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Author Merit Badge Awardees - Woo-hoo Sisters!:  Farmgirl Sisterhood Merit Badge Awardees 
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

16301 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
16301 Posts

Posted - Aug 12 2021 :  10:10:30 AM  Show Profile
Carrie Williams (Carrie W, #147) has received a certificate of achievement in Each Other for earning a Beginner Level Blogging Merit Badge!

“I read the book Blogging for Bliss: Crafting Your Own Online Journal by Tara Frey back in 2012 when this badge was added to the Sisterhood Badges. I enjoyed it immensely and took many notes. I already had an active blog, but chapters 1-5 were helpful in getting my online theme developed as far as colors and overall look. If you’re like me, and you learn best by doing, you’ll find that the rest of the book is more helpful once you get started. This is really a book that would be good to own if your blog becomes central to your online presence, such as running your business through your blog. I have been able to borrow the book from my local library so I have enjoyed referring to it as needed.

I also found a couple of other good blogging books. I enjoyed Blogging with Moxie because it had a section specifically for Google Blogger which is the platform I chose. It has a lot of good starter ideas in simple terms with some images, too. Also, How to be a Blogger and Vlogger in 10 Easy Lessons, which is geared toward young people, was a very simple and quick read that had a lot of start-up info for vlogging which is becoming much more prevalent, especially with the wider-spread usage of Instagram and Telegram social media platforms. I am researching this form of blogging more and hope to become more comfortable with making and using video blogging methods.

The theme that I chose for my blog is country living and pretty much all things Farmgirl!”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

16301 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
16301 Posts

Posted - Aug 12 2021 :  10:11:44 AM  Show Profile
Carrie Williams (Carrie W, #147) has received a certificate of achievement in Each Other for earning an Intermediate Level Blogging Merit Badge!

“I started my blog in 2010 and titled it “Aprons of the Adirondacks” because the apron represented my homemaking/child raising lifestyle in a small town at the foothills of my beloved Adirondack Mountains. Originally, I used my blog to share events in my life with my farmgirl sisters online and in my local group. When this badge was created and I read Blogging for Bliss, I made some updates in the style and usability of my blog. At that time, I added my blog to GirlGab.com. Unfortunately, some major life changes caused me to lose track of my original blog login information, so I have started a new one with a slightly different name and a link to the old blog. I am in process of reconnecting on the GirlGab.com site and networking with some new people. My new blog will still include apron-y news and lifestyle posts, but it will also reflect my change in life seasons and some of my story from the last 10 years.

I am excited to get back into blogging, especially since I have given up most forms of social media and would really like to connect with some other country lifestyle gals.”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

16301 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
16301 Posts

Posted - Aug 12 2021 :  10:12:51 AM  Show Profile
Carrie Williams (Carrie W, #147) has received a certificate of achievement in Each Other for earning an Expert Level Blogging Merit Badge!

“There is so much to learn in blogging! After a 9-year hiatus I feel like I'm starting from scratch. I have my new blog up and running and with a few posts, mostly related to other badge activities. I have the old blog linked (because I lost all login info for the old blog and google blogger is SO unhelpful in this situation!). I need to work on the overall appearance and jazz it up some. I will be posting mostly about the other badge activities I'm working on, along with some outdoors events and seasonal photos. I'm hoping to add some reflections on current events (local and global), introduction of people who have changed my life, and how to come full circle as a woman. I still live in the Adirondack foothills, but my interests have broadened greatly and my lifestyle has changed completely. Other than MaryJane’s Farm, I have a few blogs that I follow, and they range from political focus to crafting, women’s interests, and health. I am eager to dive deeper into networking!”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

16301 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
16301 Posts

Posted - Aug 12 2021 :  10:14:24 AM  Show Profile
Carrie Williams (Carrie W, #147) has received a certificate of achievement in Farm Kitchen for earning a Beginner Level Canning Merit Badge!

“The greatest consideration in canning produce and mixed foods is the ph level of the food. According to my Ball Blue Book Guide to Home Canning and Freezing, all fruits are generally acid foods, including tomatoes (not a vegetable!). This would also include any food that has vinegar added like pickles and relishes. The molds and yeasts which are able to live in this low ph environment are destroyed by the boiling water bath and then are not able to return due to the acid. In low acid foods, or those with a higher ph level, these molds and yeasts thrive and are not destroyed by the 212-degree boiling water bath; therefore, processing in a pressure canner will create a higher temperature to thoroughly destroy all these organisms and protect the food for storage. Processing times vary depending on the type of food, whether meat/fish/garden vegetables, and therefore “tried and true” recipes should be followed exactly.
The foods that I have in my cupboards represent some different types of canning processes.
Dole sliced peaches in 100% fruit juice: a high acid fruit, probably hot packed, sealed with a thin film and screw-on lid. Probably processed enough before packing that no bath was necessary, similar to jams and jellies.
Bonne Maman Cherry Preserves: I love this jam because if has the look and feel of homemade jam. This is most likely packed hot into hot jars with a small amount of head space then covered with a screw on lid that seals like a mason jar lid.

Bar Harbor New England Clam Chowder: my favorite chowder that I keep on hand for times when I need something quick to cook up for dinner. Knowing that this food falls into the low acid category, I can assume that it is well processed in the initial phase (no preservatives listed in the ingredients), packed hot in tin can, then processed in a pressurized environment.

I dug out my canning supplies and I am ready to go!”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

16301 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
16301 Posts

Posted - Aug 12 2021 :  10:15:39 AM  Show Profile
Carrie Williams (Carrie W, #147) has received a certificate of achievement in Farm Kitchen for earning an Intermediate Level Canning Merit Badge!

“I'd already canned apples for pie filling for the Apples Badge, so for my second project I made a corn relish using the recipe in the Ball Canning book. I used the canner without the weight and I filled it with enough water to cover the pint jars by a couple inches. I processed for 15 min.

I'm pretty happy with my little jars of golden goodness, and even though the apples are long gone, I have happy memories of picking apples with my kids and peeling, slicing, and processing with them. I have recipe and a jar of goodies ready to go to my friend who let me use her canner.

I'm enjoying getting back into food preservation!”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

16301 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
16301 Posts

Posted - Aug 12 2021 :  10:18:01 AM  Show Profile
Carrie Williams (Carrie W, #147) has received a certificate of achievement in Farm Kitchen for earning an Expert Level Canning Merit Badge!

“My two pressure processed recipes for this level of the badge are Mexican Black Beans and Clam Chowder. The black beans were kind of my own recipe, following the guidelines for canning dried beans and I added some onion, jalapeños, cumin, and cilantro. I followed the clam chowder recipe exactly because I wasn’t confident in how to adjust processing for any changes I made. I had some chowder leftover that wouldn’t fill the last jar so I had that for my lunch and it was excellent! I passed a jar of chowder on to my fishing companion who loves seafood dishes. Both recipes required very long processing time, but I love both foods so it is definitely worth it.”




MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

16301 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
16301 Posts

Posted - Aug 12 2021 :  10:20:03 AM  Show Profile
Carrie Williams (Carrie W, #147) has received a certificate of achievement in Farm Kitchen for earning a Beginner Level Apples Merit Badge!

“The Vermont Tree Fruit Growers Association has a website with page titled A Brief History of Apples. The page says that anthropological research claims that apples have been found to be part of the diet of the earliest humans, supporting the story of Adam and Eve in Genesis and the availability of all fruits of the garden of Eden being there for their enjoyment. The apple is often the symbol of the “forbidden fruit” although the Genesis account does not call the fruit an apple. We do, however, call the lump found on the throat of men an “Adam’s Apple” which is just another popularization of the fruit. According to this website, apples are a symbol of love in Greek and Roman mythology. Supposedly, the Romans brought this symbol of love with them when they conquered England, and voila! Apples are now all over Europe.
At the time of colonization of America, the Massachusetts Bay Colony requested seeds and cuttings from English apples, and eventually the stock made its way to Virginia and parts of the southwest. John Chapman, also known as Johnny Appleseed, carried seeds from his home in Massachusetts to the hills and valleys of Ohio, Indiana and Illinois. This hardy, fast growing tree quickly took root, fruited, and self-seeded orchards in all of these areas. They were eaten fresh, cooked, used to make cider, and fed to livestock. Quite a history for a fruit that has become so common place; it is entirely possible that it even helped to ensure that early colonies were able to succeed and thrive.
The popular quip that “An apple a day keeps the doctor away” has a lot of truth to it! Apples eaten raw can keep the bowels moving and healthy, which aids in the removal of toxins and waste; cooked apples help to relieve diarrhea and dysentery; apples and cider made from apples have an antioxidant effect that has been known to inhibit cancer cell proliferation and reduce cholesterol; and apple cider vinegar has been touted as a miracle cure for almost every condition!

In upstate New York, we have apple orchards everywhere. Most orchards allow people to pick their own apples and these farms are busy from mid-September through October. Every farm has Macintosh, empire and red delicious which are all top choices for eating raw. My favorite is empire and that is always what I look forward to picking when the time comes!

The best baking apples grown here are Jonagold, honey crisp, granny smith, northern spy, Crispin, pink lady, empire, Cortland, and Baldwins.

The best cooking apples available locally are Cortland, empire, gala, granny smith, honey crisp, Crispin, pink lady, macoun, Macintosh, and Jonagold.

At the two orchards nearest to me, the cider is made from any and all varieties that fall to the ground during the picking season. For most fall parties that include apple games or fresh squeezed cider, a couple bushels of Macintosh are the number one choice.

I go apple picking every single fall and my first stop is at a tree of empire apples, where I pick a choice apple to eat on the spot, fresh from the tree and warm from the sun! I then fill a small bag with empire apples to eat during the coming month. My second stop is at a honey crisp tree to get apples for an apple crisp (my Momma’s recipe) and then off to find a Jonagold tree and some macoun for baking and freezing. I live alone now so I usually do only small bags of each variety which I share with my mom and do a little baking to share at work.

Apples are such a part of life here in Upstate New York that we don’t just eat them or cook with them, we also use them in still life paintings! I included a pic of the apples that I painted in the oil painting class that I took as part of the Summer Arts series here in Saratoga County, NY.”




MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

16301 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
16301 Posts

Posted - Aug 12 2021 :  10:23:36 AM  Show Profile
Carrie Williams (Carrie W, #147) has received a certificate of achievement in Farm Kitchen for earning an Intermediate Level Apples Merit Badge!

“I live in apple country so I have been eating, cooking, and baking with apples for as long as I can remember. I have dried apples both on a screen outdoors in the sun as well as in a dehydrator. These are such a treat and, unfortunately, never last nearly as long as the process to make them. I have also canned apple pie filling and made a frozen pie filling recipe that I developed on my own. I also have made many batches of apple butter, both on the stovetop and in my crockpot. This is super easy to make and can be canned like jams and jellies.
My apple inspired meal consisted of microwaved chunky apple sauce, made with only apples (peeled) and some cinnamon, apple-carrot juice made with the juicer, and apple crisp made with my mom’s recipe which is my favorite because it doesn’t have oats in it. Other dishes I have made, and highly recommend, are apple dumplings, apple fritters, apple stuffing (for pork chops), and carrots cooked with apples and mashed with a little butter and cinnamon.

For my BakeOver, I used the crust recipe on page 91 of MaryJane’s Ideabook. I altered the recipe a bit so here is what I did:
1 ½ c flour: 1/3 c spelt flour, 1/3 c coconut flour, 1/3 c unbleached wheat flour, ½ c almond flour
2 t powder
¼ t soda
¾ t salt
3T butter, softened
¾ c apple juice

My “filling” was 2 apples (one gala and one granny smith) peeled and chunked, 1 c craisins, and 2 T maple syrup drizzled over all

I topped with the BakeOver crust and tossed ½ c chopped pecans and 1 T sugar over that.
I baked at 425 degrees for 20 min. Delicious!”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

16301 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
16301 Posts

Posted - Aug 12 2021 :  10:25:13 AM  Show Profile
Carrie Williams (Carrie W, #147) has received a certificate of achievement in Farm Kitchen for earning an Expert Level Apples Merit Badge!

“Apple trees are super easy to grow in Upstate New York and they are found all along back country roads and in fields everywhere. Simple pruning and regular picking of the fruit are really all it takes to get good apples. Most orchards spread harmful chemicals but I have never found that they are needed in the home garden. The tree that I planted in my Washington County garden was easy to care for and the chickens helped keep pests to a minimum. I cannot plant a tree where I live currently, but I have a lovely orchard planned for my next property where I will build a home and fill the yard with fruits and vegetables and animals!

My apple-themed get-together was with my two daughters (my mom couldn’t join us but she usually does) at the orchard closest to me, Saratoga Apple. We kicked off our day with a wagon ride into the orchard where we picked bags of our favorite varieties of apples, then back to the main farm building where we bought a bag of cider doughnuts to snack on while we waited for a table in the brand-new dining area. Once seated, we ordered “flights” of apple wines and hard ciders to sample and score on scorecards as part of their “in-house research” which earned us a discount that we used on acorn squash and some pumpkins to decorate.

I had a lovely time with my girls and was so glad that we were able to spend this day together because the following March my oldest, newly married, daughter moved to California. She loves her new location but she misses the apple season here, almost as much as we miss her. I am hoping that in September 2021 she will be able to return and bring the new grandbaby with her for another apple themed Girl’s Day.”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

16301 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
16301 Posts

Posted - Aug 12 2021 :  10:26:30 AM  Show Profile
Carrie Williams (Carrie W, #147) has received a certificate of achievement in Make It Easy for earning a Beginner Level Candlemaking Merit Badge!

“I found 5 different waxes available for candlemaking. They have different strengths and weaknesses and should be thoughtfully considered based on the type of candle being made. For instance, soy is a clean-burning, eco-friendly, wax option that is becoming very popular, and is less expensive than beeswax. It is a soft wax and melts easily, making it a great option for poured candles. It does not work well for tapers and is actually dangerous in this form as it melts too easily and will not hold up. Beeswax is probably the number one natural, eco-friendly wax for candles, but it is more costly than other waxes. It has been used for candlemaking for much longer than other waxes, and offers a naturally sweet scent. It requires a higher temperature to melt than other waxes making it perfect for tapers and for artisan uses (handcrafted, sculpted, carved candles). It comes in different forms like bars and even sheets that can be rolled into tapers. It works well for dipped tapers, too. Palm wax is a firm wax that is also good for tapers or pillar candles. It is often used for votives as well. It is made from palm oil, another eco-friendly material. Paraffin wax is petroleum based and, although firm and versatile, many candle makers are moving away from the petroleum-based waxes for ecological reasons. Lastly, gel wax, a mineral oil and resin compound, has made a more recent appearance to the candlemaking realm, as it is transparent, rubbery, and long-burning, making it a fun material to color and embellish. It is limited to containers and votives, however, due to its consistency and melting point.

Scents are widely available and most waxes blend well with most scents. There are synthetic scents available for soap and candle makers, but essential oils can be used as well. A general rule of thumb with scenting wax is that a maker should add an amount of scent that is equal to 6-10% of the total weight of the wax. Other scenting materials can be found in most kitchens: herbs and spices which can be added directly to the wax or that can be infused into almond or olive oil first.

Colors are also very available. I found a lot of coloring and scenting options at the local hobby store. More options are online for dyes in liquid and flake form that will give nice rich colors. But the kitchen offers some options too; earthy hues in wax can be obtained from chamomile, vanilla beans, turmeric, lemon peel, paprika, rosehips, cloves, cinnamon, spirulina, nettles, parsley, rosemary, green tea, or sage. Make a sachet of the spice and add to the melted wax, allowing the sachet to become saturated and then “steep” for a while until color appears. Keep the wax at a low temp during this process and remove sachet before making candles with the wax. Herbs and spices can be added directly to the wax, as well, for color and embellishment.

I love these kinds of projects and have found so much helpful advice. My supplies are collected and ready to go!”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

16301 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
16301 Posts

Posted - Aug 12 2021 :  10:27:52 AM  Show Profile
Carrie Williams (Carrie W, #147) has received a certificate of achievement in Make It Easy for earning an Intermediate Level Candlemaking Merit Badge!

“For my candlemaking adventure I used a couple different kinds of wax. I bought beeswax at a local beekeeper/honey producer, but I also ordered soy flakes online. I purchased 10” wicks from Amazon and bought a small package of colorings (blue, red, yellow) and one bottle of scent (citrus). I gathered some dried lavender from garden and cider mulling spices from the local co-op. For molds, I used a tin canister from a store-bought candle that I had already burned and a few little glass jars that I had saved.

I melted my wax in a tin container placed in hot water. I found this container easy to handle with rubber tipped tongs. I melted wax in small batches, scenting and coloring each batch a little differently. The poured candles were simple enough to make. I propped a wick in each container, poured the wax, and trimmed the wick when it was cool and firm.

Since I had recently received my issue of MJF Magazine with the instructions to make campfire starters, I had to make some of these, too! I used soy wax for these since it is eco-friendly and burns up cleanly. I added all kinds of little bits of stuff, including cinnamon sticks, small pine cones, rosemary needles, mulling spices and whole allspice, bay leaves, and some potpourri that I had leftover from a previous project. I started with a foil cupcake liner, added a piece of wick, sprinkled in a base of spices and burnable bits, then poured wax over it all. I then embellished the tops so that most of the wax was hidden. They are so beautiful! I am sending a couple fire starters and the poured candles to my daughter (the containers were from homemade bath salts and sugar scrub that she made for me). I am also sharing fire starters with a few friends who have fire pits in their yards. Now, I just have to go camping so that I can use some, too!”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

16301 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
16301 Posts

Posted - Aug 12 2021 :  10:28:49 AM  Show Profile
Carrie Williams (Carrie W, #147) has received a certificate of achievement in Make It Easy for earning an Expert Level Candlemaking Merit Badge!

“When I was a young girl, we had an amazing store in nearby Vermont called The Jelly Mill. My family would go there once a year, just before Christmas, so that we could shop for one another. The Jelly Mill had multiple levels, and on the basement level they always had different crafts available to make. This is where I first made a dipped taper candle. For a small fee, each patron could create their own taper using any of the various colors of wax. I had a lot of fun making my candle so naturally I had to do this with kids at home. We used paraffin wax and colored it with crayons, which was not the best way to color the wax but we had a whole tin of broken crayons and decided it was a good way to use them. We had fun creating different color combos in our dipped tapers and tried to make them with graduated colorings, starting with light colors and then making more shallow dips in darker colors. The leftover wax was poured into a jelly jar with a wick and nothing was wasted!

Lastly, I found a local candle artisan, Christian Zygla, in Chatham, New York, who makes gorgeous candles from golden yellow and sun-bleached white beeswax. All of the materials in his candles are made in the USA.”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

16301 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
16301 Posts

Posted - Aug 12 2021 :  10:59:09 AM  Show Profile
Allison Clark (Allison Clark, #8292) has received a certificate of achievement in Outpost for earning an Expert Level 'Out There' Women Merit Badge!

“My farmgirl friend, Candy, and I built a wall tent together. We had fun building it together. I caught a striper fish and cooked a striper fish, crab cakes, asparagus, and rice all on the BBQ it was delicious. This was a lot of fun and came out good.”

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

16301 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
16301 Posts

Posted - Aug 12 2021 :  11:00:14 AM  Show Profile
Allison Clark (Allison Clark, #8292) has received a certificate of achievement in Garden Gate for earning an Expert Level The Secret Life of Bees Merit Badge!

“My friend Candy let me put two beehives on her land that Mike let us foster for a bit. Candy let all her weeds grow so they had a way to make the honey. For the last three months, I have been monitoring them. I talked to them and took pictures of them. I have very much enjoyed being around them.

We went to Mike's and he took the time to show us how to extract the honey. He first used a machine that was hot to uncap the honey from the tray, then used a round brush to make sure they were all uncapped. Then he put them in a centrifuge to spin the honey from the frames. The honey would go to the outside of the walls and drain to the bottom. Mike would then strain it into a bucket. The room needs to be very warm during this process. I sweat so much, but it was worth it. I purchased some from him and gave them to some friends. I really enjoyed doing this merit badge. It turned out good.”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

16301 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
16301 Posts

Posted - Aug 12 2021 :  11:01:46 AM  Show Profile
Allison Clark (Allison Clark, #8292) has received a certificate of achievement in Stitching & Crafting for earning a Beginner Level Weaving Merit Badge!

“Knit fabric is made up of one or more yarns formed into a series of loops that create rows and columns of vertically and horizontally interconnected stitches.

Woven fabrics are produced on a loom by interlocking yarns lying in a vertical (warp) and a horizontal (weft) direction. Weft yarns are woven over and under warp yarns, and where the weft yarns loop back to form an edge that doesn't fray, it is called the selvage. When cut, woven fabrics will fray.

I made a handmade loom out of recycled cardboard and recycled yarn that was leftover from old projects. I made five bracelets for friends and gave them to them. I had fun making the bracelets for my friends. This turned out good.”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

16301 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
16301 Posts

Posted - Aug 12 2021 :  11:02:48 AM  Show Profile
Allison Clark (Allison Clark, #8292) has received a certificate of achievement in Stitching & Crafting for earning an Expert Level Mosaics Merit Badge!

“I made an expert mosaic wall hanging. I used graph paper to design it and work out the colors. It took me over 23 hours and I used 0ver 4,500 beads to make it. I had fun doing a little at a time. My husband and I are very patriotic and this will go great with our home decor. It turned out really good.”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

16301 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
16301 Posts

Posted - Aug 12 2021 :  11:15:31 AM  Show Profile
Candy Hogan (Tigger9777, #8283) has received a certificate of achievement in Stitching & Crafting for earning an Expert Level Crochet Merit Badge!

“This was a long project so I am very happy to finally finish it. I made a Christmas Afghan for myself. I usually give everything I make to others, but this time, it was just for me. I stopped counting after 50 hours. I began on Jan. 5 and finished August 2nd 2021.

I teach a 4-H crochet project, so the people I have taught this year were: Johannah, Dylan, Thisbe, Alyssa, and Allie. It turned out great.”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

16301 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
16301 Posts

Posted - Aug 12 2021 :  11:16:59 AM  Show Profile
Candy Hogan (Tigger9777, #8283) has received a certificate of achievement in Garden Gate for earning a Beginner Level 3 R's Rule (Reuse, Recycle, Revive!) Merit Badge!

“I started this badge on 5/5/21. I made my row markers out of tin can lids using a nail and a hammer, I put them out in my garden to mark my plants.

I learned how to sharpen my own garden tools using steel wool and Lindsey oil. I've wiped down my tools and put them in the barn storing them in sand buckets for 3 months from 5/5 through 8/5/21. It was good.”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

16301 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
16301 Posts

Posted - Aug 12 2021 :  11:19:46 AM  Show Profile
Candy Hogan (Tigger9777, #8283) has received a certificate of achievement in Garden Gate for earning an Intermediate Level 3 R's Rule (Reuse, Recycle, Revive!) Merit Badge!

“My friend, Rea (#8284), and I made our scarecrow together. We stuffed straw inside and put her out in the tree orchard. We made her on Cinco de Mayo—May 5th, but had to wait to apply for the badge until the tools for beginner level were done for 3 months. It was fun.”



MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

16301 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
16301 Posts

Posted - Aug 12 2021 :  11:45:56 AM  Show Profile
Cindy Kinion (AussieChick, #6058) has received a certificate of achievement in Outpost for earning a Beginner Level Speak for the Trees Merit Badge!

“For this merit badge I used the "Tree Identification Manual For The North-east Darling Downs Region", edited & published by North-east Downs Landcare Group 2011. It identifies trees according to features such as height, bark, leaf and flower structure and the type of soil and environment in which they grow.

I identified the Eucalyptus salinga (Sydney Bluegum), the E. propinqua (Grey Gum), and the E. tereticornis (Queensland Gum). These are all trees, growing on our property and they are all native species.”

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

16301 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
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Posted - Aug 12 2021 :  11:47:59 AM  Show Profile
Cindy Kinion (AussieChick, #6058) has received a certificate of achievement in Garden Gate for earning a Beginner Level Weather Merit Badge!

“As a basic definition, weather is the state of the atmosphere. Most weather occurs in the troposphere, or the lowest layer of the atmosphere. Weather is made up of multiple parameters, including air temperature, atmospheric (barometric) pressure, humidity, precipitation, solar radiation and wind. Each of these factors can be measured to define typical weather patterns and to determine the quality of local atmospheric conditions.

The motion of air in the atmosphere above our heads plays a large part in the weather we experience here at earth’s surface. Basically, air cools as it rises, which can cause water vapour in the air to condense into liquid water droplets, sometimes forming clouds and precipitation. On the other hand, sinking air is associated with warming and drying conditions. So the first important point to keep in mind is rising air = moistening, sinking air = drying. High pressure is associated with sinking air, and low pressure is associated with rising air. The airflow (due to the Earth’s rotation and friction) is directed slightly inward toward the low pressure centre, and slightly outward away from the high pressure centre. The slightly inward moving air in low pressure causes air to converge and since it can’t move downward due to the surface, the air is forced upward, leading to condensation and precipitation. The opposite occurs with high pressure. Air is moving away from the high pressure centre at the surface (or “diverging”) so as a result, air from above must sink to take its place. A barometer is an instrument measuring atmospheric pressure, used especially in forecasting the weather and determining altitude.

Wind is air in motion. It is produced by the uneven heating of the earth’s surface by the sun. Since the earth’s surface is made of various land and water formations, it absorbs the sun’s radiation unevenly. Two factors are necessary to specify wind: speed and direction. Gases move from high-pressure areas to low-pressure areas. And the bigger the difference between the pressures, the faster the air will move from the high to the low pressure. An air mass is a body of air with a relatively constant temperature and moisture content over a significant altitude. Air masses typically cover hundreds, thousands, or millions of square kilometres. A front is the boundary at which two air masses of different temperature and moisture content meet.”

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

16301 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
16301 Posts

Posted - Aug 12 2021 :  11:49:01 AM  Show Profile
Cindy Kinion (AussieChick, #6058) has received a certificate of achievement in Farm Kitchen for earning an Intermediate Level Know Your Food Merit Badge!

“Well, I started this badge by reading Michael Pollan's "Omnivore's Dilemma". I had actually read this book a long time ago, but it was good to go back and read it again.

I have often tried to buy organic where possible, but I made a concerted effort to ensure that my grocery shop included at least 25% organic. A good place to start was by eliminating the "dirty dozen". These are the fruits and vegetables known to contain the highest amounts of pesticides. They have particularly soft skins and many grow above ground, so are most susceptible to pesticide residue (strawberries, spinach, nectarines, apples, grapes, peaches, cherries, pears, celery, potatoes, capsicums). I also included zucchinis in my list. I have been purchasing organic teas and coffee for quite a long time. We are fortunate to be able to buy organic sourdough, avocados, pumpkins, citrus, and garlic locally from "Kate's Corner". She has a road-side stall with her produce. Kaz's sourdough is added every Saturday morning. I'm also able to purchase organic honey from a local producer in Cabarlah.

Fortunately, High Fructose Corn Syrup is not widely used in Australia. We mainly use cane sugar as a sweetener, however, you may find HFCS in imported products.

We are very fortunate to have some great local farmers markets and CSAs. Here are some of the ones that I use fairly regularly:-
- The Farm Shop (4 Rowbotham Rd, Westbrook). They sell produce boxes from $35-$60, and can arrange a regular delivery;
- The Paddock (Ruthven St, Toowoomba) - they sell ethically-raised, pasture-fed meats including pork, lamb, beef and chicken;
- Green Ag Turkey (Kingsthorpe) - they are part of the Farm2market network. They sell organic, free-range turkey meat. I usually arrange to meet them in Toowoomba for pick up.
- The Organic Food Market (Toowoomba) - This is a great place to purchase organic flours and baking supplies;
- The Source Bulk Foods - The name says it all really, bulk foods to support zero waste.
- Toowoomba Farmer's Market - every Saturday;

For the final component of this badge, I made an unsweetened fruit dish. We don't eat a lot of desserts, but this was an enjoyable project. We settled on a "Minty Pineapple, Cocoa, Banana, Chia & Almond Whip" which included frozen bananas, frozen pineapple, mint leaves, chia seeds, almonds and cocoa whizzed together and frozen. Yum!!”

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

16301 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
16301 Posts

Posted - Aug 12 2021 :  11:50:54 AM  Show Profile
Hannah Frankowski (GinnyBelle, #6994) has received a certificate of achievement in Garden Gate for earning a Beginner Level The Secret Life of Bees Merit Badge!

“My husband and I have been filling the yard with all kinds of flowers. We started by visiting a native wildflower plant sale at our local state park. After planting all of those, we also planted a patch of sunflowers in our side yard, and two large pots full of a pollinator seed blend.

I read Secret Life of Bees.

I watched the trailer for the Vanishing of the Bees.

All of our plants have been growing well and now that its well in to summer, many of our flowers are in full bloom. We see bees of various kinds buzzing around our yard daily.

I really enjoyed the book Secret Life of Bees. Not only did I learn some things about honey bees and bee keeping that I didn’t know, I also just really enjoyed the characters and the story.

The movie trailer was ok, but I didn’t really learn anything new from it. I may do some research on my own though.”

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

16301 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
16301 Posts

Posted - Aug 16 2021 :  11:34:56 AM  Show Profile
Allison Clark (Allison Clark, #8292) has received a certificate of achievement in Cleaning Up for earning an Expert Level Staying Green Merit Badge!

“I conducted an audit to identify areas in my house that could use some additional greening up. I made a list of the top three areas that I needed improvement. I cut down my electricity bill by using my AC a lot less. I also keep my lights off most of the day until evening time. I use my ceiling fans all the time to help keep the house cooler. I also have box fans that I put a wet towel behind so the air will come through in the house cooler. I don't wash my clothes until after 7:00 in the evening. I also replaced a few more bulbs that needed replacing for low energy.

I love the window cleaners that I made using the vinegar in them; I've been continuing to use that to clean all my windows and my mirrors in my home. I've been using my homemade cleaners a lot to clean my house. I've had to go out and buy more supplies that were part of my audit to keep making those particular cleaners that I love.

I spent over 8 hours making sure this happened. My family loves this a lot. They get frustrated with the fact that I don't run the air conditioner much, but they're OK with the fans and how it still stays cool.”

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

16301 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
16301 Posts

Posted - Aug 16 2021 :  11:35:59 AM  Show Profile
Allison Clark (Allison Clark, #8292) has received a certificate of achievement in Garden Gate for earning a Beginner Level Gaining Ground Merit Badge!

“I started a compost heap with my friend Jennifer. We both have been adding stuff to it for over three months now. A few things I have been adding are eggshells, banana peels, coffee grounds, leftover salads, paper, and leaves. It turned out good.”

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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