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Carol
Moderator/MaryJane's Design Diva

448 Posts

Carol
Moscow Idaho
USA
448 Posts

Posted - Jan 14 2009 :  12:14:25 PM  Show Profile
Hi girls.
Remember, you're making sourdough bread here, and sourdough breads and French-type breads are traditionally simple and have no added oils.
Happy baking!
Carol


"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well-preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, red wine in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and screaming 'WOO HOO, what a ride!'"
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ennoid
Farmgirl in Training

22 Posts

D
FL
USA
22 Posts

Posted - Jan 14 2009 :  1:03:04 PM  Show Profile
I think the added broiler pan of water on the bottom rack of the oven is supposed to help keep the bread moist while it's baking.

I'm excited to find out next week. My mother will be ready then.

Edited by - ennoid on Jan 14 2009 1:04:17 PM
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willowtreecreek
True Blue Farmgirl

4813 Posts

Julie
Russell AR
USA
4813 Posts

Posted - Jan 14 2009 :  1:55:57 PM  Show Profile
Thanks Carol.

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com
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LindaEllen
True Blue Farmgirl

275 Posts

Linda
Missouri
USA
275 Posts

Posted - Jan 14 2009 :  3:15:43 PM  Show Profile
Oh if the talk of the town isn't Artisan Bread. I just finished reading Mary Janes way of making bread, and it looks wonderful, and easy to. I got the last copy off the stand in our closest town, wow that was close. I looked all over the city yesterday for a copy.

I have seen others way of making artisan bread and did a couple of loafs, yum good . But MJ's recipe making "mother" is the way to go. The simple ingredience is just unbelievable to making this very good for you type of bread.

I got a picture over on my blog on the Artisan bread I made and it was good, but I can't wait to try this even better Mary Janes way.

Its very cold here in MO, got my hot cocoa and more good reads from Mary Janes Farm Magazine, I'm good for the night : ).

Linda
Farmgirl Sister #343

Locust Trail Homestead
http://www.homesteadblogger.com/walkabout/
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willowtreecreek
True Blue Farmgirl

4813 Posts

Julie
Russell AR
USA
4813 Posts

Posted - Jan 14 2009 :  4:59:05 PM  Show Profile
Hey Linda! Glad to hear your going to give this a go! I am your neighbor to the South and it looks like you are sending that arctic air my way! BRRRRR! Our highs for tomorrow and friday are only supposed to be in the upper teens and lower 20's! Hot cocoa sounds perfect!

Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com
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K-Falls Farmgirl
Chapter Leader

2096 Posts

Cheryl
Klamath Falls Oregon
USA
2096 Posts

Posted - Jan 14 2009 :  6:43:21 PM  Show Profile
I started mine today. Can't wait to get to the Eat part! I am using well water so I hope it works. Anyone else not using purified water from a bottle?

http://www.k-fallsfarmgirl.blogspot.com/
Come visit the barn at http://barndoorcreations.blogspot.com/
Cheryl
Farmgirl #309
"If you don't like something, change it. If you can't change it, change your attitude." Maya Angelou
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Laura Marie
True Blue Farmgirl

419 Posts

Laura
Rancho Cordova California
USA
419 Posts

Posted - Jan 14 2009 :  6:45:03 PM  Show Profile
Alright ladies...I think I figured out the answer to my question but I do want to ask this and hopefully I figured it out right....
In the article after starting the mother it says "Cover with wet dishtowel" then it says to see page 68, I didn't see anything on page 68 about covering it with a wet towel, but on 69 it says, "For the first week of her life, she needs to be covered with a thin, dry cotton dishtowel...but after that, you'll want to wet your towel with purified water..." So I'm thinking after the further explaination of why you use a wet dishtowel, that I do what it says on page 69, dry towel for 1st week then wet towel. Am I correct? I'm new at this bread thing. I bake and cook but have never done the bread thing!
Thanks MJ!

Laura Marie #369
www.lauramariedesign.com

"It's not the size of the farm but the size of your heart!"
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12892 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12892 Posts

Posted - Jan 14 2009 :  7:04:31 PM  Show Profile
Your summary is correct Laura. On page 67 it should have said DRY dishtowel. That must have confused you. However, some of the women have already said their mother dried out too much that first week. Someone then mentioned putting plastic over it. If your home air is too dry, PLEASE DO try the wet towel/plate method on page 69. (I was trying to cross-reference them but didn't pull it off completely.) I just don't think plastic is the way to go on this. I always keep a dry towel over my mother the first week it's incubating. I've noticed that if there's a thin crust on it in the morning, I can just stir it in and it disappears without leaving lumps. (I think the healthy, good bugs get busy on those lumps during the day. Remember, it's a whole ecosystem in there!)

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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K-Falls Farmgirl
Chapter Leader

2096 Posts

Cheryl
Klamath Falls Oregon
USA
2096 Posts

Posted - Jan 14 2009 :  7:25:22 PM  Show Profile
Thank you for clarifying that MaryJane.. I am wet toweling it...

http://www.k-fallsfarmgirl.blogspot.com/
Come visit the barn at http://barndoorcreations.blogspot.com/
Cheryl
Farmgirl #309
"If you don't like something, change it. If you can't change it, change your attitude." Maya Angelou
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Laura Marie
True Blue Farmgirl

419 Posts

Laura
Rancho Cordova California
USA
419 Posts

Posted - Jan 14 2009 :  7:39:25 PM  Show Profile
Thanks for the information Mary Jane. I will keep a close eye on my mother and go from there. I will see how it goes!

Laura Marie #369
www.lauramariedesign.com

"It's not the size of the farm but the size of your heart!"
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Alee
True Blue Farmgirl

22856 Posts

Alee
Worland Wy
USA
22856 Posts

Posted - Jan 14 2009 :  7:52:10 PM  Show Profile  Click to see Alee's MSN Messenger address  Send Alee a Yahoo! Message
Hi ladies!

It has been my experience that the oil free breads work great! They end up having a richer wheatier taste. Just like with beef- a little salt can bring out the flavor and sauces (in this case oils) can change the taste. It's all part of the wonderful experience of baking (and eating!) bread.

I think a lot of farmhouse and artisan breads were originally made without the oils because, if you think back- oils were hard to come by. Butter was a commodity, and vegetable oils (depending on your region) were scarcer still.

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com
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Ronna
True Blue Farmgirl

1891 Posts

Ronna
Fernley NV
USA
1891 Posts

Posted - Jan 14 2009 :  8:20:21 PM  Show Profile
True sourdough has no sugar, oil/fat or yeast. I made my starter and did not use any of these. Yes, it took longer to get going, but after all these years it's still strong and healthy. Bread made without commercial yeast takes longer to rise. I've used it in so many different recipes, with and without yeast.
Since I'm still waiting for my issue of MJF magazine, I can't comment on Mary Jane's recipe and probably wouldn't anyway. I prefer to not step on anyone's toes, most especially the Queen Bee's.
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12892 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12892 Posts

Posted - Jan 15 2009 :  07:23:01 AM  Show Profile
Hi Ronna,
Go to the link in the first post on this thread. It's all right there!


MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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KansasConnie
True Blue Farmgirl

69 Posts

Connie
Atchison County Kansas
USA
69 Posts

Posted - Jan 15 2009 :  07:44:03 AM  Show Profile
I'm also using well water. My mother is only a couple days old, but she's already bubbly and "alive" looking! Ohhh...I can't wait until baking day!!! Cheryl--How is your mother looking/doing?

Kansas Connie
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willowtreecreek
True Blue Farmgirl

4813 Posts

Julie
Russell AR
USA
4813 Posts

Posted - Jan 15 2009 :  08:16:45 AM  Show Profile
Here is the link for MaryJanes recipes again:
http://www.maryjanesfarm.org/Recipes-Patterns-Instructions/no-knead_bread.asp

Some of you have been voiceing questions or concerns over using well water. MaryJane suggests either well water or purified water for the mother. The point is to avoid chlorine and other chemicals from the water being a part of the mother. If you have unchlorinated well water you should not have any issues with your starters.

A few things of interest:

Here is a link to an NPR article about the History of Sourdough
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=6061648

Here is a link to a chart that discusses the different names used for sourdough starters
http://www.kingarthurflour.com/professional/preferments.pdf


Farmgirl Sister #17
Blog
www.willowtreecreek.wordpress.com
Felt and Fabric Crafts
www.willowartist.etsy.com
www.willowtreecreek.com
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12892 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12892 Posts

Posted - Jan 15 2009 :  08:27:15 AM  Show Profile
With regards to well water, it might work--you won't know unless you try! I happen to have a distiller here at the farm so I use it for my sourdough. I'll try my well water next and let you know how it turns out. I do know that chlorinated water won't work. It seems like most people have some kind of water filter in their homes and should consider that kind of water PURIFIED. I haven't tried the cheaper versions like Britta.

Also, I wanted to point out that in the early part of the century and well into the 40s in some cases, commercial bakeries were still making true sourdough bread. Sourdough isn't just for home use. Isolated quick yeast is a "recent" development, relatively speaking.

French Meadow Bakery in MN makes and sells true sourdough. (There are others across the US and of course true sourdough artisan breads are still common in Europe.) French Meadow has a restaurant in the Minneapolis airport that makes the best organic sandwiches on earth--using true sourdough. If you travel and can pick that airport for a brief layover, give yourself an extra hour to dine there. They also serve breakfast. Prosserfarmgirl, Katy, Rebekka Mae and I ate there on our way to the Iowa quilt shoe. YUM!


MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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dkelewae
True Blue Farmgirl

1310 Posts

Diana
Saint Peters MO
USA
1310 Posts

Posted - Jan 15 2009 :  09:09:59 AM  Show Profile
Okay, I'm a breadmaking neophyte but was wondering if there were recipes for non sourdough artisan bread? Hubby won't touch sourdough bread.

Diana
Farmgirl Sister #272
St. Peters MO
Country Girl trapped in the city!

http://farmgirldreams.blogspot.com/
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country roads
True Blue Farmgirl

442 Posts

Melissa
Shinglehouse Pa
USA
442 Posts

Posted - Jan 15 2009 :  09:17:36 AM  Show Profile
If well water is ok, then spring water should be fine too right? Our water comes straight from a spring up on the hill. I will be starting my mother this weekend...wish me luck!

Take care, Melissa.

Farmgirl # 352

~Think happy thoughts~
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MaryJane
Queen Bee

12892 Posts

MaryJane
Moscow Idaho
USA
12892 Posts

Posted - Jan 15 2009 :  09:18:47 AM  Show Profile
I don't have any, Diana. I've been sour jane since day 1. I'm sure if you googled "artisan bread" you'd find something. You should at least try my method and see if it wins over your husband. Wouldn't that make a great testimonial!

MaryJane, Farmgirl #1 Plowin' Thru ~ giving aprons a good wrap for 45 years and counting ~
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dkelewae
True Blue Farmgirl

1310 Posts

Diana
Saint Peters MO
USA
1310 Posts

Posted - Jan 15 2009 :  09:46:48 AM  Show Profile
I'll give it a try and report back on if my hubby is won over :) I just checked and one of our local grocery stores carries the King Arthur flour...yippee!

Diana
Farmgirl Sister #272
St. Peters MO
Country Girl trapped in the city!

http://farmgirldreams.blogspot.com/
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Amie C.
True Blue Farmgirl

2099 Posts


Finger Lakes Region NY
2099 Posts

Posted - Jan 15 2009 :  11:55:52 AM  Show Profile
I just found this thread, and ironically enough, I started a sourdough starter according to a different program a few days ago (a group I volunteer for is going to do a Klondike cooking demonstration as part of the "Big Read" program - The Call of the Wild is the selected book).

So I think I'll start a second sourdough "mother" following Mary Jane's instructions and see how they differ from each other. My current one is just commercial flour, tap water, and dry active yeast! I wish I'd seen this thread first...oh well.

I have a question about the cast iron saucepan...would a dutch oven work as well? I just got one for Christmas and I'd love to try it out.
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Alee
True Blue Farmgirl

22856 Posts

Alee
Worland Wy
USA
22856 Posts

Posted - Jan 15 2009 :  12:10:46 PM  Show Profile  Click to see Alee's MSN Messenger address  Send Alee a Yahoo! Message
Amie- The Dutch oven should work great- especially if it is a true dutch oven and not a teflon look-a-like. I wouldn't suggest using Teflon because of the chemicals that Teflon has in it.

Alee
Farmgirl Sister #8
www.awarmheart.com
Please come visit Nora and me on our blog: www.farmgirlalee.blogspot.com
Put your pin on the farmgirl map! www.farmgirlmap.blogspot.com
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Amie C.
True Blue Farmgirl

2099 Posts


Finger Lakes Region NY
2099 Posts

Posted - Jan 15 2009 :  12:26:07 PM  Show Profile
It's made by Lodge, and from what I read on the box it certainly sounds like it's real cast iron. Glad to hear it will work!
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Bonne
True Blue Farmgirl

3003 Posts

Bonne
Littleton CO
USA
3003 Posts

Posted - Jan 15 2009 :  5:22:38 PM  Show Profile
Amie, I've got a 2 qt. "Texsport" cast iron dutch oven that I'm going to
bake my bread in. I got it at a local sporting goods store; fairly inexpensive too!
Many cast iron pieces come pre-seasoned these days, but I still put them through the seasoning
process to get rid of any residual smell. I'm also going to pick up some parchment paper, as MJ advised,
as I've only used it for cooking a couple times. Good luck baking this weekend everyone! ;)



http://bonne1313.blogspot.com/ BLOG
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chessie
True Blue Farmgirl

403 Posts

Karen
Vista CA
USA
403 Posts

Posted - Jan 15 2009 :  6:55:27 PM  Show Profile
Bonne, That is what I want. Can you tell me the name of the sporting goods store you found this? I went to Sports Authority today with no luck... also went to my local antique stores with a large selection of cast iron items but nothing but small fry pans.
Thanks!!!!
Karen

www.edgehillherbfarm.com "where the name is bigger than the farm, but no one seems to mind"
blog http://edgehillherbfarmer.spaces.live.com/default.aspx?wa=wsignin1.0
happy farmgirl #89
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