MaryJanesFarm | Farm Tour

With every new person or customer that discovers us, either through our magazines, books, or by word of mouth, the logical next step is their desire to meet some of us in person and experience MaryJanesFarm firsthand. I have met hundreds, thousands of amazing people this way. I could go on and on here telling you stories about each and every unique person that has wandered up my lane, BUT … I have to be honest, I am coming down with a serious case of farmgirl overload.

How about the travel-weary woman and her daughter who showed up unannounced at 10:30 p.m. needing a place to stay? (I was already in bed, but the next morning I spent a couple of hours with her around the campfire enjoying everything about her!) Or the out-of-state drop-ins coming first thing in the morning to take photos of me when I hadn’t even brushed my hair or teeth yet! Or the impromptu couple (retired from farming) who left my farm disappointed that I wasn’t here to meet them. At that moment, on my way back from town, our opposing cars slowed within inches of one another at the bottom of my lane. We rolled our windows down, I stuck my hand out, she grabbed it, and the rest is history. Mary Lou has become a good friend of ours and we are so proud to sell her handcrafted items in our little farm store.

BUT … I have a farm to run, books and magazines to write, and photos to take. And my neighbors, who have been immensely supportive of what I’m doing, are worried about the growing number of cars traveling our country lane. More importantly, I have down time I am in need of. I chose a private life at the end of a dirt road for a reason. Not only do my family and I need quiet and privacy, but so do our Bed & Breakfast guests and our Pay Dirt Farm School attendees. It doesn’t make sense for me to invite people here to enjoy our gussied-up get-away wall tent Bed & Breakfast and then allow their quiet and privacy to be interrupted by tourists traipsing by, cameras in hand.

It does, it really does, break my heart to turn people away. I have been so honored to meet each and every new “drop-by” I’ve met over the years.

But given I’m human and my energies finite and our reach continues to reach further and further, I’ve brainstormed with my family and employees a solution for how I can still share my farm in a win-win way.

Here’s how:

In other words, no more midday self-guided tours or unannounced drop-bys, please. On occasion, my husband Nick says customers like to stop by to pick up a food order. Remember to give him a call to set that up ahead of time, 208-882-6819.


Click here to
WATCH VIDEOS
about us...

Hello there!
My name's Molasses
(Mo for short),
and I'm the newest
addition to the farm.
Here I am at
only one day old!
If you scroll down,
I'll take you on
a Virtual Tour
of my new home
here at
MaryJanesFarm!

We've also started shooting videos of life around the farm. And we'll add to this page periodically when we have new footage, so be sure to check back!

Go to our video page.

This aerial photo of our farm was taken by National Geographic photographer Jim Richardson. In 1994, he spent several days photographing us and our farm. The result was an article that appeared in the December 1995 issue. We are the red dot in the middle — slightly to the right.

 

 

Meg Butters took this photo of our farm on a frosty day.

 

Where Wild Iris Lane begins.

photo by MaryJane Butters

 

You'll pass by the Ogle barn that has seen better days.

photo by Deborah Kirsner

 

Welcome to our farm.

photo by Elaine McEnery

 

photo by MaryJane Butters

 

Emil Butters, captured by National Geographic photographer Jim Richardson in 1995.

 

In the early spring, you can enjoy hundreds of different irises. Choose your favorites, and we'll send you some starts in the fall.

photo by MaryJane Butters

 

photo by MaryJane Butters

 

photo by MaryJane Butters

 

photo by MaryJane Butters

 

photo by MaryJane Butters

 

“Eating Apples”

photo by MaryJane Butters

 

photo by MaryJane Butters

 

photo by MaryJane Butters

 

photo by MaryJane Butters

 

Farmhand Anna Roberts prepares bouquets for Saturday's Farmers' Market.

photo by MaryJane Butters

 

“Zinnia Heaven”

photo by MaryJane Butters

 

photo by MaryJane Butters

 

photo by MaryJane Butters

 

photo by MaryJane Butters

 

Enjoy random flower beds everywhere.

photo by MaryJane Butters

 

the tour continues

page 1: the farm & gardens
page 2: outdoor living, greenhouse & chicken coop
page 3: growing garlic & farmers' market
page 4: pay dirt farm school, historic flour mill & historic schoolhouse
bed & breakfast slideshow