50 miles east of Grand Junction. It is such a small world!

Okay Everybody, my starter is now 3 days old and looking good! Just fed her this morning. I'm hoping to bake on Sunday. Now I just have to decide if I want to make a loaf of bread or use the starter in another type of recipe. Decisions, decisions!!

www.thewanderlustgirl.blogspot.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 18 2009 09:18:30 AM
Message:

I will post a new index tonight.


Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: carycamille
Replied on: Mar 18 2009 10:07:32 AM
Message:

Page 65 has an index on it.

Camille


Reply author: ruralfarmgirl
Replied on: Mar 18 2009 10:26:07 AM
Message:



I thought of you all this AM as I was pulling another loaf out of the oven nd fixing tea.....

Rene~Prosser Farmgirl #185
http://farmchicksfarm.blogspot.com/http://renenaturallyspeaking.blogspot.com/



Circumstances made us FRIENDS; MaryJane's has made us SISTERS :)


Reply author: Tina Kay
Replied on: Mar 18 2009 11:10:42 AM
Message:

Thanks for posting the recipe. My husband is going to be a real happy guy for breakfast in a few days.

Tina Kay

Now I get me up to work, I pray the Lord I may not shirk. If I should die before tonight, I pray the Lord my work's all right. Anon.


Reply author: Calicogirl
Replied on: Mar 18 2009 1:38:14 PM
Message:

Peggy,

I live in Dolores :) There is another gal Montrosegal (Laurie) that lives in Montrose :)

Try the pancakes (from page 13) too! They are awesome!

~Sharon

By His Grace, For His Glory


Reply author: QueenofQuiteAlot
Replied on: Mar 18 2009 1:47:51 PM
Message:



Here's my "mother" doing nicely on day four. Sweet and yeasty smelling- the best sourdough starter I have had. Can't wait to make bread with her...

Dalyn

~Hick Chicks Soap Barn ~
www.hickchickssoapbarn.com


Homespun Raw Goat Milk Soaps 'n More


http://muckbootsnaprons.blogspot.com/
http://proverbs31nubians.blogspot.com/

Muckboots 'N Aprons at Home Chapter
http://yakimafarmgirls.blogspot.com/


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 18 2009 5:28:12 PM
Message:

DAlyn - it looks good! I love your bowl!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 18 2009 5:39:12 PM
Message:

MaryJane’s Bread Article ..........................................pg. 1

Baked French Toast with Apples and Nuts................pg. 12

Pancakes.....................................................................pg. 13

Sanfrancisco Style Bread (Ronna) ............................pg. 13

Old Fashioned Biscuits (celticheart) .........................pg. 17

Pancakes (celticheart) ...............................................pg. 17

Croutons....................................................................pg. 18

Waffles.....................................................................pg. 19

Buttermilk Biscuits ..................................................pg. 27

Whole Wheat Biscuits .............................................pg. 27

Basic Biscuits...........................................................pg. 27

Pizza Crust ..............................................................pg. 32

Bagels......................................................................pg. 43

English Muffins (Ronna).........................................pg. 45

Carrot Cake ............................................................ pg. 47

Bread Machine White Bread w/ added yeast..........pg. 49

Pecan/Date Bread....................................................pg. 51

Dog Treats..............................................................pg 53
Banana Cake (pearlgirl).........................................pg 54
Honey Wheat Oatmeal Bread (parisknight)………pg 62
Croissant.....................……………………………..pg. 63
Pumpernickel Bread ………………………………pg. 65
Chocolate Chip Cookies(GailMN)…………………. Pg. 66
Cake Like Brownies………………………………..Pg. 67
Sideways Sourdough Fruit Cake(lupinelady99)………………………….pg. 67
Sourdough Gingerbread with Lemon Sauce(lupinelady99)…………………..pg. 67
Sourdough Bran Bread(lupinelady99)…………………………….pg. 67
Sourdough Applesauce Cake(lupinelady99)……………………pg. 68
Sourdough Chiffon Cake(lupinelady99)………………………pg. 68
Sourdough Peanut Butter Cookies(lupinelady99)…………….pg. 68
Sourdough Spice Cookies with Maple Frosting(lupinelady99)……pg. 68
Sourdough Oatmeal Cookies(lupinelady99)……………pg. 68
Black Bean and Chipotle Bread(lupinelady99)…………pg. 68
Seven Grain Cereal Bread(lupinelady99)……………..pg. 68
Sourdough Oatmeal Coconut Cookies(lupinelady99)……..pg. 68
Sourdough Sugar Cookies(lupinelady99)………………pg. 68
Sourdough pretzel recipe(lupinelady99)………………pg. 68


I am cutting and pasting this from my word doc. so I have no idea why it changes size and spacing in the middle. Sorry if it is weird.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: candela59
Replied on: Mar 18 2009 7:17:12 PM
Message:

Julie~ Thanks for the recipe index. I just copied and pasted it to a word document for safe keeping :)

www.thewanderlustgirl.blogspot.com


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 19 2009 12:17:31 PM
Message:

Ran across this and wanted to share with the group: I was putting laundry away today and thought of this. Don't know if it will apply to anyone, but it feels worth sharing. I received some kitchen towels as a gift that are "anti-microbial". It is nothing that I would have bought and in fact I won't even use them on dishes (only to dry hands). Now I know that some of us are covering mother with a damp towel. Don't know if these towels would hurt your mother, but who wants to chance losing mother to something like this.

http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: lisa229
Replied on: Mar 19 2009 1:29:51 PM
Message:

Dalyn - your starter looks awesome! Mine looks like yours so I'm glad. Love your bowl too....
Lisa - I would think the thin cotton ones work best for covering your mother - I won't even chance my terry cloth ones....
But I was thinking of making special starter ones with muslin and finishing the edges. Does anyone know if that's okay to use? Same thing, isn't it?


Lisa
http://lisa22968.blogspot.com/


Reply author: Quintessential Kate
Replied on: Mar 19 2009 2:31:54 PM
Message:

Personally, I like cheesecloth....and that's what I've been using for the past 2 plus months. I buy organic from my healthfood store.
Just my 2 cents worth!
Ciao, Kate

Heart of Texas
Chapter
AKA: Hot Farmgirl #234
http://quintessentialkate.blogspot.com

Today is my best day!


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 19 2009 3:10:45 PM
Message:

I haven't bought kitchen towels in ages so don't know how common that "anti-microbial" is. I do know that you see it in so many products out there and those of us that try to live more organically/greener try to avoid it. It was just something that I thought worth a mention. I've got some nice older towels that work great that came from my sons' great grandmother that are the perfect weight and size for baking & mother. I don't used the clothes dryer for the most part, so towels seem to last forever for me.

http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: amberjsquirrel
Replied on: Mar 19 2009 4:31:56 PM
Message:

I just had to tell you that I finally had success baking! This is mother's fourth week and I made the olive-garlic-rosemary bread. It had a fabulous texture and crumb, and of course, a great flavor. I'm so pleased. I was beginning to get frustrated with my weekly "doorstops". I still want to be able to make the basic farmhouse white, but it hasn't turned out well yet. Maybe it will next time!

Thanks to everyone for their inspiration!
Amber


Farmgirl #505
"One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries." --A.A. Milne


Reply author: GailMN
Replied on: Mar 19 2009 5:00:40 PM
Message:

Way to go Amber - so happy for your success - someone said in an earlier post that sourdough baking is an addiction - and I have to agree. I have baked 2 times this week and will again tomorrow. My neighbors and family are loving it. My hubby's favorite is the carrot cake and the pancakes. I have a few recipes I would like to convert to sourdough, but haven't ventured down that path yet!

Gail


Farmgirl Sister #506
A Smile a Day . . .


Reply author: Sewsmartie
Replied on: Mar 19 2009 5:06:35 PM
Message:

I am hoping for sucess tonight. I will mix it and back in the morning. Like Amber, I do not want another door stop! California is warmed up a bit so perhaps "Mama" will do better on my kitchen counter. I still wonder if I can use my bread oven for this. I did not get a reply. Unless the bread is in a container I do not seem to achieve the "artisan" look. How I wish I could as I would love to make bread bowls like Panera serves!

Sewsmartie


Reply author: Calicogirl
Replied on: Mar 19 2009 6:38:57 PM
Message:

Ronna,

I made your San Francisco Style bread (page 13) today. It is wonderful!!! I did tweek the recipe a little :) I used my bread machine's dough only cycle and only needed to add 4 cups of flour. My husband is on his third slice right now :) Thanks again!

I am looking forward to trying Julie's Brownie recipe soon :)

~Sharon

By His Grace, For His Glory


Reply author: lisa229
Replied on: Mar 20 2009 06:43:44 AM
Message:

Kate, I never thought to use cheesecloth! Thanks! I have some...
Lisa, if they're the "going green" stuff, they'd probably be fine. I never heard of anti-microbial....now of course I'll be looking...LOL
Congrats Amber on your successful baking!!
I think I'm just going to try the basic farmhouse white this weekend.
If my "rest" day is on Saturday, can I take my 2 cups out that day but not mix or bake it till Sunday? Do I just leave it resting in a separate bowl and then add my stuff on Sunday and bake?


Lisa
http://lisa22968.blogspot.com/


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 20 2009 08:00:57 AM
Message:

If you want to wait til Sunday to bake I would suggest you leave it in the same bowl and just take out what you need for baking on Sunday BEFORE you feed the starter.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: lisa229
Replied on: Mar 20 2009 12:09:19 PM
Message:

okay - thank you Julie...


Lisa
http://lisa22968.blogspot.com/


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 21 2009 06:02:20 AM
Message:

Ok, this might be a foolish question but just need to know the answer....

Why do we give mother a day of rest each week?

http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: Bellepepper
Replied on: Mar 21 2009 07:38:46 AM
Message:

Lisa, I don't know but my mother is resting today also. I have my second loaf setting to rise today. It is cool and raining today. I hope it don't have an effect on my dough. I put it in the oven with the light on. That seems to be the warmest place in the house. Can't wait till this eve when I can bake it. Hope this loaf last longer than the first one I made. My grandsons came in and took over. I wonder if they know that I am baking a loaf every Saturday.

Which brings up a question. How can I expand my mother? How much do you need to start a second mother? One loaf a week is not enough. This question might have been answered before but don't have time to read all 72 pages of this topic. LOL


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Mar 21 2009 07:55:03 AM
Message:

Hi Lisa-
That isn't a foolish question at all! It is just because of the math amounts of flour and water that Mary Jane recommends. If you feed the mother every day, and then baked always using her recipes, you would slowly gain extra starter- and in a couple weeks your starter would have doubled in size. So by taking one day off, you will always have the right amount to bake with, with just the right amount left over to continue the starter for the next week's baking.

Belle if you want to bake multiple times a week, just multiply the base amounts of starter feeder (flour and water) that is in the original instructions by the times you want to bake (or batches) you want to bake each week. So I am going to do a few examples below to show:

For one baking a week you feed daily:
1/3 Flour + 1/4 cup water = 1 weekly baking

For two bakings a week you feed daily

[ 1/3 * 2 ]flour + [ 1/4 * 2 ]water = 2 weekly baking
so that means:
2/3 flour + 1/2 water = 2 weekly bakings

3 bakings a week would then be:
[ 1/3 * 3 ] flour + [ 1/4 * 3 ] water = 3 weekly bakings
so that means:
1 cup flour + 3/4 water = 3 weekly bakings.

I hope that helps!


Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 21 2009 08:06:17 AM
Message:

Thanks Alee. Just always wondered about that is all. Personally because I'm a rebellious sort I feed mother at least once a day, but sometimes as much as 3 feedings a day depending on what my baking plans are for the week. I try to give her a day off here and there to allow for the "sour flavor" to develop. With the multiple feedings, it works better for me to split them up over the course of a day rather than to just dump it all in at once. It seems to be easier to stir everything up better that way and I thought it might be better for the yeast to have it split up. Don't know that there is any "science" to back that theory up, lol. I guess we will all develop our own styles from MJ's blueprint.

http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: Bellepepper
Replied on: Mar 21 2009 09:18:49 AM
Message:

Thanks Alee, that will work for me. I didn't want to have 2 bowls of mother sitting on the counter. So starting tomorrow, I'll add 2/3 cup flour and 1/2 cup of water daily. I will bake later in the week and again on Sat. Letting Mother rest on Saturday.


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 21 2009 12:22:34 PM
Message:

Belle - I have doubled mine one week and then knowing I wasn't going to bake a lot the following week reduced back down to normal feedings. I have not had any problems with this.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Calicogirl
Replied on: Mar 21 2009 2:55:04 PM
Message:

I'm baking more Sourdough bread today and I made Julie's Brownies :) It's killing me not eating them yet but they are for after dinner :) They look and smell divine!

Girls,

I have been sharing my starter with friends too!

~Sharon

By His Grace, For His Glory


Reply author: ginnybee
Replied on: Mar 21 2009 3:46:58 PM
Message:

I doubled-up on a few feedings for Mom and made the multigrain bread on Thursday. It was wonderful - rose more than the last loaf. Still looking around for a 2 qt. pan (I never buy new until I've exhausted all the nearby thrift stores) so I used the big Dutch oven again.
I hadn't scraped the sides (I'd heard that if I let it dry on the sides, I could keep the dried up bits as dried starter) and discovered mold this morning! The mold was high on the sides so I used my silicone ladle to remove most of the mother from the bottom to a different bowl. Chances are, she's infected and the mold will spread but I'm hoping for the best. I'd hate to have to start over.


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 21 2009 3:52:57 PM
Message:

Ginny - I think you will find that she will be fine once transferred to another bowl. I don't think you will need to start over.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: candela59
Replied on: Mar 21 2009 3:53:40 PM
Message:

Julie~ Those brownies look so good I'm thinking of baking them for my first try with the starter tomorrow! I just need to know what size baking dish you used. It looks like a 9x13 from the picture, but I can't really tell. I think nice warm brownies with some vanilla ice on top would make a good Sunday treat and a great way to introduce DH to sourdough baking! Thanks!

www.thewanderlustgirl.blogspot.com


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 21 2009 6:49:51 PM
Message:

It was actually an 8x11.5 but they were quite thick. I think a 9x13 would be fine. Also they were very cake-like when warm but when they cooled were more "fudgy" like a typical brownie.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: antoinette
Replied on: Mar 21 2009 8:43:58 PM
Message:

Hi, I kind of gave up on my sourdough because the last loaf was way toooo... sour. Any way I can get it to be less sour? Toni


Reply author: Quintessential Kate
Replied on: Mar 22 2009 05:35:23 AM
Message:

Toni,
I don't know if this is scientifically correct.....but when my Ma became too sour I doubled her feedings for a couple of days and made sure her cover stayed damp. That seemed to calm down the sour.
I personally like it pretty sour, but I was preparing my start to share with my "real" mother...and she is not crazy about the real sour flavor....so that's how I toned it down.
And just an FYI to go along with the feeding chatter..... I normally feed mine the 1/2 C.flour to the 1/4 C. water once a day, and let her rest on the day I bake. From time to time I will throw in 2/3 C.flour to 1/2 C. water when I know I want to bake a bit more during the week. My "Ma" is to the point where, as I have mentioned before, she if very forgiving for mistakes I occasionally make. My observation is that she is more like a Dog than a Cat. She is dependent on me to feed her....and is very happy when I do. I can occasionally give her a treat (the extra flour and water) and she almost dances, or at least her bubbles do. She's been around for so long now that the counter would look strange without her being there. She's a keeper.
Ciao, Kate

Heart of Texas
Chapter
AKA: Hot Farmgirl #234
http://quintessentialkate.blogspot.com

Today is my best day!


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 22 2009 06:52:13 AM
Message:

1. The day or two before baking, begin feeding your starter 2 times a day. But stop feeding about 12 hours before you plan to bake. (the idea behind this is that the starter will be more active altogether and will rise faster).

2. Utalize a shorter rise time. This can be accomplished by raising the temperature. Bread in a 75 degree location will rise twice as fast as that in a 55 degee location. Some say the longer you let it rise the more sourt it will be.

3. Use flours with a lower ash content. This would include all-purpose and bread flours. Whole wheat, rye or pumpernickle flours have a really high ash contents. Also white type flours with added rye flour have a higher ash content.


Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: mystree
Replied on: Mar 22 2009 7:46:46 PM
Message:

My first attempt at this sourdough got "baked" when someone decided to preheat the oven without removing the contents. My second smells horrible but will be ready to bake tomorrow. I've heard that as long as your starter doesn't mold or turn pink, you're OK. So, wish me luck. I'm doing a small loaf of white and a small loaf of cinnamon craisin (dried cranberries). I'll post and let you know how it turned out


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 22 2009 7:57:35 PM
Message:

Why does it smell horrible?

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Mar 22 2009 8:50:39 PM
Message:

I am having to dump my starter. Neither Doug nor I feel safe bringing her to the new house since really nasty molds had developed in the walls of the other house and we are worried about contaminating out new house. I am sure she is fine, but since a little flour, water and patience will give me a new starter- for our piece of mind we are starting over. I feel bad but at the same time relieved because I was really worried about bringing something dangerous over- even just on the glass or something. Ick.

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: candela59
Replied on: Mar 23 2009 06:10:35 AM
Message:

Well, I baked my first loaf yesterday. I was going to make brownies but decided I really wanted to try the bread. My whole reason for doing this is to make wholesome, fresh, delicious bread for DH and I. It turned out so bad that I actually laughed out loud! It was a hockey puck, a weapon, an ode to everything that can go wrong, will...

When I put it in the trash it made such a loud thunk you could hear it clear across the house. I baked it for over 45 minutes and there were still raw patches; and it was a small loaf. It never rose! DH was determined to eat it, bless his heart, but when he saw the slice I cut for him he decided to take my word for it that it wasn't edible!

But, not to be discouraged I am determined to try again. This morning I gave Ma a double dose feeding and will try again on Sunday. I'm going to double up the feedings so that I can try the Farm House loaf Sunday and those yummy looking brownies (thanks Julie!). So, here we go; again :)

www.thewanderlustgirl.blogspot.com


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Mar 23 2009 06:42:43 AM
Message:

How old was your starter, Peggy?

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: candela59
Replied on: Mar 23 2009 06:46:35 AM
Message:

Hi Alee~ it was just a week old. I've read some of the past posts where people didn't have success the first week or so. That's why I decided to give it at least another week and see what happens.

Also, this is just a general question: I live at 5300' and was wondering if the altitude made any difference? I've noticed there a couple of gals here from my area and I was wondering if any of you made adjustments for altitude?

I'm hoping for a better "bake" next Sunday... :)

www.thewanderlustgirl.blogspot.com


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Mar 23 2009 07:08:49 AM
Message:

Usually to adjust for altitude you add a little more flour. I live at 3,301 and haven't had to adjust.

If your bake isn't exactly perfect next week, don't get discouraged. It seems to take about 3-4 weeks for the starter to become really reliable. Now if you can help the rise along by keeping it around 80 degrees (warm sunny spot, warmed oven) etc. Then it seems to help the bread, also if you can keep your starter as close to 80 degrees for the next week then you will be giving the yeasts a prime growing temperature so you would hopefully have more yeast per cup than otherwise and therefore get a better rise.



Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: lisa229
Replied on: Mar 23 2009 07:09:10 AM
Message:

I baked my second loaf yesterday - I've had my starter now for 2 weeks. I made the Farmhouse white - it came out great! I was so proud! I took pictures of my batter and the bread - I made 4 orange size loaves so my husband could take two on the road with him and break them up easier. I'll post them later when I have some time. Now I want to buy a Cast iron pan to bake in - the one I have is too big. And I want to try the raisin cinnamon bread but add cranberries instead too - my husband loves cranberries but not raisins. I was so thrilled it worked! I need to buy more towels too - I only have one of the thin cotton ones, thought I had cheesecloth but I don't - and need to wash the towel that's been on it. Thanks for all the tips and information on this!

Lisa
http://lisa22968.blogspot.com/


Reply author: candela59
Replied on: Mar 23 2009 07:30:17 AM
Message:

Alee~ thanks for the pointers. I've been trying to keep "Mum" warm. We had blizzard warnings here last night so that's not too easy to do on a continual basis. Makes me wish for a gas oven with a pilot light! I'll try putting her on the kitchen counter this afternoon when the sun is coming in the west window... I'm not ready to give up yet!

Lisa~ Congrats on the successful baking! I was wondering if your first week also went well? I'm hoping my 2nd week is a success. I can't wait to try again Sunday. I also took pictures of my "hockey puck" and will try to post later...just for laughs!

www.thewanderlustgirl.blogspot.com


Reply author: GailMN
Replied on: Mar 23 2009 07:52:31 AM
Message:

Peggy - I have an electric kitchen range - I raise my bread in the oven with the light on - this would probably work well for your starter as well. Keep trying!

Gail


Farmgirl Sister #506
A Smile a Day . . .


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 23 2009 08:33:00 AM
Message:

Glad to see so many of us hanging in there! It was a mixed week for me. Tried to make rolls but they turned out like hockey pucks! The dogs are enjoying them though, lol! My loaf of bread had a nice rise and the texture is good. However, it is way way too sour. Tastes good with jam, but doesn't make the best sandwiches. I think it is a combination of leaving the loaf to rise too long and my starter getting very sour.

http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: Calicogirl
Replied on: Mar 23 2009 08:33:57 AM
Message:

Peggy,

Don't give up! My first time we called the loaves River Rocks. The starter seems to do better after the second week (for me anyway :))

We are at 6700 ft. and no problems :) The only adjustment I made was to Ronna's recipe. I used less flour and used the dough only cycle on my bread machine. It came out great!

~Sharon

By His Grace, For His Glory


Reply author: lisa229
Replied on: Mar 23 2009 09:06:07 AM
Message:

Peggy - my first week's loaf came out rock hard. This week came out great. Good luck this week! That sunny window should work.


Lisa
http://lisa22968.blogspot.com/


Reply author: candela59
Replied on: Mar 23 2009 09:25:53 AM
Message:

Thanks everyone for all of the encouragement!! I'll keep you all posted. Sunday is bake day for me :)

www.thewanderlustgirl.blogspot.com

"Happiness is not having what you want, it is wanting what you have."


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 23 2009 10:29:09 AM
Message:

Ok, I am trying a little "trial and error". My mother is so sour that you can actually smell the sour in the air when you come into my back door. Not a "bad smell" just the very strong smell of sourdough. I still have a fairly large mother, so I scooped out 1 cup and put it into reserve in case my trial doesn't work. Then to the remaining mother I have added 1/2 a teaspoon of baking soda with the usual feeding. My theory being that the sour comes from the acidity of sourdough. If I can tame the sour just a little, I'm hoping to make good tasty bread again. So far (just over 12 hours into the trial) mother is still bubbly and happy and smelling a little less sour than before. I'll let you know how this works when I do bread on Wednesday.

"we come from the Earth, we return to the Earth, and we garden in between"

http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Mar 23 2009 11:03:27 AM
Message:

The more your bake with your bread, the less sour she should be as well- I think that there are several stages of digestion of the flour for the yeast. Once the flour is 100% digested by the yeast the by product is the sourness and hooch. I think it takes a couple of days for it to get to the 100% digested phase. It's been my experience the if you are baking every 2-3 days then the sourness is greatly reduced. When I was baking small batches everyday and only feeding the amount that I wanted for starter the night before the bread didn't taste like sourdough to me at all- almost just like using yeast out of the packet except I knew I had raised this yeast myself.

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 23 2009 11:44:45 AM
Message:

Alee,

I haven't had any "hooch" with my starter so far. Have also been baking usually two or three times a week. The really sour developed after a change in the weather. We'd had some really nice days in the 50s & 60s and then crashed back the the teens and 20s. After the weather changed my starter changed texture a bit too. It became more like a drop cookie dough texture than like a waffle batter texture. No other changes (same bag of flour, same water, same environment). As I said before it is still happily working away and really doing everything it is supposed to be doing.

http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Mar 23 2009 12:17:55 PM
Message:

Isn't that interesting how the environment affects the starter because it is alive? I bet that your lactobacilus (part of the healthy sourdough mother) has really been thriving and the colder temperature might have put your yeasts to sleep a little bit. Hopefully as the warmer temperatures kick back in your starter will get back into balance a bit more for you.

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: lisa229
Replied on: Mar 23 2009 1:19:43 PM
Message:

Here's my batter, bread rising, and finished bread this past weekend. I hope this worked. If not, I'll try again.





Lisa
http://lisa22968.blogspot.com/


Reply author: ParisKnight
Replied on: Mar 23 2009 1:26:27 PM
Message:

Oatmeal quick bread

I had a family function this Saturday so didn't have time to wait for a rise so I thought I'd try a "quick" bread.

It worked really well so those of you who are having troubles or if you just don't want to wait for a rise you might try this. The bread comes out with a lighter texture then MaryJanes recipes. I think I am going to try a banana bread using this method next week. Tomorrow I am going to do the brownies.

1 cup milk
1 cup oatmeal
1/4 cup oil - I used vegetable
1 egg
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 cup honey
1 tsp vanilla
1 cup starter
1 tsp baking soda
1/2 cup white flour
1/2 cup wheat flour

Heat milk and pour over oats - allow oats to cool
Add wet ingredients to starter then add flour, salt and baking soda
Pour batter into 8 x 4 loaf pan
Bake at 400 for 45 minutes or so

No rise necessary


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 23 2009 1:45:42 PM
Message:

This time of year the weather goes through a lot of changes here. So, a month old starter probably is going to have some up and down days just like we do. Honestly as long as it is still functioning it is hard to find fault with it. Think maybe for Wednesday I'll do my normal bread and the dog biscuits to make sure that I bring the amount of starter down to between 1/2 and 1 cup maximum in reserve and start the building again. Normally I do at least a double batch of something twice a week anyway.

I think you are right about my lactobacilius because since switching the dog biscuits that I make over to sourdough from my regular recipe my basset hounds have had a much happier digestive tract.


http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 23 2009 4:15:12 PM
Message:

My starter changed drastically once the weather started warming up too.It is amazing!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: urban farm girl
Replied on: Mar 23 2009 4:26:56 PM
Message:

Yes the weather warming seemed to help my starter too. Did your brownies Julie and they were GGGRRREEATTT!! I found a stomboli recipe I want to make so I'll be making the pizza dough mmmmmmm.


Reply author: EarthKind
Replied on: Mar 23 2009 6:14:26 PM
Message:

HI Girls, I saw a mention of a pizza dough recipe and was wondering if anyone could tell me which page it's on? Thanks!

Farmgirl Sister #481


Reply author: antoinette
Replied on: Mar 23 2009 8:44:24 PM
Message:

Hi Angel,
A list of most of the recipes is on page 71.


Reply author: mystree
Replied on: Mar 23 2009 10:38:19 PM
Message:

My "mother" looked wonderful all week. I was not strong enough the stir the ingredients together in my mixing bowl so I opted to knead it briefly. My bread was a disaster. I used water when I baked it but the "crackle" was more like cement. It didn't rise worth beans after eight hours. I baked it anyway. It was dense and I had to peel it, but it tasted good. What did I do wrong?


Reply author: lisa229
Replied on: Mar 24 2009 06:54:40 AM
Message:

Barbara, that's what happened the first time I made mine. Same exact thing. The next week came out better. Maybe it was drafty? I'm trying to remember where I let mine rise....maybe that was the problem. My "mother" was super thick the first week tho - not wonderful like yours. Could climate or low/high pressure affect the rising?


Lisa
http://lisa22968.blogspot.com/


Reply author: candela59
Replied on: Mar 24 2009 07:26:58 AM
Message:

Well, two things to report. First, I finally named my starter "Mum" being a bonfide Anglophile...lol.

Second, and most importantly, Mum looks better this morning than any day since I started her. We're into the 2nd day of the 2nd week now. This morining she was very bubbly, no skin on top, pleasant smell. I feed her 1/2 cup of water and 2/3 cup of KA flour yesterday and I think the larger feeding may be what made the difference. I've decided to feed her double what MaryJane suggested in the article because I would like to bake more than once a week and also based on some of the comments for other gals here.

So, maybe I'm on the right track and I'll have a successful bake on Sunday. I'm thinking that quite a few of us didn't have successful first weeks from the comments. So, I'm keeping my fingers crossed for all of us! Good Luck!

www.thewanderlustgirl.blogspot.com

"Happiness is not having what you want, it is wanting what you have."


Reply author: lisa229
Replied on: Mar 24 2009 09:02:34 AM
Message:

Good luck Peggy! I'm glad to hear she's bubbly!


Lisa
http://lisa22968.blogspot.com/


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 24 2009 09:26:29 AM
Message:

The cement like crust was something that I had too. Using an egg wash on the top of the bread before baking made a HUGE difference. Thanks to the suggestion from the group!

http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: amberjsquirrel
Replied on: Mar 24 2009 12:02:21 PM
Message:

Hi everyone! I just wanted to report that I used a pampered chef stoneware mini loaf pan and it worked very well. The bottom and sides of the loaves was chewy and crunchy. I think it worked similar to my cast iron pot. It was rather fun to try it out. I had decluttered my kitchen and gave the pan to a neighbor last year. She had it on a top shelf and hadn't used it yet so now it is back in my kitchen and is finally useful. :)

I have a question about sharing my starter. My real mother (not the sourdough one) is visiting and is flying back home. Can I give her, say 1/2 cup in a sealed plastic container and she can put it in her checked baggage? Has anyone done this?

Have a beautiful day!
Amber



Farmgirl #505
"One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries." --A.A. Milne


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 24 2009 1:07:52 PM
Message:

in checked baggage it should be fine...for carry on you get into the 3 ounce rule & the quart zippie bag with the TSA

http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: Alee
Replied on: Mar 24 2009 5:49:52 PM
Message:

I would put a label on the baggie even in checked baggage- so they don't throw it away if they search her things.

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com


Reply author: ginnybee
Replied on: Mar 24 2009 7:42:44 PM
Message:

1. I have heard horror stories about exploding sourdough on airplanes. It should never be in a sealed container as it could explode. IMHO, sourdough is too old-fashioned for air travel.

2. The mold I noticed last week in the top of the bowl has not spread. I salvaged the mother by ladling her into another bowl. And now I make sure to keep the sides scraped down.

3. I've been reading a book called "Alaska Sourdough" which uses a slightly different sourdough recipe (potato water is involved). The author, Ruth Allman, says that baking soda cuts the sour (it's alkaline, "sour" is acid). Almost all of the book's recipes involve baking soda, but I'm not sure how to translate b/c her "mother" is different than the MJ mother. If anyone has success in using baking soda to cut down the sour, please share. My bread is delicious, but it would be nice to tone down the sour if desired. (I'll be trying the other suggestions, too.)

4. I'll be letting cinnamon-raisin rolls rise overnight for tomorrow's breakfast. I can hardly wait! YUM.


Reply author: mimilou
Replied on: Mar 25 2009 05:47:03 AM
Message:

All you recipe gals,
Do you have a recipe for blueberry bread? My daughter has put a request in and I'm not inventive. Thanks for any recipes you might have.


Reply author: candela59
Replied on: Mar 25 2009 06:14:15 AM
Message:

Just want to say 'Morning to everyone! Mum is looking even better today. She's so much more "alive" looking than last week. I can't wait to bake Sunday. Have a good one!

www.thewanderlustgirl.blogspot.com

"Happiness is not having what you want, it is wanting what you have."


Reply author: Farmers Daughter
Replied on: Mar 25 2009 07:26:30 AM
Message:

Well this is my 5th time baking. And my best loaf yet. Flavor and texture are both very good. It rose nicely in the pan, have been toasting and using for sandwiches. One thing I did do different and it wasn't cause I planned it. I always feed in the mornings. So I feed her Saturday and was to bake on Sunday (which is also her day of rest). Things came up and didn't get to bake on Sunday. So early Monday I pulled out my starter, mixed up my dough (used MJ recipe) and feed the mother. Put my dough in the loaf pan. (same metal pan I have been using, cause haven't gotten a cast iron on yet)Placed it in the slightly warmed oven with my steaming pot of water. Covered with a damp towel. Within 2 1/2 hours it was pushing up the towel and above the sides of the pan. I baked it and checked the temperature. I think that is very important when baking this heavier bread. I am glad the article suggests that, Cause I start to check when I think it's done, but sure enough it needs just a little more time. Usually about 10 min otherwise it would be gummy. Putting a foil tent on really help keep the crust from getting to brown.

I wonder is the starter was so hungry that it caused it to rise so fast??? I think Julie had mention you want at least 12 between feeding and baking with the starter, if memory serves. This would have been longer.

One other thing I did notice is the starter that I took out seemed more light.... Our house is very dry always have the humidifier going. My starter always has a slight crust on top even when wetting the towel.(Probably should do that more then once a day) Just stir it back in and it has been fine. So my starter might just be some what thicker then it should. But like I said when I took it out on Monday under the crust it seem way more airy or just a different consistency.
Maybe I need to add just a little more water to her???

Those of you just getting started. Hang in there. It does just take time for your mother to kick into gear and develop. Thanks to all who kept reminding me to do so.


Reply author: City_Chick
Replied on: Mar 25 2009 07:30:53 AM
Message:

Well I made my first loaf at the end of last week and it turned out great! I was so surprised because after being "burned" a few times by sourdough starters I was leary. I am now a convert. I am not sure how to post pictures on this thread but I did add a picture to my blog if you want to see my darling little loaf!

Thanks MaryJane and everyone here for your support!

Christina
Farmgirl Sister #195
City Chick & Friends Chapter Mama
http://justacitychick.blogspot.com/


Reply author: Calicogirl
Replied on: Mar 25 2009 1:46:39 PM
Message:

Christina,

Your loaf looks great!

~Sharon

By His Grace, For His Glory


Reply author: candela59
Replied on: Mar 25 2009 2:31:02 PM
Message:

Christina~ great looking bread. Much better than my hockey puck! I'm not giving up though. I'll be baking again on Sunday.

Peggy :)

www.thewanderlustgirl.blogspot.com

"Happiness is not having what you want, it is wanting what you have."


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 25 2009 3:20:25 PM
Message:

As mentioned earlier this week, my mother had gotten extra extra sour. When you walked into my house all you could smell was sourdough! I added 1/2 teaspoon of baking soda to my mother and fed her for a couple days. Today I used the Farmhouse bread recipe and added to it 1 teaspoon of baking soda. My loaf came out wonderful. It has that touch of sour that is great for sandwiches, but isn't over powering. So, this session was a success.

So to answer the question about about baking soda, it is going to be an individual trial and error to find out how much you need. You'll have to match up how sour your mother is and your personal taste in bread. I'd say start sparingly.

http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 25 2009 3:31:25 PM
Message:

I saw this little tidbit out on the internet and wanted to bounce it around the group.

The person baking the artisan no-knead bread placed their loaf on the baking stone in the heated oven, then placed over top of the loaf a large disposable lasgna pan making a tent of sorts (they said you could use an oven safe bowl too). It stated that the "cover" should not touch the loaf and allow sufficient room for any rise in the bread. The logic was to have a softer crust using the steam that the bread gives off while baking without messing around with ice cubes in the oven or bowls of water. Then the last few minutes of the bake they uncover it to brown it up if they desire.

Sounded sort of interesting to me. I'll give it a try the next time I make bread and report back. Would welcome hearing the thoughts of others too. We have a lot of experienced people here...so combined we are a force to be reckoned with!

http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 25 2009 3:33:18 PM
Message:

mimilou,

what type of blueberry bread are you looking for? A regular yeast bread with added blueberries or a quick bread that uses our sourdough & blueberries? Also a sweet bread or not?

http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: mimilou
Replied on: Mar 25 2009 3:51:37 PM
Message:

I'd like to incorporate the sourdough in some way with the blueberries. I've been baking with the sourdough for 5 weeks now and love the whole process and the end results. My daughter lives out of town and I'm hauling my mother out to bake for her. Thanks for any recipes.


Reply author: candela59
Replied on: Mar 25 2009 5:18:50 PM
Message:

Lisa~ I've been baking the artisan no knead breads for about 2 months now. Instead of using the pan over the top of the bread...I placed my bread in a casserole and covered it for the first 15 minutes of baking and then uncovered it. I got a wonderful result w/o having to use a stone or water. On the ABin5 website they talk about using Dutch ovens in this way also. I didn't have the Dutch oven but used the casserole dish instead. Great result. Hope that helps! :)

www.thewanderlustgirl.blogspot.com

"Happiness is not having what you want, it is wanting what you have."


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 25 2009 6:26:26 PM
Message:

Peggy,

Thanks for the reply. I don't have a stone yet either, but am considering it as a future addition for making pizza with the sourdough. All the loaves I've made have been either in glass baking dishes or these great oven safe stoneware bowls that I have. I have covered my loaf with foil for the last 1/2 of the bake and use the egg wash to help keep the crust a little softer. Yes, it IS artisan bread and the crust is supposed to be quite firm. Some of us have debated and traded ideas for a slightly softer crust here in the forum because we all have our own likes and dislikes. Just thought to throw out that tip that I saw in case anyone had tried it or wanted to try it. Thanks so much for sharing your tips with us!

http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 25 2009 6:35:17 PM
Message:

Julie,

In the dog biscuit recipe...i used 1/2 cup of oats and 1/2 cup of corn meal this time and the dough rolled out for cutting with cookie cutters much better...but the recipe is a definite keeper! My dogs enjoy having my home baked cookies so much more than the junk they sell in the stores. They store well too. The sourdough is agreeing with their digestive tracts better than my old recipe too, so we covered the old recipe card up with your new recipe. Thanks again!

http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 25 2009 7:00:24 PM
Message:

Wow! I was away for about a day and a half and you girls went crazy!
I too have had success with pampered chef stoneware pans. I dont have the loaf pan though I would like to get one.

Yes a hungry starter will rise quicker. You should wait at least 12 hours after your last feeding to mix up a recipe. However it is not recpommended to wait much more than 12 to 24 hours because this is when your starter will give off the alcohols(hooch) that add to the sourness. Unless you like yours REALLY sour than waiting 24 hours or more would be fine.

Lisa - my dog has an allergy to corn so I do not use cornmeal. In fact most dogs that have skin irritation problems are actually allergic to the corn products found in most dog food!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: mystree
Replied on: Mar 25 2009 8:09:27 PM
Message:

I had written earlier about my failure (pg. 74) with my first batch and a lot of people agreed that they had the trouble with their first batch also. Well, after letting my "mother" rest for a day, it had no bubble and grey sludge on it that smelled more like something dead and rotting than stout beer. So I've had to start my mother all over again. Wish me luck with the first batch of the new mother. Four more days to go.


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 25 2009 9:19:07 PM
Message:

Julie, luckily mine aren't allergic to the corn meal that I buy for baking. My one 10 year old basset has seasonal allergies due to some plant that we can't narrow down and we have a hard time from August to October with her. Her new doctors are much more proactive and last year went better. My 1 year old male basset has had an immature digestive tract and is prone to diarrhea. The vet has had me being careful with the type of food he gets and he gets plain organic yogurt with active cultures and that has helped so much. Hence why I started to bake my own treats in an effort to keep inferior quality food, preservatives, etc. out of their snacks.


Barbara, sorry to hear of your problems. Hope that this next batch goes better!

http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: urban farm girl
Replied on: Mar 26 2009 07:13:48 AM
Message:

Well I did the brownies..good...yesterday I made a stromboli with the pizza dough filled with broccoli,cheese,salami and some marinara sauce very good. Next I want to try the olive garlic bread. This whole thing is way too cool!!! Have a good day girls!!!!


Reply author: Farmers Daughter
Replied on: Mar 26 2009 08:18:39 AM
Message:

Lisa~ I wonder too if the cover over the top of the bread, for those who are having trouble with the free form loaves on a cookie sheet, if it would help give the bread something to rise up in and not spread out so much. The sides of the container would stop it from spreading flat and give it a reason to go up. Very interesting. Thanks for the idea.


Reply author: Sewsmartie
Replied on: Mar 26 2009 09:22:51 AM
Message:

Sorry, gals, but this diehard Mom is giving up on her "mother"! After 4 weeks and 3 unsucessful bakings I am going back to yeast. All is not in vain, however, I discovered KA Flour and that was worth it!

Martie

Sewsmartie


Reply author: Quintessential Kate
Replied on: Mar 26 2009 4:08:38 PM
Message:

Martie,
Sorry you have had such a hard time with your "mother" and breadmaking. I think with the shift in weather......it becoming warmer, you will find your start is going to go crazy.
You know, you can still use your sourdough start with yeast and make some awesome loaves.
Anyway Martie.....again, sorry for your time and effort not coming to fruition.
Ciao, Kath

Heart of Texas
Chapter
AKA: Hot Farmgirl #234
http://quintessentialkate.blogspot.com

Today is my best day!


Reply author: urban farm girl
Replied on: Mar 26 2009 4:52:47 PM
Message:

Martie I tried and tried with no luck about four times. I made a new starter and then I tried the honey wheat oatmeal bread and finally I had some success....I like the fact now I make all different recipes with the starter... I'm hooked on this.


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 26 2009 5:17:05 PM
Message:

Martie, sorry this didn't work out for you. There are tons of different sourdough starter recipes to try so I hope you'll try again when you are ready. There are also places that you can buy a starter (King Arthur among them) or you can try to find someone that has some starter to share in your area (friends, freecycle groups, church groups, or try an ad in a local free paper are places to start).

http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 26 2009 5:24:01 PM
Message:

Sourdough Blueberry Muffins (from Sourdough Home)

This recipe, like most muffins, is a quickbread recipe. It rises due to the interaction of the sourdough starter's acid and the baking soda. As a result no rise time is required. Just mix and pop in the oven. As with any muffin, take care to not overmix the batter.

These muffins are not very sweet. If you prefer a sweeter muffin, increase the sugar to 1/2 cup, Some diabetics use fructose as the sweetner instead of sugar. I use regular size muffin pans (about 2 inch size) and fill the cups to the top to make good size muffins. Let them cool a few minutes in the pans for easier removal.

If you fill the cups only 2/3 full, this will probably make 8 muffins.

Ingredients

1 egg
1 tsp vanilla
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 cup oil
1 cup sourdough starter
1 cup whole wheat flour
1 tsp baking soda
1/4 cup sugar or fructose
1/2 cup blueberries

Method

Preheat oven to 425F.

Combine dry ingredients in small bowl. Stir in blueberries. Combine wet ingredients in medium bowl. Add dry ingredients to wet ones.

Mix quickly and spoon into 6 muffin cups (spray cups with Baker's Joy).

Bake at 425 for about 20 minutes.


http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 26 2009 5:25:35 PM
Message:

Blueberry Sourdough Breakfast Bread Recipe (from Cooking Cache)

1 cup sourdough starter
1/4 cup shortening -- softened
3/4 cup sugar
1 egg
1/2 cup milk
1 cup unbleached white flour
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cup blueberries

-- TOPPING:

1/3 cup brown sugar
1/3 cup flour
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 cup butter -- softened

1. Bring the starter to room tempterature in a large bowl. In another bowl, cream the shortening and sugar together and then beat in the egg and milk. Turn this mixture into the bowl with the sourdough starter and sift in the flour, salt and baking soda. Mix very well. Gently fold in the blueberries. If they are canned be sure to drain them thoroughly before using.

2. Pour the batter into a well greased 8-inch square pan and allow to stand in a warm place for at least 20 minutes. Meanwhile, prepare the topping.

FOR TOPPING:

Stir topping ingredients together with a fork until the mixture is crumbly. Sprinkle the topping over the bread batter just before baking in a preheated 375°F oven for 45 to 50 minutes. Do not underbake as this is a moist bread. It will pull away from the sides of the pan when done, although some of the sugar topping may cling to the sides.

http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 26 2009 6:05:04 PM
Message:

Chocolate Bread (Jason Horn)

• Combine 1/4 cup water, 1/4 cup flour, and about 2 tablespoons starter. Cover and let sit 8-12 hours (I do this Monday night before I go to bed).
• Add 1/2 cup flour and 1/2 cup water. Cover and let sit 8-12 hours more (I do this Tuesday morning before work).
• Add 2 cups water, about 1 tablespoon kosher salt, 1/4 cup sugar, and 4-6 ounces melted chocolate (try to get it half melted, so there's some liquid and some chunks). Stir in flour with electric mixer until dough is no longer sticky, 4 to 8 cups, depending on humidity and other ingredients. (I do this around 10 pm Tuesday night).
• Let dough rest 1-2 hours, then split in half. Form each half into a loaf and let rise overnight in a cold oven.
• Turn oven to 425° F, and bake 40-45 minutes.


http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 26 2009 6:06:58 PM
Message:

Title: Sourdough Rolled Chocolate Cookies
Categories: Cookies
Yield: 1 servings

2 c Flour
1/2 c Sourdough starter
1/2 ts Salt
1/2 c Shortening
3/4 c Sugar
1 Egg
2 tb Rum
1 ts Vanilla
2 oz Unsweetened chocolate
Melted and cooled
1 c Uncooked quick oatmeal

Recipe by: Martha Sparks
Sift together the flour and salt in a bowl. Add the softened
shortening, sugar, egg, rum vanilla and sourdough. Add the melted
chocolate. Beat until smooth. Add the oats, beat well. Chill for about 1
hour in refrigerator. Roll on lightly floured board to 1/8 inch thick. Cut
with cookie cutter. Place on ungreased cookie sheet. Bake in preheated over
350 for 10 to 12 minutes.



http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 26 2009 6:09:35 PM
Message:

Shelburne Sourdough Chocolate Waffles

First Day:

1 cup unsalted butter

2 cups whole or 2% milk

4 Tablespoons Brown Sugar, packed

2 cups White Starter

2 teaspoons salt

3 cups all purpose flour

½ cup Dutch process cocoa



Second Day:

4 large eggs

½ teaspoon baking soda

¼ cup buttermilk

Vegetable oil

First Day

On the evening before you serve the waffles, prepare the initial waffle batter:

Place butter, milk and brown sugar in a saucepan over low heat and stir until butter melts. Set aside to cool to room temperature.

Add White Starter to the above cooled mixture. Sift remaining ingredients, flour, salt and cocoa. Whisk dry ingredients into starter mixture until blended, being careful not to over mix. Cover the bowl tightly with plastic wrap and let the batter stand at room temperature for 8 to 14 hours



Second Day

Preheat the waffle iron 20 minutes before you will be ready to make your waffles. Uncover the batter and whisk the eggs and baking soda in until well combined. The batter should be quite thick and elastic. Add buttermilk to thin batter a little bit. Lightly brush the hot waffle iron with a little vegetable oil. Pour ¾ cup of batter onto the hot waffle iron. Close the lid and let the waffle cook until it is crisp, yet done on the inside, about 5 minutes. Repeat for each waffle.



http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 26 2009 6:11:57 PM
Message:

Sourdough Hot Cross Buns
1/2 tablespoon active dry yeast
1/4 cup warm water (105-115 degrees)
1 1/2- 2 cups flour
1/4 cup warm milk (105-115 degrees)
1 cup sourdough starter (see link)
2 tablespoons sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/3 cup chopped red and green candied cherries
1/4 cup golden raisins
Confectioners' Icing

1. Dissolve yeast in warm water. Set aside for 5 minutes. Combine 1 cup flour, milk, sourdough starter, sugar, salt, butter, vanilla, and yeast mixture in mixing bowl.

2. Add cherries, raisins, and enough remaining flour to make a soft dough. Knead on lightly floured surface until smooth — about 10 minutes.

3. Place in greased bowl, turning to coat top. Cover; let rise in warm place until double — about 1 hour.

3. Punch down dough. Divide into 12 equal pieces. Shape into balls. Place on greased baking sheet.

5. Cover; let rise in warm place until double — about 30 minutes. Bake in a preheated oven (400°) for 15-20 minutes or until done.

6. Cool on wire rack. Make crosses on top of buns with Confectioners' Icing.

Recipe Source: Festive Bread Book



http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: candela59
Replied on: Mar 27 2009 06:04:04 AM
Message:

Good morning all!

I'm going to try Ronna's San Francisco Sourdough today. I'm setting aside some of "Mum" and then I'm going to feed her. I plan on baking Ronna's bread today and then baking again on Sunday. I've been giving her "double" feedings so that I would wind up with enough starter for at least 2 bakings a week.

This will be the second try with "Mum" and I'm thinking I'll be successful due to the yeast that's included in this recipe. Sunday I'll probably try the Farmhouse White Bread again. I'm praying for something other than a hockey puck!

I'll check in later and let you know how the SF Sourdough turned out!

www.thewanderlustgirl.blogspot.com

"Happiness is not having what you want, it is wanting what you have."


Reply author: Farmers Daughter
Replied on: Mar 27 2009 07:41:32 AM
Message:

Thanks for the Hot Cross buns recipe. I am going to give them a try.


Reply author: Ronna
Replied on: Mar 27 2009 5:38:30 PM
Message:

Note to new bakers: I posted that recipe (from Sunset Magazine) on page 13 when so many were getting bricks. It is not what MaryJane had in mind when she started this discussion. I thought some might be encouraged to keep trying if they were able to bake a good loaf and it's been helpful to many. Her methods, recipes and terminology are her own and may not necessarily coincide with info you will find on other websites or lists. I hope that many farmgirls will refer back to the beginning of this thread and MaryJanes Farm magazine for her Artisan Bread the MaryJane way. Because my experience and opinions aren't always the same as hers, I've tried to be helpful but not confuse new bakers. Take baby steps, don't rush to make bread and using common sense will result in successful bread baking.


Reply author: Farmers Daughter
Replied on: Mar 27 2009 11:04:01 PM
Message:

Ronna~ I appreciate your advice and the recipe. I used it twice (during my first weeks of starting my Mother) Never ended up with a brick. So I am very happy you shared. Now I am making bread with MJ original recipe. So your ideas did exactly what you intended them to do on my end. It kept me going and encouraged till my starter was ready to do it on it's own.
Thank you!


Reply author: Quintessential Kate
Replied on: Mar 28 2009 05:57:19 AM
Message:

Ronna,
I "ditto" what DiAnn said. I used your recipe twice while my starter was maturing, but now I am making my artisan bread every week without a hitch. You DID encourage me....and I thank you immensely.
Kate

Heart of Texas
Chapter
AKA: Hot Farmgirl #234
http://quintessentialkate.blogspot.com

Today is my best day!


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 28 2009 08:51:04 AM
Message:

Kind of to add to what ronna said - Maryjanes goal for this starter is to help us create a variety of sweet and savory breads that require little or no kneading. I have been trying to share with you a variety of recipes at varying levels of difficulty. I will share another one on Sunday night. I am so glad you are all getting into this. Our coments and posts will really help MaryJane out as she collects info on her bread idea. I would encourage you to try to stick to recipes, for the most part, that do not include added yeast. I would also discourage you from using recipes that include shortening. (all natural butter can usually be easily substituted measure for measure). The wonderful thing about BREADTHEMARYJANEWAY is it ease and versatility. Keep baking and keep sharing your recipes! Just keep SIMPLICITY in mind!! :)

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 28 2009 09:14:48 AM
Message:

Mary Jane has wonderful ideas and I am going to take a photo copy of the original article and have it laminated to keep in the kitchen to refer back to. Of course, I also enjoy reading what others have to say on the subject or sourdough. The opinions are many for sure, and it seems that you can make it as hard or simple as you want to make it. When something that sounds interesting or that confuses me comes up, I like to share it here on the list to get feedback from the group since there are so many of us. How can you pass up the advantage of having so many experienced and creative people all in one place! It is never an attempt to send the original MJ starter or breads off topic.

Just set to rise a loaf of Mary Jane's farmhouse bread with a few additions. I used the original recipe from the article and added 2 teaspoons tomato paste made from sun-dried tomatoes, 1/2 teaspoon roasted chopped garlic, and 1/4 teaspoon of dried chopped basil leaves. Instead of using a wooden spoon to mix the ingredients together, I used my hands to get the tomato paste blended throughout the loaf. Placed it into my medium sized oven-safe stoneware bowl for the rise. Will let you all know later how it turns out.

http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: Ronna
Replied on: Mar 28 2009 09:38:36 AM
Message:

Thanks Ladies! I might add that most any baking recipe you're using can have improved flavor by adding a 1/2 cup or more of starter. You don't need to revamp your whole recipe file. If the consistency is about the same as your starter, adjustments to flour or liquid should not be needed. Our grand and great grandmothers didn't have measuring cups-butter the size of an egg, a teacup full of flour-you can be sure it varied from one to another and they did just fine. Make this fun, not a chore.


Reply author: candela59
Replied on: Mar 28 2009 2:38:33 PM
Message:

I made Ronna's SF Sourdough yesterday simply because my first week I did get the proverbal hockey puck. I had been double feeding Mum all week so that I could bake several times without depleteing her. Ronna~ the bread was great, as was the feeling of satisfaction with a successful bake! This morning I made an Amish style coffee cake using 2 cups of Mum and DH and I enjoyed the most wonderful breakfast ever. To show the versitility of MJ's starter this recipe called for the sweeter starter commonly called Herman. Well, I just decided to use Mum instead with wonderful results. I still have enough left to try MJ's basic white
Farmhouse loaf tomorrow. I can't wait to try it because my starter is so creamy, bubbly and wonderful smelling right now. I'll let everyone know how it turns out. I just love coming here for all of the ideas and encouragement.

www.thewanderlustgirl.blogspot.com

"Happiness is not having what you want, it is wanting what you have."


Reply author: willowtreecreek
Replied on: Mar 28 2009 5:34:31 PM
Message:

Guess what girls....I HATE to admit it but I had to send my 12 week old mother to the grave today. Last week was a very hectic week and i neglected my starter a bit and on Sunday I noticed a little "fuzz" on the edge of the bowl. It had also been a VERY warm and humid week The starter itself still looked fine so I used a ladel and scooped it all into a new bowl and continued feeding. Tuesday I noticed a slightly reddish tint to the surface of the starter but when stirred she looked perfect. By Friday the red tint turned into a red skin which I pulled off. Well today she was still very red and was forming fuzz on the edge again. In my research I have read that anytime it develops a red or blue tint it should be discarded. So I did. I told you all I'm no super hero!!!!!

Anyway I started anew with some dried starter I had prepareed several weeks ago. I am documenting with pictures and will be able to let you know how it all went in about a week or so. As I see it it is a learning experience I can share with all of you!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 28 2009 6:07:36 PM
Message:

Julie, so sorry that you had to dump! However, it just isn't worth getting sick over. Do keep us informed on the drying/restarting process as it would be good to know how to do that.

Peggy, congrats on your good day! It is always so nice to feel a success.

http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99


Reply author: lupinelady99
Replied on: Mar 28 2009 6:15:26 PM
Message:

[URL=http://s527.photobucket.com/albums/cc351/lupinelady99/?action=view¤t=100_1100.jpg][/URL]

Well, I think that this loaf of bread was my best by far. Earlier I posted about placing a bowl or lasagna pan over your loaf to trap the steam while baking for a softer crust. It works! My crust is still nice and crunchy but not so dangero