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KatTylee
True Blue Farmgirl

230 Posts

Katrina
Mitchell Nebraska
USA
230 Posts

Posted - Nov 15 2012 :  07:10:40 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Morning all,

I think several are right here in that most of these "lost arts" are just that, lost. It isn't that they don't exist it is just that people have a hard time finding them. My dad was a blacksmith/farrier, my brother is a buckaroo (cowboy that tries to do nothing except what he can do from on top of a horse) and shoes his own horses and a few for other folks. I spin, crochet, am teaching myself to knit, and I'm hoping to get one of my dad's anvils and some of the tools and go to blacksmithing as well. I enjoy welding but it has been a long time since I did any so I'm sure I'm not good at it. :) I think the key is getting to know your neighbors and community. I just moved from an area that was very focused on the recycling/upcycling/farmers market type things. It was great but there didn't seem to be a lot of the older arts there. Now I'm in a much smaller community but it seems to have more of the older arts but it is a more agricultural based community. I think people could probably make more money in the short term in my former community doing the farmer's market and all but I think my new community will probably sustain the older trades for longer. Just an opinion. Don't know if it really works that way or not. It would make an interesting socialogical study...

~"Be yourself; everyone else is already taken."
— Oscar Wilde~
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brightmeadow
True Blue Farmgirl

2040 Posts

Brenda
Ray Township Michigan
USA
2040 Posts

Posted - Nov 17 2012 :  09:04:41 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
@cranberry rose - there is a product in the quilting section of JoAnn's cut in 8 1/2 x 11" sheets. You iron it on to muslin and it stiffens the fabric to about card-stock stiffness to go through the printer. Darn I can't think of the name of it right now.

But I'll bet you could also use regular cardstock and temporary spray adhesive to do exactly the same thing.

OK you got me curious enough to google. There's a lot of ways!

http://www.instructables.com/id/Inkjet-Printing-on-Fabric/step1/Materials-List/
http://blog.makezine.com/craft/how-to_print_on_fabric_with_an/
http://www.myrepurposedlife.net/2010/08/printing-on-fabric.html
http://www.overstock.com/Crafts-Sewing/Inkjet-Fabric-Sheets-8-1-2-X11-10-Pkg/6979959/product.html?cid=202290&kid=9553000357392&track=pspla&adtype=pla&kw={keyword}
http://www.avery.com/avery/en_us/Products/Crafts-%26-Scrapbooking/Printable-Fabric/

Well, you get the idea...

You shall eat the fruit of the labor of your hands - You shall be happy and it shall be well with you. -Psalm 128.2
Visit my blogs at http://brightmeadowfarms.blogspot.com (farming) http://brightmeadowknits.blogspot.com (knitting) or my homepage at http://home.earthlink.net/~brightmeadow

Edited by - brightmeadow on Nov 17 2012 09:13:50 AM
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Bearclover
True Blue Farmgirl

2376 Posts

Bunny
The Dalles OR
USA
2376 Posts

Posted - Nov 17 2012 :  09:32:57 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Brenda, you can also use butcher paper or freezer paper. It is easy to find AT&T the grocery store. It has a waxy side. Iron the fabric on a lower setting to that and trim to paper size. The biggest issue is that most color inks in printers are not color fast. So you either have to smoke the fabric in a special solution, or have a printer with the proper inks.
Spoon flower is cool but their fabrics are I think around $18.00 a yard. And that's even for your own designs. There is fabric you can buy that is already treated but it is also very expensive. It is over $3.00 a sheet for 8.5" x11".



Farmgirl number 3738
My blogs:
www.curiousorangecat.com
Handmade stuff http://www.etsy.com/shop/CuriousOrangeCat?ref=ss_profile

Fabric website: www.bunnyroseco.etsy.com

Not all who wander are lost.../
Plan to improvise
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Bearclover
True Blue Farmgirl

2376 Posts

Bunny
The Dalles OR
USA
2376 Posts

Posted - Nov 17 2012 :  09:34:22 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Brenda, I love your websites!

Farmgirl number 3738
My blogs:
www.curiousorangecat.com
Handmade stuff http://www.etsy.com/shop/CuriousOrangeCat?ref=ss_profile

Fabric website: www.bunnyroseco.etsy.com

Not all who wander are lost.../
Plan to improvise
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harvesttender
True Blue Farmgirl

56 Posts



56 Posts

Posted - Jul 21 2014 :  2:25:05 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I am loving this chat. Did anyone mention rug braiding? That's my thing! As much as possible, I hunt for and rescue 100% wool - from rummage sales, Salvation Army. Goodwill - anywhere that I can find a tag on something that identifies it as 100% wool. This is fast becoming the harder part, as garments are more likely to be only part wool. New wool is still for sale, but prices in my area run about $20/yd. now. I love to recycle and repurpose. And my family's toes love warm woolen rugs!

Harvesttender

www.etsy.com/shop/woolenbrae

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sunshine
True Blue Farmgirl

4877 Posts

Wendy
Utah
USA
4877 Posts

Posted - Jul 21 2014 :  4:47:26 PM  Show Profile  Send sunshine a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
i still make braided rugs


have a lovely day and may God bless you and keep you safe
Farmgirl Sister #115
my blog http://sunshinescreations.vintagethreads.com/
my store http://www.etsy.com/shop/VintageThreads
facebook http://www.facebook.com/?ref=home#!/pages/Sunshines-Creations/104230882941628
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Autumn
Farmgirl in Training

44 Posts

Holly
Ontario
Canada
44 Posts

Posted - Jul 25 2014 :  05:05:25 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I was just skimming through this thread and noticed a lot of people complaining about the lack of seamstresses. Up here in Ontario we have no shortage of them, they're employed in the Bridal shops and there's a handful of alteration shops and freelance seamstresses. I did consider the job myself but after having heard about the trials and tribulations of being a seamstress, as well as the less than mediocre sewing program offered at the local college, I decided against it. I wouldn't want a job that I can't get sufficient training in. I also heard it's a lot of hard work for very little pay. I read about this one seamstress who complained that her clients would often scoff at her estimates and try to underpay her for wedding alterations. People just don't understand the value of the work and how much goes into it. It's not easy.

*AUTUMN*
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YellowRose
True Blue Farmgirl

4590 Posts

Sara
Paris TX
USA
4590 Posts

Posted - Aug 02 2014 :  09:38:30 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
My mother tatted, but growing up I wasn't interested in learning. I keep her shuttle and a sample of her work on my dresser.

Hugs, Sara
Walk in Peace.
Live with Joy.
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brightmeadow
True Blue Farmgirl

2040 Posts

Brenda
Ray Township Michigan
USA
2040 Posts

Posted - Aug 17 2014 :  8:46:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
so I recently found that a craft I was interested in had been declared worthy of UNESCO world heritage intangible status -

https://en.unesco.org/themes/intangible-cultural-heritage. perhaps we should submit these crafts as worthy of recognition by UNESCO

Just because we are not a third-world country does not mean we do not have a heritage worth preserving.




You shall eat the fruit of the labor of your hands - You shall be happy and it shall be well with you. -Psalm 128.2
http://brightmeadowfarms.blogspot.com http://brightmeadowknits.blogspot.com

http://www.ravelry.com/people/Brightmeadow
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Kangaroo Kate
True Blue Farmgirl

253 Posts

Teresa
Red Oak Texas
USA
253 Posts

Posted - Dec 31 2015 :  1:20:19 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This was a good topic. we comment all the time of how much things have changed I homeschooled my son who is now 23 and he is realizing why I had the standards I did and appreciates it now hardly any of his friends had "parents" kids left pretty much on their own. Some boys were over one day to play video games and were stunned at me making from scratch chocolate chip cookies for them! They only got those homemade. One 18 year old almost cried when I made him a birthday cake his mom never bothered. they are not getting the old values and appreciate some of the old trades I heard one kid a time back surprised milk came from a cow... literally.. people actually milk them? I think it is important ladies like us keep alive some of the old traditions. I have always gravitated to the "old ways" guess you could say. was a good life going with grandparents to strawberry patch to pick berries, going with granny to fight thorns and ticks for black berries, then helping to make pies and jellies.. from scratch. the professions that have been mentioned I do see many of them fading. sewing machine repair is one here the fella who would work on the old metal head singers is gone now and no one took over his talent. idea is.. just go buy a new one. well I like my old one. times have changed as someone said but I hope those of us on here can keep alive as much as we can. I cant sell some of the things I used to cant compete with china but I do think there is more of a trend going back somewhat to quality handmade items not just cheap. which is a issue here in Texas with all the illegals. I for one am willing to pay more for something with quality made from someone keeping their trade alive and well.

Dance Like No One Is
Watching.
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ComeOnSammy
Farmgirl in Training

35 Posts

Samantha
Shelton WA
USA
35 Posts

Posted - Jan 16 2016 :  12:24:12 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This might have already been stated, but carpentry is the first thing that came to mind. Housing/homelessness wouldn't be such and issue I think if we still knew how (and were legally ABLE) to build our own dwellings.
On the upside, my husband is a mechanic (learned from his dad since he was a child) and even though he struggled in school, he can basically fix anything with a motor.
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Bonnie Ellis
True Blue Farmgirl

2449 Posts

Bonnie
Minneapolis Minnesota
USA
2449 Posts

Posted - Jan 16 2016 :  8:51:31 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Maybe what we all are striving for is hands-on practical information for living, as addressed in Mary Jane's first book. Much of those skills don't just come naturally but are taught. Farmgirls can teach each other. That is what generations do. I love sharing my skills.

grandmother and orphan farmgirl
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Christy925
True Blue Farmgirl

476 Posts

Christy
Midland Michigan
USA
476 Posts

Posted - Jan 24 2016 :  04:40:43 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm resurrecting my home baking. Used to make loads of wedding/birthday and graduation cakes.I'm approaching retirement age and people are asking for my cookies. I think I'll need the income.So I will slowly get back into it.
I also used to make baby quilts to sell on consignment. I need to get busy :)

Farmgirl Sister #2315
http://www.etsy.com/shop/WildThymeCreations?ref=pr_shop
http://www.flickr.com/photos/marketwoman45/sets/72157627628326507/
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