MaryJanesFarm Farmgirl Connection
Join in ... sign up
 
Home | Profile | Register | Active Topics | Members | Search | FAQ
Username:
Password:
Save Password        REGISTER
Forgot your Password?

 All Forums
 General Chat Forum
 Nifty Thrifty
 Now this is past thrifty
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Author Nifty Thrifty: Previous Topic Now this is past thrifty Next Topic  

Cozynana
True Blue Farmgirl

1123 Posts

Kem

1123 Posts

Posted - Aug 12 2015 :  7:15:57 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I was talking to my mom yesterday and she was telling how my grandma use to take the buttons off of old clothing. BUT, then she said my grandma would start unraveling the thread used to sew the garment together. She would roll this on an empty spool and save it to sew with. She also turned collars had heard about that. But saving the used thread goes to a deeper level. Of course, the fabric of the garment was used also for quilts or rags. They used everything but the squeal. I feel so wasteful, even though this day and age people would call me frugal.

Ozark Farmgirl
True Blue Farmgirl

130 Posts



130 Posts

Posted - Aug 12 2015 :  8:59:12 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Heavens! That does take it to the next level, doesn't it? I don't think I'll be unraveling my old clothes any time soon, but this does inspire me to look around and cut out some more waste.

Steph

Farmgirl #6511
Go to Top of Page

Red Tractor Girl
True Blue Farmgirl

4142 Posts

Winnie
Gainesville Fl
USA
4142 Posts

Posted - Aug 14 2015 :  06:07:58 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I am always inspired and humbled when I read about how people used to recycle parts of almost everything. We hardly can comprehend such ingenuity these days when everything is so cheap and we are equally wasteful. I understand where you are coming from when you say it makes you feel wasteful because it makes me feel the same way. My mother was one of those very frugal and creative people who never let anything go to waste. I should have listened more carefully how she did things!

Winnie #3109
Red Tractor Girl
Farm Sister of the Year 2014-2015
Go to Top of Page

churunga
True Blue Farmgirl

3054 Posts

Marie
Minneapolis MN
USA
3054 Posts

Posted - Aug 14 2015 :  10:05:22 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
When I was young, we didn't live in a place in which I could get yarn when I needed it. I would take old sweater apart to reserve the yarn and reuse it. To this day I save every piece of string, rope and yarn I can. I frequently check out the dumpsters in this fair city for useable cloth. When I take apart a "liberated" piece, cut the seam allowances off and use that on my crochet hook or in my knitting needles. I plan to make some folk inspired dolls out of it. I tell my students to look for different string-like material to use.

I have been watching videos on food waste in America lately and it is amazing. One guy found more than enough to feed his whole four person family for a year in meat alone thrown out by grocery stores. To tell the truth, I would probably do this if I was in better shape and I had a vehicle. The city is a great place for scavengers.

Marie, Sister #5142
Farmgirl of the Month May 2014

Try everything once and the fun things twice.
Go to Top of Page

Cozynana
True Blue Farmgirl

1123 Posts

Kem

1123 Posts

Posted - Aug 15 2015 :  05:25:19 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Marie, I could never get a sweater to unravel right. Is there a technique that works better than others. There are some beautiful colors out there and would love to try again.
Go to Top of Page

ceejay48
Farmgirl Legend/Schoolmarm/Sharpshooter

13311 Posts

CeeJay (CJ)
Dolores Colorado
USA
13311 Posts

Posted - Aug 15 2015 :  11:03:22 AM  Show Profile  Send ceejay48 a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Cutting off buttons and sometimes taking out zippers (depended on the zipper and how securely it was sewn in), but I doubt I'll be doing any thread saving like that! I suppose you do what you have to when you need something!
CJ

..from the barefoot farmgirl in SW Colorado...sister chick #665.
2010 Farmgirl Sister of the Year
Mother Hen: FARMGIRLS SOUTHWEST HENHOUSE

my aprons - http://www.facebook.com/FarmFreshAprons

living life - www.snippetscja.blogspot.com

from my heart - www.fromacelticheart.blogspot.com

from my hubby - www.aspenforge.blogspot.com
Go to Top of Page

windypines
True Blue Farmgirl

2671 Posts

Michele
Bruce Wisconsin
USA
2671 Posts

Posted - Aug 15 2015 :  11:23:13 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Growing up we saved buttons and zippers. I still do cut off buttons, but not zippers! Saving thread now that was extreme.

Farming in WI

Michele
Go to Top of Page

Cozynana
True Blue Farmgirl

1123 Posts

Kem

1123 Posts

Posted - Aug 15 2015 :  7:29:26 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I agree, saving thread is extreme, but my grandparents gradually increased their savings doing things like saving thread. They amazed me. No poor by any means but lived well below their means.
Go to Top of Page

Song Sparrow
True Blue Farmgirl

1010 Posts

Amy
Talleyville Delaware
USA
1010 Posts

Posted - Aug 16 2015 :  06:20:22 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Both my parents were small children during the depression, and they really knew how to save and reuse everything. One thing you don't see anymore is sock darning. My dad was the sock darner in my house, but I don't know what happened to his darning egg. I'd love to have it now!

Happy Day!
Peace in our hearts, peace in the world
Amy (Sister#6098) www.danaherandcloud.com

Go to Top of Page

churunga
True Blue Farmgirl

3054 Posts

Marie
Minneapolis MN
USA
3054 Posts

Posted - Aug 16 2015 :  08:40:04 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Kem, I'm sending you a private email to explain how to do it quickly.

Amy, I have two darning eggs. One is for the heel and one for the toe. I tried to post pictures but it wouldn't let me. I purchased mine from thrifts or antique stores. I believe that, in the case of the toe one, they didn't know what it was. I didn't tell them until after I gave them the money. The writing on it says "FOOT FORM PAT. NOV obscured 07". I'll have to polish it up and get a better look.



Marie, Sister #5142
Farmgirl of the Month May 2014

Try everything once and the fun things twice.
Go to Top of Page

YellowRose
True Blue Farmgirl

4249 Posts

Sara
Paris TX
USA
4249 Posts

Posted - Aug 16 2015 :  08:53:52 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I grew up with darned socks. When I was little my mother did it and she was very good at it. By the time I was ten I had to darn my own socks and was not good at it. The darned socks rubbed blisters on my feet. In high school I worked after school and on Saturdays and with my own money I bought new socks and never darned them again.

I remember a woman that was quite wealthy who she saved pieces of bath soap and sewed them into washcloths to wash her face. She had grown up in the depression and never forgot the hard times.

Years ago I had a neighbor who had grown up in the depression too. She could afford to brew a fresh pot of coffee each morning but if there was coffee left from the day before she would drink that first. She didn't like leftover coffee but she drank it anyway. She would say "waste not - want not".

Sara~~~ FarmGirl Sister #6034 8/25/14
Lord put your arm around my shoulders and your hand over my mouth.

Go to Top of Page

Song Sparrow
True Blue Farmgirl

1010 Posts

Amy
Talleyville Delaware
USA
1010 Posts

Posted - Aug 17 2015 :  2:21:05 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Oooh Marie, I want to see the photos! I don't darn socks, but if I had an egg I'd probably try.

Happy Day!
Peace in our hearts, peace in the world
Amy (Sister#6098) www.danaherandcloud.com

Go to Top of Page

AuntJamelle
True Blue Farmgirl

556 Posts

Jaime
South Bend Indiana
USA
556 Posts

Posted - Sep 08 2015 :  11:17:54 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Unraveling for the THREAD! That is dedicated! I've heard of unraveling for the yarn before, of course, but WOW! Isn't it crazy how everything is relative? What we consider doing pretty good on being frugal/non-wasteful would probably give our ancestors fits. And on the other hand, those same things we do are probably viewed as overkill by people that don't necessarily follow the waste not/want not philosophy in life.

We throw away so much as a matter of course. I try to walk the line between wasteful and hoarder :)

I have a terrible time throwing away any sort of clothing. Even if it is too bad for donating - I have to put it aside to cut up for cleaning rags. Or bits of it might be saved for my crafts.

Another thing I've always done is to save the extra buttons that come when you buy new shirts. Or sweaters with beading will often have a little package attached with extra beading/sequins - I always save those for crafting. I also clip the little ribbons that are usually inside the shirt - designed to help keep the garment on the hanger in the store. The ribbons are always pretty and they are the perfect size to use as the hanger for the ornaments I make for Christmas. Every little bit helps!
Go to Top of Page

Old Spirit
True Blue Farmgirl

1488 Posts

Rae
MN
1488 Posts

Posted - Jun 29 2016 :  7:22:40 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
My mother used to darn socks too! I was just thinking about it the other day. We really do waste a lot today and also are losing a lot of skills by not repairing and reusing. I do keep buttons myself and need to start reusing more fabrics, etc. So glad I found this post as a good reminder and source of information!
Rae



...those who hope in the Lord will renew their strength. They will soar on wings like eagles:...
Isaiah 40:31

Go to Top of Page

rachelbee
True Blue Farmgirl

207 Posts

Rachel
Carmel IN
USA
207 Posts

Posted - Jun 30 2016 :  06:34:10 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
We didn't have a darning egg so my mom showed me to do it (gently and carefully) by sticking a lightbulb down in it.

___________________

Rachel, #6992
Go to Top of Page

MaryJanesNiece
True Blue Farmgirl

3198 Posts

Krista
Utah
USA
3198 Posts

Posted - Jun 30 2016 :  11:27:03 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Wow that is definitely thrifty! I save buttons off of old clothes but I would never have thought to save the thread. It really does go to show how much we waste and take for granted. I'll be sure to see what else I can do to repurpose my old clothing.

Krista
Go to Top of Page

queenmushroom
True Blue Farmgirl

985 Posts

Lorena
Centerville Me
USA
985 Posts

Posted - Jul 08 2016 :  1:22:03 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Even though there is nothing wrong with saving buttons, thread, and general repurposing, you need to remember that our grandparents and great grandparents just couldn't run to the store for every little need. Most women were home, tending to kids and household/farm work/kids. Men may have had some outside work like carpentry skills, butchering etc. but in those days, especially during the depression, money was tight if you had money to begin with. They were instinctively taught to save every scrap right down to the squeal. The store run may have been once a month IF it was a good month, but more likely than not twice a year. in this day and age, with the quality of clothing (especially socks and under clothes) it's simply not worth the darning as the material that are used in this day and age are flimsy. I turn my son's jeans, that he wore to school, into shorts. I wear my clothes until there's hardly anything left to wear, including my bras.

Patience is worth a bushel of brains...from a chinese fortune cookie
Go to Top of Page

katmom
True Blue Farmgirl

12270 Posts

Grace
WACAL Gal WashCalif.
USA
12270 Posts

Posted - Jul 09 2016 :  9:31:50 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Speaking of being frugal ... my mother as a little girl growing up in war torn Germany to this day is frugal ....and she is not poor by any means..
and yet when it comes to (scotch) tape... she is very miserly
With it! Using the utmost maniscual piece ot tape... according to her... to have such a luxury such as tape was unheard off.

Bartering was a way of life.. butter for flour, etc... and periodicly farmers would shovel potatoes from their wagons onto the streets in the towns and villages for the women to go and scoop up into their aprons to feed their families. To this day, potatoes are a main stay in mom's and my kitchen.

Yes times were harder and families were frugal ... It's all about making the best out of a situation... or a "silk purse out of a sows ear"...

>^..^<
Happiness is being a katmom and Glamping Diva!

www.katmom4.blogspot.com & http://graciesvictorianrose.blogspot.com


Edited by - katmom on Jul 09 2016 9:34:44 PM
Go to Top of Page

Old Spirit
True Blue Farmgirl

1488 Posts

Rae
MN
1488 Posts

Posted - Jul 10 2016 :  03:13:11 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
And don't you all think a whole lot less waste? We are working on that food wise and things wise. Fixing and reusing what we can, eating left overs first, etc. we have never wasted much but just being even more aware of things.

When storms wake you at 4:30 time to think #129300;#128522;



...those who hope in the Lord will renew their strength. They will soar on wings like eagles:...
Isaiah 40:31

Go to Top of Page

ceridwen
True Blue Farmgirl

718 Posts

Carole
Northeast New York
USA
718 Posts

Posted - Jul 12 2016 :  08:12:11 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
My maternal grandfather saved strings. It was used for everything back then. Packaging was not like it is today. They lived in the city, went to the butcher who would wrap the meat in freezer paper and tie it off with string. When we cleaned out their home, there were so many balls of strings! During the depression, women used strings to crochet doilies! And of course, feed sack was a big thing.

I find that there is so much waste today. My mother has a wonderful collection of drinking glasses all from jam, mustard and/or peanut butter. I wonder why they don't package that way anymore?

Carole
Farmgirl Sister 3610 - Nov 7/2011
http://www.carolesquiltingetc.com
http://www.fibrejunction.com
Go to Top of Page

texdane
Farmgirl Legend Chapter Leader Chapter Guru

4250 Posts

Nicole
Sandy Hook CT
USA
4250 Posts

Posted - Jul 27 2016 :  09:39:16 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
My grandmother saved rubber bands - any off of newspapers, produce...she grew up in the depression as well. But saving thread? Oh my that makes my head spin. Can you imagine how TEDIOUS that would be? Of course, I can imagine doing that if needed. Aren't we all blessed?

Thanks for sharing, love this post.
Farmgirl Hugs,
Nicole

Farmgirl Sister #1155
KNITTER, JAM-MAKER AND MOM EXTRAORDINAIRE
Chapter Leader, Connecticut Simpler Life Sisters
Farmgirl of the Month, January 2013

Suburban Farmgirl Blogger
http://sfgblog.maryjanesfarm.org/

www.facebook.com/suburbanfarmgirlblogger
Go to Top of Page
  Nifty Thrifty: Previous Topic Now this is past thrifty Next Topic  
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Jump To:
Snitz Forums 2000 Go To Top Of Page