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lupinelady99
True Blue Farmgirl

113 Posts

Lisa
Massena New York
USA
113 Posts

Posted - Mar 08 2009 :  4:49:20 PM  Show Profile  Send lupinelady99 an ICQ Message  Click to see lupinelady99's MSN Messenger address
Ok, slightly off topic here. My son wasn't as happy with the bread as I was. He admitted that it was not that the bread was bad, just that he had expected something closer to banana bread sweetness and texture. Once I reminded him that this was not quick bread he said he was going to try it toasted. Now I did some searching and found a banana bread recipe using the sourdough starter. What I am wondering is if you could substitute applesauce for bananas for an apple cinnamon loaf?

My other question is on crust. Now I like the extra crispy crunch, but don't know how some of my older relatives with dentures would fair with it. Was reading that if you put an egg wash on the bread that the crust wouldn't be quite as hard. Also saw a reference made to using white vinegar in a spray bottle (spritz once before baking and once part way through cooking) to have a slightly less tough crust. Does anyone know if this is true?

http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99
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Calicogirl
True Blue Farmgirl

5176 Posts

Sharon
Bruce Crossing Michigan
USA
5176 Posts

Posted - Mar 08 2009 :  5:11:45 PM  Show Profile
Julie,

My husband made breakfast yesterday morning.. Your Sourdough Pancakes, they were wonderful! It did make a large batch so we flash-froze them for another time. Thanks for the recipe :)

~Sharon

By His Grace, For His Glory
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urban farm girl
True Blue Farmgirl

80 Posts

Melissa
Posen IL
USA
80 Posts

Posted - Mar 08 2009 :  5:16:40 PM  Show Profile
Kathy that recipe really sounds good....how long did it take for your loaf to rise?
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ParisKnight
Farmgirl in Training

12 Posts

Kathy
Boston MA
12 Posts

Posted - Mar 08 2009 :  6:20:54 PM  Show Profile
Melissa

I use the bake in a pot method and it sat for a little over 7 hours yesterday before I baked. I was out in the PM or might have baked sooner but it probably takes at least 6 hours to rise up close to the edge of my 2qt pot. I cover the pot with its lid and leave it sitting on top of my oven. A few hours into the rise I turn on the oven and crank the heat up for a half hour or so. Not exactly energy efficient but it warms up the pot and seems to give the rise a boost.
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urban farm girl
True Blue Farmgirl

80 Posts

Melissa
Posen IL
USA
80 Posts

Posted - Mar 08 2009 :  6:56:42 PM  Show Profile
Alright that sounds good....I believe I will try that tomorrow.....I'll let you know how it goes..thanks Kathy!!
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willowtreecreek
True Blue Farmgirl

4813 Posts

Julie
Russell AR
USA
4813 Posts

Posted - Mar 08 2009 :  6:58:59 PM  Show Profile
Lisa Yes you can substitute applesauce. Use 1 cup applesauce for every 1cup of banana.

If you want a softer crust - rub the top with butter as soon as it comes out of the oven.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
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willowtreecreek
True Blue Farmgirl

4813 Posts

Julie
Russell AR
USA
4813 Posts

Posted - Mar 08 2009 :  7:00:49 PM  Show Profile
Lisa Yes you can substitute applesauce. Use 1 cup applesauce for every 1cup of banana.

If you want a softer crust - rub the top with butter as soon as it comes out of the oven.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
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Ronna
True Blue Farmgirl

1891 Posts

Ronna
Fernley NV
USA
1891 Posts

Posted - Mar 08 2009 :  8:14:00 PM  Show Profile
The nature of a sourdough bread is a thicker crisper crust. Yes, rubbing the top with butter when it is still hot from the oven will help soften it, but only to a certain extent. My MIL saved the wrappers from butter/margarine in the freezer and used them to grease pans and on bread out of the oven.
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Carrie W
Farmgirl Legend/Chapter Guru

411 Posts



411 Posts

Posted - Mar 09 2009 :  10:34:45 AM  Show Profile
My sourdough is producing better and better loaves! Definately aging helps with the rise and the softness of the dough. I'm also completely converted over to my MJF organic white flour now and have found that to be absolutely heavenly!!! I can even add wheat flour in the recipes for loaves and still get nice soft bread!

Hang in there, those of you with "young" mothers!

Carrie m

PS- got some crumbled feta from my cheese making neighbor and put it in a couple of loaves (about 1/2 cup each) and it was lovely!

www.totallykadeshfarm.blogspot.com

Farmgirl Sisterhood #147

Tis better to weep at joy than to joy at weeping--Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing
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lupinelady99
True Blue Farmgirl

113 Posts

Lisa
Massena New York
USA
113 Posts

Posted - Mar 09 2009 :  10:42:38 AM  Show Profile  Send lupinelady99 an ICQ Message  Click to see lupinelady99's MSN Messenger address
Thanks for all the replies. I'll play around and let you know how things turn out.

Today is day 9 for my "mother" and something sure kick started her overnight! Wow, got up this morning and found triple the number of bubbles and more of the distinctive sourdough smell than before. Going to try the extra feedings so I can share her with my best friend and do some baking this week.

http://www.myspace.com/lupinelady99
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willowtreecreek
True Blue Farmgirl

4813 Posts

Julie
Russell AR
USA
4813 Posts

Posted - Mar 09 2009 :  2:51:59 PM  Show Profile
Sourdough Croissants (Make 12 - 16)

This recipe has a lot of short steps but is delicious and is worth it to try even if you only make them once!
In a mixing bowl combine

1/2 cup starter
2 tablespoons sugar
1/2 cup warm water
3/4 cup flour

Let stand three hours or overnight, until expanded to about 2 cups.



The key to flakey croissants is to create lots of layers of butter and dough. Unfortunatly this isn’t a recipe where you can cut back on the butter!
Slice 2 sticks of cold butter into 10 – 12 slices. Place side-by-side on a sheet of waxed or parchment paper, forming a square. Dust with 1 tablespoon flour. Cover with another sheet of waxed or parchment paper and roll or press the butter between the papers until the slices are combined into a single slab of butter about 9" x 9". Chill the butter about 1 hour (or overnight as well) in the refrigerator.

Mix into the starter to form a soft dough:

3 tablespoons sugar (If you prefer a more savory croissant you will want to reduce this)
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup cold milk
1 cup flour

Knead a few times on a well-floured surface to incorporate the rest of the flour, adding up to 1/4 cup more flour as necessary. The dough will be VERY light and fluffy feeling. Cover and chill about 1/2 hour in the
refrigerator.

Remove the dough from the fridge and quickly roll out into a
rectangle about 15" x 10" (remember to flour the surface). Cut the cold butter in half and place one slab of butter across the center one-third of the dough. Fold one end of the dough over the butter, and then place the other half-slab of butter on it. Then fold the last third of the dough over
the butter, forming a package of dough-butter-dough-butter-dough,
about 10" x 5". (SEE PICTURES BELOW) Pinch the edges together so that there is no butter showing.

Quickly roll out this package of dough and butter into a rectangle
about 10" x 15". Fold it again into thirds, forming a package about
10" x 5" and chill in the refrigerator at least an hour.

After the dough has chilled one hour, remove from the fridge, roll it out, fold it, roll it and fold it again as you did above. Chill the new 10x5” package for another hour. (I know it seems like a lot but they are SO good and just think of all the calories you are burning while you make these! Almost makes up for all the butter!)

Line to large cookie sheets with parchment paper and spray or lightly brush with vegetable oil.

Roll out the dough into a rectangle about 10" x 15". Cut the dough
into six 5" x 5" squares, then cut each square diagonally forming
twelve triangles, 5" x 5" x 7". Flatten each triangle to about 1/8 thickness and then roll the dough starting with the wide end working towards the point as you would a crescent roll. Turn the ends in towards each other to form a half moon shape and place onto the baking sheets.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Bake the croissants 20-30 minutes,
then turn off the oven and open the door. They will be golden brown and flakey when they are done. Let them sit in the warm oven an additional 5-10 minutes to ensure they have cooked all the way through.

Be sure to use the upper most baking racks or the butter will melt out of them too fast while they cook. You may also want to switch the position of the two trays half-way through the baking time.




























Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com

Edited by - willowtreecreek on Mar 09 2009 2:59:52 PM
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mimilou
Farmgirl in Training

13 Posts

Mary Lou
Lancaster PA
USA
13 Posts

Posted - Mar 09 2009 :  3:08:59 PM  Show Profile
Julie,
You are amazing! Thanks for the information on increasing my mother. We are enjoying this sourdough experience so much. I bought my friend a copy of the magazine to encourage her to try it! I can't wait to move on from the bread to the carrot cake and the pizza. It's difficult each week chossing what to make. Thank you for creating and sharing the recipes.
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willowtreecreek
True Blue Farmgirl

4813 Posts

Julie
Russell AR
USA
4813 Posts

Posted - Mar 09 2009 :  3:29:45 PM  Show Profile
Thanks MaryLou! It is a good thing I teach cause teachers are always lurking around the lounge looking for free food! Everything is SO good but I would gain a ton of weight if I ate everything I have been baking! I have eaten like 4 of the croissants though! I'll just have to run an extra mile on the treadmill at the gym tomorrow.

And I have a loaf of pumpernickel bread rising right now! I'll post that after I bake it!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com

Edited by - willowtreecreek on Mar 09 2009 3:30:15 PM
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Quintessential Kate
True Blue Farmgirl

175 Posts

Kate
Tyler TX
USA
175 Posts

Posted - Mar 09 2009 :  4:55:10 PM  Show Profile
Don't know if this information is now moot......but here goes. I don't even remember who asked, but I put an egg wash on my last two loaves of Sourdough French and they had the most beautiful golden crust and they were soft...not crunchy and crumbly. I do love the crunchy crust but wanted to put sesame seeds on the loaves and needed the egg wash to make them stick. I was very happy with the results.

JULIE.......those croissants are BEAUTIFUL!!!! Can't wait to try them. Thanks for your dedication and experimentation.....and all the sage advice you give. And above all...your patience with us. I have sooooo enjoyed this fourm and look forward to many more recipes.

Ciao,
Kate

Heart of Texas
Chapter
AKA: Hot Farmgirl #234
http://quintessentialkate.blogspot.com

Today is my best day!
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12876 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12876 Posts

Posted - Mar 09 2009 :  6:43:07 PM  Show Profile
Hi farmgirls--brace yourselves, this is a tad long.

Now that you’ve seen what happens to an idea once it’s in the public domain, you can imagine the tremendous amount of R&D (research and development) that goes into a how-to book. You might think a book is just the words and the photos you see, but it’s so much more. It’s what goes on behind the scenes that makes a book a good book--some books better than others because of how much time went into the R&D part of it. I learned a good lesson with my first book when I graced its pages with an apron pattern that an employee handed me. She seemed so confident and I knew she was a good seamstress. Well, it had a major mistake and we’ve paid dearly by having to put a correction page into the first two printings of the book, not to mention the cringe factor--us cringing every time we get an email about it. So, now I run my patterns and recipes by three different people first. That takes a lot of time and money. As I begin work on my sourdough bread book, I make the recipes first and then I pass them on to others to make and give me feedback.

That said, my idea behind putting forth my “Bread the MaryJane Way” in my magazine first (before finalizing the idea into a book) was my way of launching the idea sooner rather than later because, well, I love to share what I’m passionate about! And I have to admit, I was also motivated by our current economy. I thought a concept so cheap, so simple, and so healthy couldn’t wait until I was completely DONE! (And I have to admit, my R&D efforts went almost entirely into coming up with easy measurements for you. I’ve baked sourdough exclusively for something like 30 years WITHOUT ever using a measuring cup--I just eyeball it.)

I also thought getting it onto this forum would in essence give me more than three testers! Your “feedback” has been invaluable as I continue to work on my bread book in my kitchen as well as in my head.

Here’s a glimpse into my world--a behind-the-scenes view:
More than 10 years ago, I bought a 3-story historic flour mill. It wasn’t one of my dreams to own a mill on the National Historic Register. But rather, it was one of those things that happen to you for a reason you’ll better understand at a later date. My dream at the time was to feed people organic food--falafel in particular. When my orders for falafel outgrew the volume I could produce on my hand grinder, I hooked up a lawn mower engine to my hand grinder and went my merry way. When my sales outgrew that approach, I ended up on the doorstep of a local third generation miller who took me under his wing. Joseph Barron not only let me use his large 100-year-old grinder for milling my garbanzo beans, he eventually sold me his historic mill in addition to hoping that my husband and I would continue on as flour millers. Believe me, we tried. We tried for several years. Hubby drove an old rusty 1961 Ford truck once a week to Joseph’s mill in Oakesdale, Washington (it’s an hour drive from our farm). I drove a 1965 Rambler station wagon. Once the back of my faux truck was full of flour for the drive home, the front wheels almost lifted off the ground! I would chug home late at night covered in flour dust. Not too slowly, because once I was pulled over by a police officer for going 35 through a small town with a posted 25 limit. When he saw my face covered in flour and found out what I was transporting, he let me off the hook. After all, we millers and farmers DO feed you.

We ground the very best organic grains in the world with Joseph teaching us all the tricks of the trade. But flour, even organic flour, is a tricky commodity. The price we’re used to paying per pound for flour as consumers has everything to do with massive volume, as in only a handful-of-mega-million-dollar-companies-left volume. (In Joseph’s day, most every county in the country had a local mill and resident miller.) We felt like Mike Mulligan (the kid’s book, Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel). We just couldn’t work fast enough. We couldn’t get past the color red on our books. Eventually, I came up with the idea to make our flour pay by creating value-added breads like my Garlic Fry Bread or my Focaccia Bread, and sure enough, that worked:

http://shopping.maryjanesfarm.org/s.nl/sc.2/category.13/.f#Breads

But selling flour didn’t. We just couldn’t get to that kind of volume with our equipment--and that, coupled with our collective “God-given-right-to-cheap-flour” mentality, (many people would comment, “Wow, the shipping costs are more than the flour”), we had to know when to stop…for the time being.
Joseph died in 2000 before he witnessed us turning off his big mill--we still use his smaller mill for garbanzo beans, corn, and a limited amount of wheat, etc. (Joe, I still have it in me to try flour again on your big mill, but with a bit more smarts this time.) To read more about this remarkable organic pioneer, go to:

http://www.maryjanesfarm.org/About/our-historic-flour-mill.asp

Four years ago, we poured a new concrete foundation at my farm for our someday on-site flour mill. It sits covered in snow today, but my desire to provide bakers with quality flour has been fired up again after reading about your problems with your starters. The white flour that I use for mine was a “find” that goes back to Joseph. His mill (one of the mills we have sitting in storage) ground whole wheat flour like none other, using a unique design that created a cult following for his signature whole wheat organic flour. Along the way, his bakers also wanted organic white flour. He struck a deal with a mill in Montana (one that is set up to take out the bran), and to this day, we’ve continued the tradition, trucking it here from Montana to use in our baking and bread mixes.

When I was getting ready to put my “Bread the MaryJane Way” concept into The Simply Bee Feb/March 2009 issue of my magazine, I quickly tried a bunch of different flours in my breads and then called the folks at King Arthur. I had used their flour for baking occasionally and knew their business was highly regarded. But first I asked my hubby if there was any chance he’d be willing to sell our flour again via mail-order, but he got that tired look and I knew his answer needed to be “no.” I even called around to see if anyone else was already bringing in the same flour in bulk that we do and then repackaging it for mail order. Same answer, no.

I sent my magazine off to the printer thinking I’d covered all my bases by recommending King Arthur organic flour. But once I started hearing your complaints about hooches, etc. I ordered a significant amount, as well as some I received from Bob’s Red Mill. My R&D then (after the fact) consisted of four different mothers, all of them started on the same day, four weeks ago: KA organic bread flour, KA all-purpose organic flour, Bob’s Red Mill organic unbleached white flour and my flour, organic unbleached white flour (the flour I use in my quick-prep mixes). Wow, was I in for a surprise. In fact, Rebekka Mae, called the difference “shocking” once she had access to our flour through my daughter. Both KA flours lumped up no matter how hard I tried to mix them into my mother with a spoon. Bob’s didn’t lump up as much as theirs did, but all three took forever to get going and hooch they did, big time (dark alcohol on the top). I suppose the lumps in the KA flour have to do with the addition of malted barley--something I don’t remember as an ingredient in KA flour years ago when I used to bake with it.

Well, darn it anyhow, my ability to help you find good flour that would make my idea a slam dunk had a bit of a hooch, I mean hitch. Like Prosserfarmgirl said, not all flours are created equal. So I offered our official SISTERS a deal last month that included free shipping on my flour. My husband was convinced I’d lost my mind when he showed me how much money we’d lost on that venture. But I slept better at night knowing some of you had either figured out how to find good flour on your own or at least bought some of mine.

We all know the way to a man’s heart is through hot buttered bread, so I kept feeding him my sourdough creations while saying things like, “There just has to be a way for me to sell my sisters my really super good, like-none-other, reliable, fresh organic flour, perfect for mothers.”

Here’s what he came up with. If we ship it ONLY through the postal service in either increments of 15 or 20 pounds, he can fit the three or four five-pound sacks into one of their large flat-rate packages. The dollar amount then on shipping is significantly cheaper than UPS. Anything less or more, like an order for 5, 10, or 25 pounds doesn’t make sense shipping-wise. And if you place an order for our flour along with some other items in our Web store, we’ll treat them as two separate orders. (For those of you who bought 25 pounds during my Sisterhood special, the UPS shipping completely negated the tiny margin we had on the flour. Oh well.) If you’re baking bread according to my methods, you’ll use up 15 pounds, no problem. Remember, the bread you make using my minutes-a-day method is still far cheaper than anything you can buy, both organic or non-organic.

Someday, I hope we’re milling enough organic whole-wheat flour again to have extra to sell along with our organic white flour. In the meantime, the perfect way to add whole-wheat flour to your breads is to bring in a supply of organic hard-red wheat berries and give them a quick crank on a hand grinder (www.grainmaker.com). Another source you might try for whole-wheat flour is www.bluebirdgrainfarms.com although I need to tell you I haven’t tried their flour, but I do like their website and mission statement.

I think the only way we can get the postal rate on shipping onto our website is to add it to the per pound price, otherwise our Web store software automatically charges UPS rates.

Today my crew put our flour up for sale on our website!!!! Let’s all give Nick, my husband, and Gabe, who manages our Web store, a big THANK YOU!

For those of you who’ve been frustrated, help is on the way. (More flour is on its way to you too, Julie-willowtreecreek). Here’s the link to buy my FLOUR, SPECIALTY SOURDOUGH:

http://shopping.maryjanesfarm.org/s.nl/it.A/id.1891/.f

Now back to my bread book, knowing you have access to the same tried-n-true flour that I use to keep my mother happy, bubbly, lump- and hooch-free.


MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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ruralfarmgirl
True Blue Farmgirl

4309 Posts

Rene'
Prosser WA
USA
4309 Posts

Posted - Mar 09 2009 :  7:16:44 PM  Show Profile  Send ruralfarmgirl a Yahoo! Message
WOW Julie your rolls looks awesome.... I tried your carrot cake and it was heavenly, thanks for the great recipes.

MaryJane~ Thank You.. for making the flour available......... more yummy bread to our table :).....

THANKS NICK AND GABE....!!!!!!

Rene~Prosser Farmgirl #185
http://farmchicksfarm.blogspot.com/http://renenaturallyspeaking.blogspot.com/



Circumstances made us FRIENDS; MaryJane's has made us SISTERS :)
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urban farm girl
True Blue Farmgirl

80 Posts

Melissa
Posen IL
USA
80 Posts

Posted - Mar 09 2009 :  7:31:07 PM  Show Profile
Julie those croissants look awesome as usual....you definitely have the knack! Well I feel good I finally had success today. I made the Honey Wheat Oatmeal Bread Kathy posted and I finally had luck ... my loaf finally rose....put it in the oven ....some one had mentioned putting in some boiling water in the oven...so I did and it turned out ....I believe I could have let it to rise a bit longer but it was getting late and I needed to get dinner on...so with the chicken soup I had the bread and it was big time good. YEAH!! I had made the other day the pancakes Julie posted and also the biscuits and they were big time good. I had changed my flour to Bob's Red Mill and it did seem to make a differnce or the weather or maybe both. I bet MJ's flour is realllll good. Well I'm a happy camper today....good recipe Kathy..thanks!!
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Tina Kay
True Blue Farmgirl

107 Posts

Tina Kay
Deary ID
USA
107 Posts

Posted - Mar 09 2009 :  7:59:55 PM  Show Profile
THis is sooo delicious and very easy to do!!!! I am so glad that my first magazine was Feb-Mar. Thank you, MaryJane.

Tina Kay

Now I get me up to work, I pray the Lord I may not shirk. If I should die before tonight, I pray the Lord my work's all right. Anon.
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willowtreecreek
True Blue Farmgirl

4813 Posts

Julie
Russell AR
USA
4813 Posts

Posted - Mar 09 2009 :  8:18:44 PM  Show Profile
MaryJane - thanks so much for sharing your story! Your last three books have been amazing but when this bread book comes out I believe all of us will feel a special bond with it! And I am SO excited to know this flour will be available to all! Girls I cannot stress enough how amazing the flour it! I just finished baking a loaf of pumpernickel bread using MaryJanes flour and the rise, texture and crumb is AMAZING! Photos and a recipe will be coming tomorrow evening on that!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
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sjs
True Blue Farmgirl

247 Posts

Stephanie
Oakland CA
USA
247 Posts

Posted - Mar 09 2009 :  9:41:06 PM  Show Profile  Send sjs an AOL message  Send sjs a Yahoo! Message
Hi everyone, I'm new and I posted this in elsewhere, but was told that I might get a better response if I put it here. Here goes!

I'm starting my sourdough "mother" today with organic unbleached white flour, but I'm trying to cut white/refined grains out of my diet so I probably won't continue with the white flour. Has anyone here has luck using other grains, like whole wheat, spelt, etc?

The instructions say that whole wheat is harder to work with - has anyone here had any success and would be willing to share your secrets/caveats? I'm excited to eat this bread, but I've got to stay away from the white stuff for health reasons...


Stephanie, Farmgirl Sister #513!

--------------------
Learning to live is learning to let go.

Visit my food blog! http://www.wasabimon.com - natural cooking to live for.
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Sandra K. Licher
True Blue Farmgirl

1106 Posts

Sandra
Horseshoe Bend Arkansas
1106 Posts

Posted - Mar 10 2009 :  05:31:24 AM  Show Profile
Wow! Julie...those croissants are beautiful and I bet they taste delicious too! They look time-consuming though but well worth it I'm sure. I did get in on the deal that Mary Jane offered with her flour last month. It looks great and I got 5-5lb bags and threw it in my freezer for safe-keeping because it gets humid down here fast! Now, I took a bag out this morning and noticed it says WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR not WHITE. Uh-oh....is this the "white" flour that you've been using Julie or did I get wheat flour by mistake? It states it is "Organic Unbleached Wheat Flour". I guess I'll call the farm later since I have to place an order for something else anyway but I need to find out since my original "organic white" is about to run out.
Thanks Mary Jane for all your help in this and for all of you who have added wisdom, advice and experience to this thread. It is well worth it to keep on "plowin' through" until we all get the bread we deserve!

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com
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willowtreecreek
True Blue Farmgirl

4813 Posts

Julie
Russell AR
USA
4813 Posts

Posted - Mar 10 2009 :  07:23:29 AM  Show Profile
Stephanie - I did not start a whole wheat starter but have added whole wheat flour when I get to the baking process. The reason wheat doesn't do as well in the starter has to do with the gluten content. That doesn't mean it wont work you may just need to spend more time developing it. If you are concerned about using white flour give the wheat a try and see if it works for you. Another member named Leezard had sucess using spelt flour.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
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willowtreecreek
True Blue Farmgirl

4813 Posts

Julie
Russell AR
USA
4813 Posts

Posted - Mar 10 2009 :  07:25:15 AM  Show Profile
Sam - that would be a question for MaryJane or the farm. My all-purpose flour comes to me in a big box so I can't vouch for what is written on the bags.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
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sjs
True Blue Farmgirl

247 Posts

Stephanie
Oakland CA
USA
247 Posts

Posted - Mar 10 2009 :  08:29:43 AM  Show Profile  Send sjs an AOL message  Send sjs a Yahoo! Message
Hrmm, so I'm getting in late on this thread and I'm still trying to get through the whole thing (only on page three now...). After reading MaryJane's post on page 63, I'm concerned about the barley additives. I bought some Whole Foods/365 organic unbleached white flour, and I just looked and it does indeed have barley in it. My mother does look good, though, bubbly and definitely smells like sourdough! It does lump when I mix in new flour and it's impossible to get them all out... is this going to be a problem?

Also, I'm searching for Leezard's posts on using spelt, but can't find it in this ginormous thread (did you know ginormous is a real word, in the dictionary and everything?).


Stephanie, Farmgirl Sister #513!

--------------------
Learning to live is learning to let go.

Visit my food blog! http://www.wasabimon.com - natural cooking to live for.
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Sandra K. Licher
True Blue Farmgirl

1106 Posts

Sandra
Horseshoe Bend Arkansas
1106 Posts

Posted - Mar 10 2009 :  08:46:20 AM  Show Profile
Stephanie, mine is lumpy when I first mix in the flour each day but my "Lizzie" seems to eat away and the lumps are gone the next time I add more flour and water so I don't think the lumps are a problem....I've been using my starter with no problem.
I think "ginormous" was just added this year wasn't it? They add new ones each year but some of them do make you wonder...I'm still not comfortable with "ain't" being in there.
Love your quote at the bottom....that is SO TRUE!!!! And the sooner we learn it the better!
Have a great day everyone! P.S. It is 71 here already and I just hung out 2 loads of clothes and they are whipping in the wind....IT"S SPRING!!!! Here in the Ozark's anyway!

Sam in AR..... "It's a great life if you don't weaken!"
Farmgirl Sister #226

www.farmgirlsam.blogspot.com
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