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Author Merit Badge Awardees - Woo-hoo Sisters!:  Farmgirl Sisterhood Merit Badge Awardees 
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

15500 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
15500 Posts

Posted - Dec 29 2021 :  1:05:13 PM  Show Profile
Cindy Kinion (AussieChick, #6058) has received a certificate of achievement in Each Other for earning an Intermediate Level Farmgirl Grammar Merit Badge!

“I had some trouble finding the book Woe Is I: The Grammarphobe's Guide to Better English In Plain English, but I was able to borrow Eats, Shoots and Leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation from the library, so I read this one instead. I liked that Lynne Truss adds an element of humour to her book. It makes reading about punctuation enjoyable.

I have contributed 10 posts to the Farmgirl Chatroom in the past 4 days. I have endeavoured to use correct grammar and spelling in each post. I have also continued to discover and use new words since achieving my beginner badge in July. Here are some of the new words that I have discovered:
* Biblioklept:- one who steals books;
* Benthos:- the flora and fauna on the bottom of a sea or lake;
* Absquatulate:- to leave somewhere abruptly;
* Noctambulist:- a sleepwalker;
* Resplendent:- shining brilliantly; gleaming; splendid;
* Tintinnabulation:- the ringing or sound of bells;
* Umbriferous:- casting or making shadows;
* Blatherskite:- a person who talks at great length without making much sense;
* Deipnophobia:- a morbid fear of dinner parties;
* Finifugal:- afraid of finishing anything;
* Macrosmatic:- having a good sense of smell;
* Nudiustertian:- the day before yesterday;
* Pauciloquent:- uttering few words; brief in speech;
* Ratoon:- a small shoot growing from a root of a plant.”

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

15500 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
15500 Posts

Posted - Dec 29 2021 :  1:07:11 PM  Show Profile
Cindy Kinion (AussieChick, #6058) has received a certificate of achievement in Outpost for earning an Expert Level Speak for the Trees Merit Badge!

“We are fortunate to live close to Ravensbourne National Park which is situated on a spur of the Great Dividing Range between Toowoomba and Esk. It has short walks and spectacular views from Gus Beutel’s Lookout.

Local Aboriginal people and those traveling west to the bunya nut feasts in the mountains used the area extensively. You can still see places where they dug for yams. Red cedar Toona australis and other timbers were felled from about the 1860s. Cleared land was used for dairying and beef cattle grazing. The park was declared in 1922 and now covers 440 ha.

Piccabeen palms, ferns, elkhorns, and fungi thrive in the cool, moist remnants of rainforest and wet eucalypt forest along the edge of the Great Dividing Range. Evidence suggests the rainforest is slowly overtaking the open forest. Gullies with trickling streams are moist and inviting, while exposed ridges are warm and dry.

Along the Rainforest Circuit, large Sydney blue gums Eucalyptus saligna emerge through the rainforest canopy. In the understorey there are many attractive ferns, tree ferns and vines.
The Palm Creek Circuit track leaves the rainforest circuit and crosses Palm Creek - named after the piccabeen palms Archontophoenix cunningnamiana covering its steep banks. Up in the canopy you can see epiphytes, including staghorns and orchids.

Red soils of the park's west and south-west support rainforest through which eucalypts emerge, including Sydney blue gum Eucalyptus saligna, pink bloodwood Corymbia intermedia, and flooded gum E. grandis.

Plant life in the rainforest varies from palm groves and vines to an abundance of ferns, including stag horns and elkhorns. The canopy layer is often very dense and creates a cool, dark, and moist atmosphere below. These conditions contrast with eucalypt forest found elsewhere in the park. Sandy soils of the park's eastern section support open eucalypt forest dominated by Blackbutt E. pilularis and Queensland Blue Gum E. tereticornis. Other eucalypts, she-oaks and wattles also occur.

My husband and I regularly take these short walks. Fortunately, there is not very much rubbish in the park as visitors are encouraged to take their trash with them, but we took a garbage bag along, nevertheless, and picked up a few pieces of trash left near the picnic tables at the day use area.”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

15500 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
15500 Posts

Posted - Dec 29 2021 :  1:08:04 PM  Show Profile
Cindy Kinion (AussieChick, #6058) has received a certificate of achievement in Farm Kitchen for earning an Expert Level Recipes Merit Badge!

“This year, I encouraged my Mum and my sister to use Grandma's recipes for our shared Christmas lunch. There were 10 people at our lunch and the recipes were a hit!

Mum usually does the baked ham, so she used Grandma's Marmalade & Mustard Glazed Ham recipe. Mum also made Grandma's Cauliflower with White Sauce. My sister made Grandma's recipes for Potato & Onion Bake and a Roasted Pumpkin Salad. I was on dessert duty, so instead of our traditional desserts, I chose to make Grandma's Orange & Almond Cake (served with vanilla ice-cream) and her Papaya, Mango, Banana and Mint Fruit Salad recipes. I had also made Grandma's Rocky Road and Vanilla Fudge in the lead up to Christmas, so we had some of those leftover too.

So, Christmas lunch this year was dedicated to Grandma and her love of recipes.”

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

15500 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
15500 Posts

Posted - Jan 03 2022 :  3:13:48 PM  Show Profile
Candy Hogan (Tigger9777, #8283) has received a certificate of achievement in Stitching & Crafting for earning an Expert Level Homespun Christmas Merit Badge!

“I decorated my tree with 100% handmade ornaments. I made the snowflake star on top in turquoise-blue to match our Brentwood farm girl chapter T-shirt colors. I made the gingham blue check bow because that's what my farm girl apron is made out of. I made deer pom pom ornaments and a wooden deer ornament because in our area there's a lot of hunting, fishing, and agricultural farmland. I made my own pom pom garland and I put red check buffalo print fabric at the bottom just because it looks Country. I delivered my tree to the Westmont Senior Assisted Living Center in Brentwood, California.”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

15500 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
15500 Posts

Posted - Jan 03 2022 :  3:16:05 PM  Show Profile
Candy Hogan (Tigger9777, #8283) has received a certificate of achievement in Stitching & Crafting for earning an Expert Level Scrapbooking Merit Badge!

“I went to the library and looked up a fine art encyclopedia book. I prefer the colors of blues and greens, so I like Vincent van Gogh's Starry Night. I read the book Organizing and Preserving Your Heirloom Documents.

When planning my scrapbooking pages, I would have liked to use more blue and green, but because it was my granddaughter's 1st middle school drama play and she had two parts, the title was "The Thirty-Three Little Pigs", so I needed to go with more pinks in this scrapbook. I am also working on another scrapbook to document the whole year of our Brentwood farm girl chapter, but for this badge I wanted to do my granddaughter's 1st drama play. I have past experience with scrapbooking, so it was nice to already have paper and stickers in the house.”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

15500 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
15500 Posts

Posted - Jan 03 2022 :  3:17:39 PM  Show Profile
Candy Hogan (Tigger9777, #8283) has received a certificate of achievement in Each Other for earning an Intermediate Level Bibliophile Badging Merit Badge!

“I challenged my fellow Brentwood Farm Girls to a reading contest. I'm hosting a zoom meeting on January 14th, 2022 to share what books we have read. I will have prizes for the winners. I searched out the Farmgirl Book Club on Facebook and have applied to join the group. I still have a bunch of books at home I want to read for fun.”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

15500 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
15500 Posts

Posted - Jan 03 2022 :  3:19:07 PM  Show Profile
Candy Hogan (Tigger9777, #8283) has received a certificate of achievement in Each Other for earning a Beginner Level Blogging Merit Badge!

“I read the book Blogging for Creatives. I think the hardest thing for me is going to be setting up the blogging platform. Right now, the three topics I'm considering are genealogy, crafts, or how to work with MaryJane's Farmgirl Sisterhood Merit Badge program since I've done over 275 badges. This will be a challenge for me because I don't like to do web technology.”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

15500 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
15500 Posts

Posted - Jan 03 2022 :  3:20:34 PM  Show Profile
Candy Hogan (Tigger9777, #8283) has received a certificate of achievement in Each Other for earning a Beginner Level Civic Heritage Merit Badge!

“I chose to visit a museum that I live really close to in our agricultural town. It's called the East Contra Costa Museum. The museum sits on 1.3 acres and it showcases farm equipment, hand tools, an antique fire truck, antique tractors, and carriages. It also has the 1st schoolhouse called Eden Plain School, built in 1868. The main house was originally owned by the Byer family and then purchased by the Nail family. Originally, it was a boarding house, and then a personal residence for the Nail family who donated it to the city in 1984 and the museum opened to the public in 1986. The main house has displays of antique furniture, artifacts, photos, and local history.”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

15500 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
15500 Posts

Posted - Jan 03 2022 :  3:22:32 PM  Show Profile
Candy Hogan (Tigger9777, #8283) has received a certificate of achievement in Each Other for earning an Expert Level Farmgirl Grammar Merit Badge!

“I wrote a letter to the editor of the Brentwood Press, discussing the importance of communication and syntax. I read the book Eats, Shoots and Leaves: The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation by Lynn Truss. I wrote down my new words daily for 14 days.”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

15500 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
15500 Posts

Posted - Jan 03 2022 :  3:23:43 PM  Show Profile
Candy Hogan (Tigger9777, #8283) has received a certificate of achievement in Cleaning Up for earning a Beginner Level Living Zero Waste Merit Badge!

“This was fun and super easy to get started..
I completed the Path to Zero Waste merit badge on 2/15/21. The 5 R's of zero waste are: Refuse, Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, and Rot.
Some different ways that you can practice each of the 5 R's would be:
1. Refuse what you do not NEED, say no to single use items.
2. Reduce what you do need, cut back back, donate, sell, declutter.
3. Reuse by purchasing reusable containers, jars, washible dish cloths versus buying paper towels.
4. Recycle is the last step to do after 1 - 3 are done. You would recycle what is left over.
5. Rot = composting your organic waste material.”

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

15500 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
15500 Posts

Posted - Jan 03 2022 :  3:27:28 PM  Show Profile
Candy Hogan (Tigger9777, #8283) has received a certificate of achievement in Outpost for earning a Beginner Level Orienteering Merit Badge!

“This is going to be an easy badge for me to complete because I have been in boy scouting for 28 years. I've been to orienteering events in the past, including night courses which are a blast.

I reviewed the website OrienteeringUSA.org. Some of the basics I learned from the website are that orienteering is a sport of navigation. You will learn map reading skills and topography maps and how to read terrain. Events can be timed, using course maps which come in five standard colors using symbols. Variations on events are: foot courses, trail, ski, bike and radio courses.

Some of the standard course types are point to point and score courses in which you have to hit certain controls within a time limit. Relay team courses and night courses where you use headlamps and reflective markers.

Some of the gear needed to participate in orienteering would be a compass, whistle, good shoes, comfortable clothes, watch, cell phone, pen, and an electronic punch finger-stick or needle punch for your course check points. This was fun.”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

15500 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
15500 Posts

Posted - Jan 03 2022 :  3:32:22 PM  Show Profile
Candy Hogan (Tigger9777, #8283) has received a certificate of achievement in Farm Kitchen for earning a Beginner Level MaryJane's Better Butter Merit Badge!

“This is an easy badge for me to complete because I teach a butter project in our local 4-H club. The sanitary practices you need to consider when handling butter and cream are that keeping it cold is key. Purchase those products last when you're out shopping. Look for container leaks and check the sell by dates.

The shelf life for cream is 1–5 days from the sell by date and always use it fresh, store cream should be in the refrigerator, in the original container, do not leave it at room temp.

The shelf life for butter is two weeks being kept in the refrigerator or you can freeze it for 6–9 months. Butter needs to be protected from heat, light, and air to avoid rancidity. Keep it in tight containers and refrigerate to avoid absorbing odors.

Some fun facts I learned when looking up the history of butter is in Ireland, barrels of butter are buried in the bogs. Butter is a good source of vitamins A,E,D, and K. The color of butter can depend on the cow's diet. Yellow dye is added for the traditional color we are used to getting butter in the stores. India produces the most butter.

There are four different ways you can make your own butter. The hand-shaken method, using a food processor, using a kitchen-aid stand mixer or a traditional butter churner.”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

15500 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
15500 Posts

Posted - Jan 03 2022 :  3:34:48 PM  Show Profile
Candy Hogan (Tigger9777, #8283) has received a certificate of achievement in Farm Kitchen for earning an Intermediate Level MaryJane's Better Butter Merit Badge!

“Buttermilk is the byproduct of making butter. Buttermilk has enzymes, which can help to cleanse and nourish the skin as a face wash. Buttermilk has lactic acid which helps with discoloration spots, blemishes and can lighten age spots. For your hair, it can fight dandruff and dryness. It has proteins to nourish and help replace essential nutrients.

You can also use buttermilk in cooking and baking. You can make things like pancakes, waffles, corn bread, fried chicken, coleslaw, buttermilk dressing, buttermilk biscuits, muffins, and rolls.
Washing and kneading butter is important.

Washing butter cleans the remaining buttermilk out of the butter to help preserve the butter. Kneading butter lets the butter take on flavor through oxidation and softens the texture. You'll know when it is done being washed because the water starts out cloudy and then turns clear. After washing, then you can salt your butter.

Sweet butter cream is the butter's main ingredient made from pasteurized fresh cream. Cultured butter is made like regular butter but then you add a bacterial culture to ferment the butter. After fermentation the cream is churned into butter.

I made a batch of butter from whole cream using my kitchen-aid stand mixer. I put the butter into silicone butter molds and I made scoops of butter pats to freeze. I put the rest in a container in the refrigerator. This was fun.”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

15500 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
15500 Posts

Posted - Jan 03 2022 :  3:36:28 PM  Show Profile
Candy Hogan (Tigger9777, #8283) has received a certificate of achievement in Farm Kitchen for earning an Expert Level MaryJane's Better Butter Merit Badge!

“I made my butter and then I made 2 compound recipes. The 1st one was an herb butter with thyme, rosemary and oregano. The 2nd compound was garlic and parsley. I made chocolate chip cookies with the homemade butter, and I added my homemade butter to gravy for my roast beef dinner tonight. I have shared on the Farmgirl Connection chat room.”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

15500 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
15500 Posts

Posted - Jan 03 2022 :  3:40:46 PM  Show Profile
Candy Hogan (Tigger9777, #8283) has received a certificate of achievement in Garden Gate for earning a Beginner Level Permaculture Merit Badge!

“Permaculture, by definition, is the development of agricultural ecosystems intended to be sustainable and self sufficient. Permaculture is a philosophy for a sustainable, holistic lifestyle. They combined the word permanent and agriculture to create permaculture as a system of ecological farming.

Permaculture is the notion of a optimized closed loop system. Everything is recycled, waste is eliminated by design and transformed in resources. Processes are clear and energy-saving, designed for little maintenance. Permaculture gardening is the best for anyone who wants to grow their own food in a sustainable system. Some benefits include: reduced cost, less waste, chemical resistance, less pollution, promotes green living, and self reliance.

Common methods:
Lasagna gardening, also known as the sheet mulch method, is a way to use a system of accelerated succession to create a healthy topsoil using cardboard, newspaper, or other organic base material to smother weeds or undergrowth. These will break down to compost eventually.

Hügelkultur is a system where you bury wood to make mounds and plant on top of the mounds. The wood will compost down. They are raised garden beds and can eliminate irrigation needs. It improves soil by adding nutrients, improves water holding capacity, creates a no-till, low effort raised bed.

Rotational grazing is dividing areas into cells called paddocks. You rotate livestock into different areas which will spread fertilizer evenly and graze down forage.”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

15500 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
15500 Posts

Posted - Jan 03 2022 :  3:43:00 PM  Show Profile
Candy Hogan (Tigger9777, #8283) has received a certificate of achievement in Garden Gate for earning an Intermediate Level Permaculture Merit Badge!

“A permaculture guild is a grouping of plants, trees, animals, insects and other components that work together to help ensure their health and productivity. It's important to increase and diversify our yield while reducing labor, time, and cost output.

I can apply these techniques in my spring garden and continue to practice rotational grazing with my livestock.

My map plan includes 5 areas of grazing and one large garden. I have been doing rotational grazing for 14 years. It works well. I check fence lines 2 times per season; we separate by species and gender. What I have learned, is by doing rotational grazing, it keeps the weeds down, it improves my soil nutrients with the animal fertilizer, it cuts down on my hay costs and there's less environmental impact to rotate areas versus keeping the animals in one area too long and depleting resources.”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

15500 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
15500 Posts

Posted - Jan 03 2022 :  4:24:07 PM  Show Profile
Amy Gendreau (#8369) has received a certificate of achievement in Garden Gate for earning a Beginner Level What's Your Beef? Merit Badge!

“I researched the websites at eatwild.com and maryjanesfarm.org/ieatmeat.asp to understand the difference between grass-fed beef and grain fed beef. I learned about how the cattle is cared for in various ranches vs corporate raising of cattle.

I have learned that the care of the cattle does matter in not only the quality of meat, but also for the animal itself. There are humane ways to raise animals that still give us meat to eat. Some of the problem is cost, and when people are living paycheck to paycheck, it's difficult to pass up low-cost, low-quality beef, but I have learned it is better to consume less meat and buy the ranch-owned beef than get a good deal on corporate raised beef.”

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

15500 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
15500 Posts

Posted - Jan 03 2022 :  4:25:05 PM  Show Profile
Amy Gendreau (#8369) has received a certificate of achievement in Garden Gate for earning an Intermediate Level What's Your Beef? Merit Badge!

“I read the book BEEF: The untold Story of How Milk, Meat, and Muscle Shaped the World, by Andrew Rimas and Evan D.G. Fraser. I found it at my local library. I also contacted Silva Family Ranch (https://www.silvafamilyranch.com/), a local ranch to my area and had a nice email conversation over the course of a month.

Though this wasn’t the easiest book to get through, it was filled with a lot of valuable information about where cattle came from and various myths, legends and cultures that are centered around cattle. The book explained the various cuts of beef and how they are best eaten. Short Loin is where porterhouse and filet mignon come from and is best eaten rare or medium. Prime Rib, almost as tender as the loin, should only be lightly seasoned, if at all. Sirloin, of the more affordable cuts, is best when seasoned and sauced, cooked medium or rare. Chuck is best for stews. Brisket requires tricks like smoke and brine to get through the cartilage and toughness. Plate, belly meat such as skirt steak, must be marinated to bring out flavor or flank, which must be soaked in wine, fruit juice or soy sauce and is best used in stir fries. Round must be beaten into submission to bring out flavor and then either braised or battered. Shank has the highest ambition of becoming ground beef or hamburger. (Rimas & Fraser, 2008)

My favorite part was the section on Japanese Wagyu beef and why it is the best to buy. The Japanese are not beef eaters and there was a ban on eating animals such as the cow. When Emperor Meiji lifted that ban, it did not open the gates for gorging on pound after pound of flesh. Instead, the Japanese carefully bred their cattle to have the best melt in your mouth flavor that is meant as a garnish or accent to a dish. It is made to eat in small portions and to not be cooked fully to be able to enjoy the fullness of flavor it provides. There are many varieties of the Wagyu beef, Kobe being the most well-known, and the cost can get as high as $300 per pound. It is only because the Japanese eat this meat in such small portions that Americans are able to enjoy this meat, especially in areas like Beverly Hills. They sell to Japanese first and then the extra meat is sold overseas to those willing to pay the price.

My correspondence with Silva Ranch taught me similar information to what I learned in researching the websites for the beginner badge.

When people don’t make very much money, they can’t afford the cost of properly cared for meat, that is why the school lunches use the meat that has not been raised or slaughtered in the best environment or even in a good environment. It is a vicious cycle. To take care of the animals, we need to take care of the people but to take care of the people, we need to take care of the animals.

That said, it's important to know these things and to find ways to purchase or use the meat that has been raised humanely and maybe use less meat to counter the higher cost of buying quality meat. I have also learned some resources when it comes to purchasing a half cow for the year instead of buying by the pound at the grocery store. It is important to know where our meat is coming from and how it is cared for. They also do pigs.”

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

15500 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
15500 Posts

Posted - Jan 03 2022 :  4:26:15 PM  Show Profile
Amy Gendreau (#8369) has received a certificate of achievement in Garden Gate for earning an Expert Level What's Your Beef? Merit Badge!

“Bought a steer from auction and raised him as feeder animal for my family. In October 2020, I purchased a steer from auction and cared for him on a farm until April 2021.

It was a learning experience to go from being a city kid to haltering, walking, giving shots, and cleaning up after a large animal. I learned how to control an animal larger than myself and become the one in charge. I made sure he had clean water, fresh hay, oats, and supplemented grain. I brushed him regularly, shampooed his coat, and gave him shots when he got sick. I learned how to follow guidelines on safe handling and proper dates before butchering.

The entire family was involved in cleaning up after him and changing the feed.

I was very proud of the fact that our steer saw me as the one in charge. He would charge at or challenge my husband, but would back off and listen to me. A lot of this knowledge and abilities were gained through my mentor, Candy, who let us use her land and trained us.

We used a recommended butcher and were able to get a year's worth of meat for my family, my parents, and my brother's family. It's the best meat we have ever had. The difference is noticeable in cooking and taste. I am now a believer in homegrown, or at least ranch purchased beef.”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

15500 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
15500 Posts

Posted - Jan 11 2022 :  07:13:04 AM  Show Profile
Rea Nakanishi (Lacey, #8284) has received a certificate of achievement in Stitching & Crafting for earning a Beginner Level Embroidery Merit Badge!

“For my beginning embroidery badge, I practiced the following stitches: Running, blanket, satin , outline, french knot, chain and loop. It took a while since I hadn't embroidered anything in the last 20 years!

The sampler turned out better that I had thought. It took a while with a few rip outs and redos, but I enjoyed it.”

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

15500 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
15500 Posts

Posted - Jan 11 2022 :  07:13:56 AM  Show Profile
Rea Nakanishi (Lacey, #8284) has received a certificate of achievement in Cleaning Up for earning a Beginner Level Path to Zero Waste Merit Badge!

“For the beginner Path to Zero Waste badge, I read the article on the website recycling.com.

I took a look at my recycling garbage can, regular garbage and green waste recycling can. From there I took notes on how I could improve my waste and recycling. This was not to hard to do. I live in a town where recycling is a proirty in the parks and schools in the area.”

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

15500 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
15500 Posts

Posted - Jan 11 2022 :  07:15:22 AM  Show Profile
Rea Nakanishi (Lacey, #8284) has received a certificate of achievement in Cleaning Up for earning an Intermediate Level Path to Zero Waste Merit Badge!

“By analyzing my three waste and recycling containers, I found that I use a lot of cardboard material.

Three things I noticed were I use a lot of take-out containers, cardboard from packaging, and plastic wrap. The thing that surprised me the most was how many cardboard boxes I can accumulate in a short amount of time.

This was more eye opening than I thought it would be especially with the holidays. But a good lesson to learn.”

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

15500 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
15500 Posts

Posted - Jan 11 2022 :  07:16:59 AM  Show Profile
Rea Nakanishi (Lacey, #8284) has received a certificate of achievement in Cleaning Up for earning an Expert Level Path to Zero Waste Merit Badge!

“I can be more earth friendly by cooking more at home to reduce plastic containers. I already recycle lawn clippings and food waste. But I could add more of my paper goods into my compost pile.

I have a compost pile that I use at my house and then take the compost (when broken down) to the community garden. I find that if you layer the waste materials such as leaves, grass clippings, with food waste at the bottom, there isn't a lot of odor.

It made me realize that I could do more to reduce my waste and recycle better, not just by bringing a cloth bag to the market, but in thinking about what I throw out.”

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

15500 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
15500 Posts

Posted - Jan 11 2022 :  07:19:43 AM  Show Profile
Rea Nakanishi (Lacey, #8284) has received a certificate of achievement in Cleaning Up for earning an Intermediate Level Green Energy Merit Badge!

“I tracked my electricity, natural gas, and gasoline for the month of December.

My electricity and gas bill was higher due to the cold weather. I know my 160 mile a week (640 miles per month) gasoline bill is always high. My vehicle only gets 15 miles to the gallon.

I did change all my lighting to LED. The shower heads and toilets are required to be low flow in my town. The new roof that was installed is now energy efficiant.

Looking at your expenses is always an interesting proposition. I wish I could lower my gasoline bill but it's a little impossible at this time—maybe a closer job in the future!”

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

15500 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
15500 Posts

Posted - Jan 11 2022 :  07:20:32 AM  Show Profile
Rea Nakanishi (Lacey, #8284) has received a certificate of achievement in Cleaning Up for earning an Intermediate Level Recycling Merit Badge!

“With so many food in plastic containers, I recycled the plastic. I also recycled the paper from the gifts and the vegetable and fruit waste to the compost pile.

This year, I used a lot of gift bags instead of alot of wrapping paper. The gift bags will be great to reuse next year!”

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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